Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ideal set of end mills

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PStechPaul
    replied
    I bought a cheap set of two-flute end mills from Harbor Freight when I bought my mill, and they work pretty well for most purposes, using low speed and fairly light cuts on aluminum and mild steel. I chipped it when it fell out of the spindle along with the holder onto the table.



    Since then I have purchased various end mills on eBay and other venues, like ENCO and McMaster. I have several "favorite" end mills that are my "go-to" for most jobs. I don't do a lot of machining and what I do is not very critical or tricky. So I have pretty much all I need now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    The thing about having that set(s) is that when you need some specific size, you have it. Yes, the 1/8", 3/16", 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" ones get used the most. And they wear out first. So you buy those sizes to replace the worn ones. I usually get several at a time for those popular sizes, never less than two. Some of the odd sizes in my set have never been used. But they are there is I need that particular size.

    Another thing that I do is occasionally purchase some used ones on E-bay or other web sources. These often have wear on the outer corners only. So I take a stone to them, BY HAND, and round off those corners, preserving the clearance behind that rounded edge. This is not as difficult as you may imagine. Then I have a nice, sharp end mill that leaves a nice round fillet between two surfaces. And it will last a lot longer than a new one with a sharp corner. I often reach for these as my first choice if a sharp corner is not a must on the part.



    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    To me, buying a set of cheap end mills in a box is silly. Buy good quality in a few sizes and USE THEM. When you need a 7/16" end mill (which I never have yet) you can easily buy one.

    I could get by for a long time with 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2" end mills.

    metalmagpie

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Think about what you will be doing the most and scale towards that end.Typically the sizes most often used on a Bridgeport/clone will be 1/8,3/16,1/4,3/8,1/2,5/8 and 3/4 in other words mostly what will fit into standard collets and small endmill holders.

    Typically I buy the 1/8 thru 1/4 sizes in two flute carbide because the extra rigidity and ability to run at high speeds come in handy for those smaller sizes.In the 3/8-3/4 I buy quality double end HSS and keep a carbide 4 flute in the 3/8 and 1/2 sizes.

    Roughing endmills I buy quality HSS Cobalt,course pitch in 5/8 and 3/4 sizes and then keep a 7/8 and 1" reduced shank rougher as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave C View Post
    Those are carbide coated, not solid carbide.
    Very much solid carbide, I have couple of sets. Or have You got coated ones?

    Description mentions "tungsten steel" but that is just a chinglish translation. They are TIALN coated solid carbide.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave C
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
    Chinese coated carbide endmills are so cheap that HSS makes sense only in bigger sizes. Even then you are able to move more material with the 1/2" carbide end mill vs 3/4" HSS and no need for coolant.

    Either buy fanciest variable flutes or cheapo chinese carbide. These are cheaper than any decent HSS I have come across:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/8pcs-Carbid...UAAOSwIQdZMhXn

    On my tiny these are very good value for money:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/5pcs-6mm-x-...EAAOSwg8tZ5wZ7
    Those are carbide coated, not solid carbide.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Chinese coated carbide endmills are so cheap that HSS makes sense only in bigger sizes. Even then you are able to move more material with the 1/2" carbide end mill vs 3/4" HSS and no need for coolant.

    Either buy fanciest variable flutes or cheapo chinese carbide. These are cheaper than any decent HSS I have come across:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/8pcs-Carbid...UAAOSwIQdZMhXn

    On my tiny these are very good value for money:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/5pcs-6mm-x-...EAAOSwg8tZ5wZ7

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    To me, buying a set of cheap end mills in a box is silly. Buy good quality in a few sizes and USE THEM. When you need a 7/16" end mill (which I never have yet) you can easily buy one.

    I could get by for a long time with 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2" end mills.

    metalmagpie
    In this day of instant gratification, the definition of "easily buy one" is rather fluid. If I am working in my shop on Friday evening, I will not be able to get a good quality 7/16th end mill until Monday. Even then, that requires spending a bundle for premium shipping or driving 20 miles to the nearest tool supply.

    A decent quality mill in a set is better than a good one that you don't have.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    I buy high quality American made HSS endmills, usually Niagara. They last much longer, and I get them dual ended. 3/8’s most used but going to experiment with indexable carbide. The 2” indexable carbide facemill works exceedingly well on my Bridgeport.

    Leave a comment:


  • ezduzit
    replied
    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    To me, buying a set of cheap end mills in a box is silly. Buy good quality in a few sizes...
    This is good advice.

    Leave a comment:


  • rkepler
    replied
    There are some sets from good makers available, but you're going to be paying a lot more than you would for one of the cheap Chinese sets for the additional value. I bought one of the cheap Chinese sets when I started out and they mostly worked, I replaced them as I needed with decent quality endmills. I have a couple of good sets that I reserve for brass use and piles of of "other" that I picked up here & there (auctions and fleaBay) including small endmill sets (1/16 up to 1/8) in neat clear plastic cases. I also spend a lot of time with 3/8" and 1/2" endmills where I tend to carbide.

    Leave a comment:


  • metalmagpie
    replied
    To me, buying a set of cheap end mills in a box is silly. Buy good quality in a few sizes and USE THEM. When you need a 7/16" end mill (which I never have yet) you can easily buy one.

    I could get by for a long time with 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2" end mills.

    metalmagpie

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    I've got one of those 1/8 to 3/4 two and four flute sets as well. And like some have written above use them a lot. My most used sizes are 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 and 5/8. And the 3/16 and 3/4 see fairly common use as well.

    I came across a few radius corner end mills out of the old Boeing Surplus Center and find I like to use them where I want a radiused corner. I've got about 8 of them but there's really only three sizes and the rest are duplicates of these. I'd have to double check the sizes but they have proven to be pretty handy on some projects.

    After that there are the one off's bought for some specific uses.

    I've got a few cobalts end mills but so far have managed to work around the specific need for carbide. But with the cost of import carbide mills being low enough to justify for home use where it's only a hobby I'll likely get a few sizes to try soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • PT Doc
    replied
    I have a great opprtunity to buy tooling at excellent prices and what to put together a solid list. Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Griper
    replied
    I picked up a set of HSS endmills, both 2 and 4 flutes. They went from 1/8" to 3/4", but I found that I used 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" almost exclusivley. I tried carbide but I use HSS for roughing and cobalt for finishing.

    It took me a while to find a local supplier for when I didn't want to wait for better deals from my online suppliers. You should have a McFadden Dale nearby, they have everything I need in a pinch.

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    I forgot to mention that I pick up carbide endmills as needed for projects that required a lot of stickout or cutting hardened metals.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X