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    This south bend lathe elongated penny was in a collection I just picked up
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  • #2
    If someone in the UK did that to a coin that was still legal tender, they could be prosecuted for "defacing coins of the realm".

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    • #3
      Originally posted by old mart View Post
      If someone in the UK did that to a coin that was still legal tender, they could be prosecuted for "defacing coins of the realm".
      There are machines in lots of place in the UK for doing that with current coinage, because the wording of the law refers to melting down or breaking up I don't think anyone gets upset about it ;-)
      If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Magicniner View Post
        There are machines in lots of place in the UK for doing that with current coinage, because the wording of the law refers to melting down or breaking up I don't think anyone gets upset about it ;-)
        Nice pun

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        • #5
          Saw that kind of machine in Germany, back in the '90s. The Sinsheim Auto + Technik museum had onebthat rolled an image of The Blue Flame rocket car onto a coin.

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          • #6
            There used to be machines that flattened a penny and pressed the Lord's prayer on it. I think I have one somewhere. I also have some steel pennies that probably would not work. And new pennies are no longer pure copper - they would be worth a lot more than $0.01 if melted down.
            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

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            • #7
              I have a collection of these, maybe 20 or 25 or more from all over. I pick them up when I travel
              CPeter
              Grantham, New Hampshire

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              • #8
                Neat.

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                • #9
                  All we ever did as kids is make long penny strips by putting the pennies onto train tracks.

                  That South Bend penny is a nice bit of history. At least I assume that they don't do such things any longer now that the name was sold off to some Asian consortium.
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lee in Texas View Post
                    Saw that kind of machine in Germany, back in the '90s. The Sinsheim Auto + Technik museum had onebthat rolled an image of The Blue Flame rocket car onto a coin.
                    I saw that in the late 90,s, I was impressed... the liner not the coin roller..
                    Wife and kids were there a few years back, they were setting up the Concorde for display.
                    Last edited by 754; 03-26-2018, 06:34 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Magicniner View Post
                      There are machines in lots of place in the UK for doing that with current coinage, because the wording of the law refers to melting down or breaking up I don't think anyone gets upset about it ;-)
                      When I was a kid, every major tourist attraction had a hand cranked press that would emboss a commemorative scene on the surface of a coin. Recent sightings were:
                      Fisherman's Wharf (SF)
                      Disneyland
                      A Reno Casino.
                      Santa Cruz Boardwalk.
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                      Location: SF East Bay.

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                      • #12
                        Don’t know about the UK, but it’s legal to do that here, so long as you don’t try to pass it as legal tender.

                        I have a dollar bill that was shrunk by repeated wetting/drying cycles of pure anhydrous ammonia. It ended up about 60% of the size of a normal bill.

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                        • #13
                          The old penny on the track routine- yeah I've done that. I was amazed that the penny stayed on the track while every wheel ran over it. It was not recognizable as a penny after that, except for being copper still. No pattern remained, and it wasn't round anymore, but it was much larger.
                          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                          • #14
                            I guy I used to work with left his foot on the track, it got shorter, not longer..

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                            • #15
                              And then there is also the coin shrinking phenomenon. I wonder if a squashed coin will shrink back to its original size?

                              http://teslamania.delete.org/frames/...ergallery.html

                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

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