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OT, use of two displays with one computer.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Puckdropper View Post
    Putting on my Raymond Chen hat, I can explain why it moves things about.

    A window off screen might as well not be there. You can't interact with it in a meaningful way and Windows doesn't have the "come here" feature that some Linux systems have where you hold a modifier key and shake the mouse. (Raymond Chen would have mentioned the correct keys. I'm just wearing his hat.)

    So when a monitor disappears, Windows moves your window to the primary monitor so you can do something with it. It doesn't know if that monitor is coming back, it could be months before that monitor comes back again (think about a laptop connected to a projector) and by that time you don't want that window to suddenly pop up on the projector.

    On a side note, Windows 95 used to "minimize" windows by simply moving them to some very large coordinates, like 3000 by 3000. If you've got a fancy high resolution monitor and an older version of Windows, you may actually be able to see those "minimized" windows.

    More reading, straight from Raymond Chen and not some guy wearing his hat. (I'd never wear his tie, though... might get caught in a machine!)
    https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/old...8-00/?p=37453/
    I have never had anything open over in that monitor when turned off. If I am understanding, thst means this issue is not the problem.

    Nothing has been moved around for several days, despite use of the monitor. But then, I have not unplugged it, even though it is turnedoff.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrFluffy
    replied
    Originally posted by Puckdropper View Post
    A window off screen might as well not be there. You can't interact with it in a meaningful way and Windows doesn't have the "come here" feature that some Linux systems have where you hold a modifier key and shake the mouse. (Raymond Chen would have mentioned the correct keys. I'm just wearing his hat.)
    Keys? mouse gestures? I have them somewhere but I can just right click on the task on the taskbar and its got a option to move it to whichever display I want right in the menu that appears (I run enlightenment as a desktop on that machine, its famous for blazing speed, eye candy and actual usability tweaks).

    Leave a comment:


  • MrFluffy
    replied
    DennisCA, o/t but if you ever feel the need to move Symless is a great solution for that too. And it has clients for MacOS, linux, windows and a variety of other operating systems, along with clipboard support and shared folders if needed.
    Currently controlling two linux boxes, one windows 7 machine, a freebsd machine and a NG amiga running morphos.

    Leave a comment:


  • DennisCA
    replied
    At work I have two computers and two screens, but one keyboard and one mouse, connected over ethernet using a program called sharemouse. There's another program too that I think works better but I am too lazy to start bothering with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Puckdropper
    replied
    Putting on my Raymond Chen hat, I can explain why it moves things about.

    A window off screen might as well not be there. You can't interact with it in a meaningful way and Windows doesn't have the "come here" feature that some Linux systems have where you hold a modifier key and shake the mouse. (Raymond Chen would have mentioned the correct keys. I'm just wearing his hat.)

    So when a monitor disappears, Windows moves your window to the primary monitor so you can do something with it. It doesn't know if that monitor is coming back, it could be months before that monitor comes back again (think about a laptop connected to a projector) and by that time you don't want that window to suddenly pop up on the projector.

    On a side note, Windows 95 used to "minimize" windows by simply moving them to some very large coordinates, like 3000 by 3000. If you've got a fancy high resolution monitor and an older version of Windows, you may actually be able to see those "minimized" windows.

    More reading, straight from Raymond Chen and not some guy wearing his hat. (I'd never wear his tie, though... might get caught in a machine!)
    https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/old...8-00/?p=37453/

    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    The easy solution is to ignore the icons and put all of your programs on the Start menu bar. Make the Start menu bar vertical on either the left or right side of the screen. You'll have room for about 30 programs before the Start menu expands to multiple columns.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrFluffy
    replied
    I have 3 outputs on this box, but one to a perm connected hdmi monitor, 2 off to a input on a kvm and 3 off to a extender device up to a projector setup that presents as a display perm. So when the box boots, it "see's" the same 3 monitor hardware regardless if I'm running one, two or three displays. All of which have different resolutions.
    The kvm doesn't have to be switched to that input for this to just work at boot and be ready when I need it. Sounds complicated but I'm already running 4 monitors + the projector, so the kvm is a really useful thing to have. I have encrypted copy/paste setup between each separate computer (they have different cpu arch's and os etc) using Symless km sharing if you want even more complexity.
    All I really have to remember is not leave stuff I forgot on the kvm or extender screen when its not selected the other end, although the main taskbar is always on the primary monitor anyway, and I can bring things back to that display from that (although I'm not using windows apart from those rare occasions I need low level port access, but even then it works for me, ymmv).

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter.
    replied
    It might be a 'feature' of your particular driver set. I had an HP Elitebook in my workshop for several years with a second monitor on the wall in front of it. The monitor was more square than the laptop but I managed to get a comfortable balance in the resolution in the settings. This last year I bought a more recent i3-processor model of Elitebook to replace the older one and found that I could not do the same no matter how I played with the settings. Went online and found several similar complaints in the support forum but HP never offered a solution via the driver updates so I'm stuck with running the second monitor in a non-native resolution with a screwed-up aspect ratio.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    I'll live with it as long as I know the "why" of it, or a good approximation. I like having the extra screen. I am not sure if "fences" is worth whatever they want for it to me.

    The "instantiate new desktop" is a good point. Annoying, but I can see that being the issue.

    Naturally, if it was only that I had fouled up a setting, I would have been happy, but apparently I did the right settings (as I figured)

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Think about the fact that it's object oriented programming. When you change the monitor configuration, it is likely that it jumps to the "instantiate new desktop" routine. That routine must be able to handle the "first use" case where there is no previous configuration. The easiest way to do this to to rearrange the icons without regard for previous configuration. Typical OO programming flaw.

    You can live with it like most people do, or you can look for a wireless dongle that presents a virtual screen when the real external screen is not installed. I had one years ago. Don't remember the details.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by kendall View Post
    No it doesn't change what I wrote. The OS considers the combined monitors as a single display. When You disconnect one windows reacts as if you changed to a smaller monitor.

    ....
    Except that both the combined and the "smaller" have the resolution to have all the icons in their same places. The "Smaller" one by itself is what actually HAS the icons on it.

    I can kinda see it if the "fact of the change" makes the OS first default to a low res, and then "discover" that it is actually a higher res, so it compacts the icons and then leaves them compacted when it expands the res again.. If it does that, it is hidden, I never see the "low res" version.

    Of course, Microsoft compacts toward the top, and there are some icons I like to have at the bottom so they are nicely visible if I have reduced size windows, not full screen. I suppose that would work if I had them at the top also, but the cursor is much more often toward the bottom of the screen.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 03-29-2018, 11:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • kendall
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    The monitors are different

    programs are never set to open on the extension.

    Icons are never put on the extension.

    Does that change what you wrote?
    No it doesn't change what I wrote. The OS considers the combined monitors as a single display. When You disconnect one windows reacts as if you changed to a smaller monitor.

    I normally run 2 displays with a third larger one I hook up when I'm in the mood to game. I have the icons set to auto arrange, and keep the icons/shortcuts I normally use together in folders. That way when I switch monitors, They're all on one side and I don't have to hunt through for the programs that go together.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Amick
    replied
    That was good how you should all three options. And I sure don't see anything that I would change. But, truthfully, I love
    problems like this ... bulldog it. If need be, like some have said there are desktop formatting control programs. I have worked on
    this type of problem before and have fiddle with it so much that I ended up looking at two dark displays ... lol.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Amick View Post
    All graphic cards do it differently. Sometimes setting it up, you may not notice that it has made your main monitor #2. And it may have
    even made the extended monitor primary. And also note that on most machines, you can set the res on each monitor independently, so
    I suspect that when you disconnect your machine that what it considers its default monitor is gone and it uses the new and only monitor
    with a default res which is wrong.

    Sorry if this doesn't make any sense, just throwing it out there.
    Anything is possible until we know it is not....

    Report of aux screen when in use



    Report of main screen when aux in use



    report of main when aux not in use

    Last edited by J Tiers; 03-29-2018, 05:55 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Amick
    replied
    All graphic cards do it differently. Sometimes setting it up, you may not notice that it has made your main monitor #2. And it may have
    even made the extended monitor primary. And also note that on most machines, you can set the res on each monitor independently, so
    I suspect that when you disconnect your machine that what it considers its default monitor is gone and it uses the new and only monitor
    with a default res which is wrong.

    Sorry if this doesn't make any sense, just throwing it out there.

    Leave a comment:

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