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Shaper tooling, new keyway tool.

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  • Shaper tooling, new keyway tool.

    I wanted a keyway tool for my atlas 7b. After some measuring and thinking I settled on a 1" bolt and nut to serve as the base for my tool and the tool itself would be made out of 1/2bolt. So far so good. I hit the local hardware store and about 10$ later I had my steel. Now the hard part was coming, turning grade 8 bolts on a 10" lathe with HSS tooling and cutting same hardware with a 4x6 saw. Let's say I spent allot of time watching that darn saw, note to self get coarser blade. In either case, the end result is a slotting tool that should fit a 1/2bore and should be able to slot a keyway up to 1/4" wide and a bit over 2" deep. If I need more tooling then a simple 1/2 bolt can be purchased to make other arrangements.


    Enough yapping here are the pics.







    I will be doing a video of the whole process at some point and will probably bring it to this thread.
    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
    Logan 825 - work in progress
    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
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  • #2
    Nice job. It will work very well, I have one just like it and have used it for years.



    My first try at using the forum photo hosting, hope it works.....

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Optics Curmudgeon View Post
      Nice job. It will work very well, I have one just like it and have used it for years.



      My first try at using the forum photo hosting, hope it works.....
      HAHAHAHAHA, looks like twins. Great minds and all that jazz. Did you also use a grade 8 bolt? Man It was very very slow going I have to say.

      And I edited the video. I am exhausted and have pushed myself too far today. With that said I used sawdust to anneal my steel in the video. What is the consensus for this? It seems like it softened the metal enough to make it tapable.

      12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
      Logan 825 - work in progress
      My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
      Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
      Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

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      • #4
        I'm not sure what the idea was with the sawdust. Something that small has lost all its heat before it leaves the vice and 'cooling in the ashes' really only works for things the size of a brick. You never really got it hot as you were cooling it with the gas flame. The hottest part of the flame is the tip of the blue bit so by shoving the bolt so close you were wafting uncombusted gas round it which then burned on the other side and only providing incidental radiant heat to the part. A few bits of lightweight brick off a building site can make a flame surround that also makes this kind of heating way more effective.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Baz View Post
          I'm not sure what the idea was with the sawdust. Something that small has lost all its heat before it leaves the vice and 'cooling in the ashes' really only works for things the size of a brick. You never really got it hot as you were cooling it with the gas flame. The hottest part of the flame is the tip of the blue bit so by shoving the bolt so close you were wafting uncombusted gas round it which then burned on the other side and only providing incidental radiant heat to the part. A few bits of lightweight brick off a building site can make a flame surround that also makes this kind of heating way more effective.
          I have never done this before. I did some research and that is what was suggested. My first time at the rodeo for me. I may do as you suggested in the future. The steel sure seemed easier to tap afterwards. Maybe I regained my strength? I am planning on building a heat treating furnace and can probably program some sort of gradual cool off period as well. But as all my projects are gradual I only have so much time to build this shop.
          12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
          Logan 825 - work in progress
          My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
          Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
          Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

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          • #6
            I was wondering about doing closed end keyways by shaper and found these tips:
            http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...keyways-76177/

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            • #7
              I dont think grade 8 bolt would be hard to tap.. if you can drill it you can tap it, use a good tap.
              Not all materials need a slow cool down when annealing.

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              • #8
                You probably know this already, but these keyway tools operate best when pulled through the work, rather than pushing in conventional shaper technique. The tool will jump around less, better finish in the keyway. All you have to do (if it isn't already there) is drill and ream a hole from side to side through the clapper box and clapper, to take a suitable pin, say 1/4", to stop the clapper box lifting during the cutting stroke.
                'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                • #9
                  I cut with the forward stroke , on an unpinned clapperbox, on mine.
                  I would hold down the tool at the back with my finger as it cut quite often.
                  No prizes for leaving a rigid mount tool dragging through a cut in this part of the world...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                    You probably know this already, but these keyway tools operate best when pulled through the work, rather than pushing in conventional shaper technique. The tool will jump around less, better finish in the keyway. All you have to do (if it isn't already there) is drill and ream a hole from side to side through the clapper box and clapper, to take a suitable pin, say 1/4", to stop the clapper box lifting during the cutting stroke.
                    To pull through the work I need to reverse the motor as well as remake the clapper box so it is also reversed. Simply mounting it ridgit seems counter intuitive to me as far as surface finish is concerned. Will do some work with this tool next week, planning on turning a pulley.
                    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
                    Logan 825 - work in progress
                    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
                    Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
                    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

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                    • #11
                      No you don't. Just lock the clapper box and turn the tool bit around so it cuts on back stroke. Nothing else.
                      'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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