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  • A question about cnc mini mills

    There seems to be a large number of cheap cnc mini mills being sold. Has anyone ever mounted one on an engine stand and tried running it up side down so the chips fall out of the cutting zone.? Edwin Dirnbeck

  • #2
    Wouldn't chips then fall into the spindle?

    If you were to mount one at 90 degrees, you just might get away with it.

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    • #3
      Sounds like it would throw chips into the drive train for one, and expose the table ways to crap falling on them. Be an interesting sight to see though!

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      • #4
        Sounds like the answer....





        To the question nobody asked. ....

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        • #5
          I've seen a machine break routing circuit boards from the bottom

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          • #6
            Ummm? A horizontal mill is the better option. Peeps are afraid of the horizontal. Just a vertical on its side. JR

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            • #7
              Why not just fit an air-blast to blow the crud out of the way?
              If it does'nt fit, hit it.
              https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
              http://www.davekearley.co.uk

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
                There seems to be a large number of cheap cnc mini mills being sold.
                Lots of cheap mini-routers being labelled mills ;-)
                If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Puckdropper View Post
                  Wouldn't chips then fall into the spindle?

                  If you were to mount one at 90 degrees, you just might get away with it.
                  That sounds like a lathe where you mount the cutter in the chuck and move the workpiece. It could also be just a horizontal mill.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Puckdropper View Post
                    Wouldn't chips then fall into the spindle?

                    If you were to mount one at 90 degrees, you just might get away with it.
                    Who cares if the chips fall on the spindle? Any spindle can easily be sealed or shielded. The big problem with ANY machining is getting the chips AWAY from the CUTTER, it doesn't mater if you are cutting steel or aluminum or wood or plastic ,YOU NEED TO GET THE CHIPS AWAY FROM THE CUTTER. Edwin Dirnbeck

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                    • #11
                      Hi,

                      Well if we totally ignore fixturing issues, mechanical issues like clearance slop, and lubrication problems, you certainly can do it. But chip control is a rather easily solved problem even when machining in the normal vertical. And the other problems I listed either are greatly diminished or go away totally.
                      If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                      • #12
                        A little flexible compressed air nozzle pointed at the cutter zone helps blow chips away.

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                        • #13
                          A shop vac directed at the cutting zone removes the chips and cleans them up all at once. Compressed air makes for a big cleanup mess.
                          Kansas City area

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                          • #14
                            Vac and air. Vac isn't very effective alone in slots or deeper holes.

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                            • #15
                              My homebuilt minimill can turn the spindle sideways and still has an 18” work cube like when it is vertical. It works fine that way and would be very good for cavity work but gravity is nice for holding parts in place while fixturing. However the real reason I built it this way is that I can machine on the end of a 20 ft. long part because my table is stationary too. I actually have use for this in the products I build.

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