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gasket hole puncher?

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  • MaxHeadRoom
    replied
    In a pinch i have made them from thin wall tubing of the right inside dia. per #7 and used a hammer to punch the hole.
    Always use a block of semi hardwood, using ONLY the end of the grain under the material.
    Max.

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  • im#2
    replied
    Thanks gang for all the great ideas- the good part is this is all concentrated in one posting for those needing ideas . I whittled one out of a soft 5/8th bolt that works pretty good, tapered on the inside down to the sharp edge and my mechanic/ partner in crime in this project thought the taper should be on the outside so I might make one that way just to see- sure cuts a nice looking hole though, looks very professional. The grade 8 bolt was so hard my hss lathe bit did a terrible job of finishing it so that's not an option without better cutters!
    I will have some used shifting forks for an IHC 300U, and a 6L. ultrasonic cleaner for the carb cleaning delivered today by UPS, yes I am a tool nut-lol

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  • ken
    replied
    number of ways to make a new gasket.
    New way take pic/scan and upload to computer screw with it in cad/cam cut it on your laser cutter as seen on youtube gave no time as to how long it took. Was a lid gasket for a Colchester Bantam lathe. items needed ruler/scale camera/scanner computer laser cutter
    old way ball peen hammer and maybe scissors under 10 minutes items needed 2 ball peen hammers scissors other items may also need pensel,ruler scale, knife same gasket. ken

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  • kendall
    replied
    Different caliber shells, don't last for very long, but can pick them up almost anywhere there's a backstop.
    Buy those cheap HF style hole saws whenever I see them at garage sales/flea markets. take the teeth off the dull ones and sharpen them.

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  • MrFluffy
    replied
    Hand held whitney punch here with a decent set of dies. I have it for about a zillion other jobs too, and I think it cost me $30 secondhand some years ago. I almost never use something I have to hit with a hammer to make a hole now. Gasket material, cardboard, more holes in my leather belt, sheet metal work etc etc.

    Currently I'm welding new rear wings onto my van and punching holes into the edges so I can plug weld them in, as I don't own a spot welder.
    I punched a load of holes for cleco pin's to hold them first too.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    My father in law uses a small aluminum hammer to cut gaskets in place on the housing. Tap tap tap... and before you know it there is a perfect gasket. I think the hammer is a Snap-On part.

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  • Mcostello
    replied
    Has anyone ever wondered what to do with used bearing races? Just sharpen, no need to go into Hercules mode to hit them.

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  • Forestgnome
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeCB View Post
    Just to add something that I have found helps cut clean gaskets when using punches... back up the gasket material with a hard wood block made of END grain. Like a old fashioned butcher block table surface. Hard maple is the best.
    Joe B
    I use UHDP.

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  • JoeCB
    replied
    Just to add something that I have found helps cut clean gaskets when using punches... back up the gasket material with a hard wood block made of END grain. Like a old fashioned butcher block table surface. Hard maple is the best.
    Joe B

    Leave a comment:


  • fixerdave
    replied
    I was thinking about this with the CNC engraver I bought... could I make my own gaskets?

    Gasket paper is suppose to be water resistant. What happens if it's soaked in water? I've never tried it. But, I got to thinking... if it can handle water, then all I really need is some water-soluble glue to stick the stuff down to some hardboard. The same approach would work for any machining equipment. Stick it to hardboard, even laminate it between 2 sheets of hardboard, and machine it however you want. Why mess around with punches when there's a full set of drills to be used? Dump it in a bucket of water and pull it apart the next day. Gasket. Paper, but it should be able to survive being wet, right? It's a gasket.

    Of course, I haven't tried it, don't know if it will really work, and the hardboard is probably more expensive than any pre-made gasket I'm likely to ever need. But, whatever... sometimes it's not worth the shipping cost nor waiting. The last time I made a gasket by hand (yes, with punches) was when I mucked up the $0.99 pre-ordered one... was too annoyed with myself to just go order another. Might end up trying the above approach one day.

    Oh, and for the size I'd be thinking about doing, I could scan the part itself on a flatbed and get the picture into a drawing very quickly.

    Sigh... more ideas than time to try them out. Maybe someday.

    David...

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  • Cuttings
    replied
    Spending most of my working like as a heavy duty mechanic I have had to make a lot of gaskets for one reason or other.
    In your case I would place a piece of the appropriate gasket material over the opening and punch two of the bolt holes on opposite sides. To do a good job on the bolt holes I use 2 ball peen hammers.
    One that is very small so that the round end will fit well down in the bolt hole a ways and another somewhat larger. If you push down on the small hammer you can feel where the bolt hole is, then hold it straight and centered and give it a good tap with the larger hammer. You should end up with the cut out piece in the bolt hole. You will have to fish them out afterward which usually isn't much trouble. Put a short bolt in each one of these holes then tap around the outside of the the gasket with the face of the larger hammer. You may have to use the ball end for any tight inside curve corner. You should be able to tap around the inside edge in a similar manner. If this doesn't cut the gasket clean I use a good pair of small tin snips to finish it off. After that you can go around and cut out the rest of the bolt holes with the two hammers. That method usually cuts them fairly clean and locates all the holes perfectly.

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    My punch sets are made by Osborne and I value them highly.

    It is possible to tap a ball bearing over a hole to cut a hole in gasket paper.

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  • CCWKen
    replied
    I've used water pipe, conduit, cheap sockets and, on occasion, drill rod to make special sized punches. This is the first time I've heard them called "Wad Punches". I have two sets of the HF version(s)--One is older than the other. I keep one in the upholstery shed for leather and material. The one in the shop is used for rubber, leather, gasket material and insulation material. They work well but I use a slab of HDPE for a backer. I bought a set of blade punches but they're sort of flimsy. They're ok for softer materials. The set has square, rectangle, round and slot shapes in various sizes.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Thats a great price for that wad cutter one. Harbor freight actually makes a usable one also. And I have some paper drills that work well and are easy to make sharp. JR



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  • digr
    replied
    I make my own punches like you say, on the lathe, I turn the OD the size of the hole in a flange if that is what I am working with. I drill the punch all the way threw two using a drill two sizes smaller and sharpen it from the inside by using a center drill. When done I use a drill instead of a hammer. They work mighty fine!

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