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oil grooves on the lathe would you or not

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  • Brett Hurt
    replied
    thanks for the info Brett

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Summing up,

    Any machine needs oiled. Machines used for hobby purposes do not get a "pass" on that just because they are not in a commercial shop.

    If you slop on oil outside the saddle, and hope some gets underneath, it can carry IN other undesirable stuff.

    And, mostly, the wipers plow the oil off, to drip into the chip pan, unused, and wasted. If, of course, the wipers are even touching the ways.

    If you oil through an oiler that deposits the oil actually at the point that needs oil, under the saddle you know that the oil is not dripping uselessly into the pan. It is in, or at least passes through, the area where it is needed.

    Rather than being "plowed off" by the wipers, it will be "held in" by the wipers, keeping it in the area where it actually does some good.

    And, any that comes out, may carry OUT contaminants and swarf. That tends to clear off the sticky gray paste found on many hobby machines.

    The arguments for NOT BOTHERING sound more like sour grapes, and commercial shop folks considering hobby use to be unimportant, worthless, and not deserving of any attention, similar to the "I ain't makin parts fer NASA, I don't need no stinking micrometer", and "hobby users are just fine working to 0.005", there is no need for anything better than a caliper" comments.

    And any

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by Seastar View Post
    Seems to me that adding oil groves to a small lathe is a waste of time.
    My Logan's and Atlas are from the 1940s and show no wear under the saddles or on the ways.
    If they were needed they would be there already.
    I just oil the ways outside and enough gets inside to do the job.
    Why would anyone worry about this?
    But then, what do I know? LOL,
    Bill
    Its conceivable that DIY style lathe would, even over many decades, see very few hours. There may be times proper oil distribution seems like braces and a belt, or maybe its wearing faster than it should but not enough to be material (yet) with occasional use. It also depends just how important one thinks proper lubrication is - if things were always properly lubed there'd be no wear (in theory, lets agree it would be at least minimal). Properly mating surfaces wouldn't touch and would always ride on the thin wedge of oil. Its hard to definitive, i.e. let me get back to you in 20 years about how it went, but I think we do know better lubrication = less wear.

    There's also what state is the lathe in? A machine freshly scraped to perfection might create a different motivation to do everything to reduce/eliminate wear than 1/2 way worn lathe that is just ok. I haven't bothered except when scraping. In the examples above, I did the DSG compound, its big and I want to last after scraping it. I can't honestly remember if I did the Maximat, compound also fully scraped.

    Another reason is being able to create bit of flush. With zerks you can create a bit of pressure pushing out whatever oil and dirty oil is there.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 04-06-2018, 12:31 PM.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by Seastar View Post
    Seems to me that adding oil groves to a small lathe is a waste of time.
    My Logan's and Atlas are from the 1940s and show no wear under the saddles or on the ways. Your lucky !!
    If they were needed they would be there already. Not necessarily !!
    I just oil the ways outside and enough gets inside to do the job. That was probably the original intention of the manufacturer.
    Why would anyone worry about this? Personal preference I guess.
    But then, what do I know? LOL,
    Bill
    The benefit of oil grooves in the saddle is they act as a small oil reservoir as opposed as to squirting oil on the ways and running the saddle over it hoping that the oil will find it's way under the saddle ways. Yea it will but nothing is better than having that oil come from within the center of the way. Better to oil from the inside out than the outside in.

    JL...............

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Seastar View Post
    Seems to me that adding oil groves to a small lathe is a waste of time.
    My Logan's and Atlas are from the 1940s and show no wear under the saddles or on the ways.
    If they were needed they would be there already.
    I just oil the ways outside and enough gets inside to do the job.
    Why would anyone worry about this?
    But then, what do I know? LOL,
    Bill
    You got lucky.... You bought machines that didn't get used much. Not many of them available anymore, not almost 80 years later.

    Most I look at are obviously worn. Including mine. Don't assume all are like yours, they are not.

    It's no kind of a waste of time at all. Oiling from underneath avoids the buildup of the typical gray paste on the ways that you see on so many hobby machines, and some used to make money, also.

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  • Seastar
    replied
    Seems to me that adding oil groves to a small lathe is a waste of time.
    My Logan's and Atlas are from the 1940s and show no wear under the saddles or on the ways.
    If they were needed they would be there already.
    I just oil the ways outside and enough gets inside to do the job.
    Why would anyone worry about this?
    But then, what do I know? LOL,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Euph0ny
    replied
    Here is video from our member Stefan Gotteswinter of putting some oil grooves in a compound slide:

    https://youtu.be/PLs7wjpuU_c?t=7m48s

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    I did straight down for the v-way side.

    I wanted to drop oil in that cavity over the flat way, so I angled that one. That oil will oil both the flat way and the underside gib.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-05-2018, 08:42 AM.

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  • DennisCA
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    To put the outlet of the hole where I wanted it, which was actually under the crosslide ways on the flat slideway portion of the saddle, where obviously there was no way to locate an oiling fixture.
    OK it wasn't immediately obvious to me that the hole could not be drilled over a flat sliding surface and the hole chamfered, maybe there just isn't enough material to drill in such a spot or it just looks aesthetically unpleasaing vs. having the oilers lined up symmetrically.

    My saddle slides on two v-surfaces so I should be able to get away with a simple straight down hole. Depending on the thickness I could drill a 3mm hole first, then a 6mm hole for the oilers I have ordered and if the height permits it will create a small oil reservoir under the oiler

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  • Arcane
    replied
    I added 4 Gits cups to my 9" SB saddle and drilled straight down on top of the way grooves. I also used a hand held die grinder with a very small ball nosed bit to make little (very little) grooves on each side of the holes to act as small oil reservoirs to spread oil crossways on the ways.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
    What would be the reason for drilling at an angle? My idea was to drill as straight down a hole as I could, which was why I was thinking of the drill press.
    To put the outlet of the hole where I wanted it, which was actually under the crosslide ways on the flat slideway portion of the saddle, where obviously there was no way to locate an oiling fixture.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
    What would be the reason for drilling at an angle? My idea was to drill as straight down a hole as I could, which was why I was thinking of the drill press.
    The reason for the angle is so the hole coming out on the V way side is not elongated. If you want to place your hole over the center of the V than I don't see why you can't drill straight down. But I would take the saddle off the machine. It would be a good time to clean and inspect it.

    JL................

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  • DennisCA
    replied
    What would be the reason for drilling at an angle? My idea was to drill as straight down a hole as I could, which was why I was thinking of the drill press.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    You can get as complicated as you want. It is not necessary... And of all things to worry about the compound is the last, as it is typically not moved much. I think mine gets moved only for threading, and for turning short tapers (I do not turn many longer than an MT3, and not many of those)

    I have a Logan, which had no provisions whatever for oiling under the saddle. I drilled holes, much as you suggest. I did widen out a place on the V-way. although I suspect that was not required.

    I did the side toward the chuck. That was very effective, but swarf got caught in the oiler cups (I do not like ball oilers for this application, they are very hard to clean, and tend to admit grit). Later, I changed to a different (later version) saddle and apron, and when I put oilers in that, I did the tailstock side of the saddle. Less effective, but also much less in the way. To spread the oil, it is necessary now to move the carriage around a bit.

    Of course you clean off the swarf. But nobody would drill into the saddle without having it off the lathe, as you are drilling directly toward the ways if the saddle is in place. I used a hand power drill. That way I could get the angles I wanted. I suppose you could use a drill press if you wanted.

    Old saddle top




    Old saddle bottom. Note the bevels to wipe oil under the saddle.



    Typical Gits oiler (old saddle)



    Copper tube to bring oil to where it was wanted. Also shows the scraped bevel on the edge nearby, to "wipe" oil under the saddle ( inside the saddle, where grit is not present)
    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-04-2018, 02:55 PM.

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  • DennisCA
    replied
    Oh I've had the lathe apart before. I'd remove the saddle and drill the holes in the drill press.

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