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For all those who can't find a GREAT lathe they can afford. $555+10%=Priceless

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  • #16
    Originally posted by flylo View Post
    Pacemakers were made so the operator can do all the adjustments on the machine. I wouldn't trade mine for 2 Osama Ben Logans
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND
    THINK HARDER
    If your lathe never makes any chips it really doesn't matter what kind it is.

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
      We had a couple of Pacemakers where I worked and a bunch of other lathes. The Pacemakers rarely got turned on but the two Clausing Colchesters and the Monarch 10 EE ran every day. There was a reason for that.

      Lathes are a little like tractors. A guy once told me that you can buy a John Deere 4020 for less than a smaller JD because the smaller tractors are in demand more than the larger ones for the hobbyist and the real farmers have moved on way beyond an old 4020.

      Brian
      So tell me Osama Master Machinist why the Pacemakers didn't get used, didn't know how to work the gear shift? Looks like you don't read a rule very well & don't know what size MTs are. How many Osama lathes did GM have?
      I got it when you worked for GM they had how to run a Pacemaker & how to work a 2" ratchet strap & you missed that day as you can't even use a 2" ratchet strap unless you took lessons since you were here.
      You're right about my heath not letting do many things I used to enjoy but I don't shoot my mouth off with incorrect info just to p*ss on someones thread. You're also right about the tractors, a big tractor will do any size job just like a lathe but a small lathe or tractor will only do so much & I learned my lesson buying chinese crap with a 30HP chinese crap tractor. If you haven't got the hang of those straps I'll find a you tube for you. You're an all right guy Master Osama!
      Last edited by flylo; 04-04-2018, 05:37 PM.

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      • #18




        I know if I didn't already have a nice L&S, I wouldn't mind a Pacemaker in my garage.

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        • #19
          But look at the fun we're having = Priceless!
          Last edited by flylo; 04-04-2018, 06:31 PM.

          Comment


          • #20
            It has been around 10 years since I purchased my lathe (SB-9) but one thing I clearly remember about the prices was that the larger used lathes were usually priced at a lot lower percentage of their original price than the smaller ones (8 to 12 inch). The smaller ones are good for your garage or mine and can be run on 115/230 VAC. The larger ones need a larger building, which most of us "Home Shop Machinists" do not have and usually need three phase power which the average garage or barn does not have. The real deals were in the larger ones and in some cases the smaller, home shop sized ones were even more expensive than the big ones. It is called supply and demand.



            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            The size and power requirements for that would mean a fairly limited audience. Not all of us have that sort of shop and power. One helluva great deal though for anyone that can make use of it. Let's face it, that is scrap metal pricing. Maybe not even.

            But similarly let's also face the fact that deals like that only come around about once a decade. And more than once the topic of the wide disparity in regional pricing has come up. You being in Michigan which was in the middle of the industrial heartland means that even at the right price for your area you're going to find far more machines that are a small fraction of what those of us out in the styx are going to pay.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

            Comment


            • #21
              My idea is you need at least 2 lathes one small & one large but I have the room, the power & like American Quality equipment. In the back room of the buy I made was a torn apart south bend 9" with a taper attachment. My friend a retired machinist who has large SB Turnodo & half a dozen lathes just had to have it even though it was in many pieces & he found every pc & bolt. It was made in the '30s. I didn't mean for this to turn into what it did. I was just showing what could be had with a bit of effort but Bborr had to dis it with untrue facts. Should have spent 5 seconds on google & had the correct info. We're fine & know each other, I have his old Ironworker & he has my old Mill, no biggie & it's over.
              Last edited by flylo; 04-04-2018, 08:03 PM.

              Comment


              • #22
                Hey now, there are great deals on used lathes where I live, there’s an Atlas 12” lathe for 3800$!!!


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  The smaller ones are good for your garage or mine and can be run on 115/230 VAC. The larger ones need a larger building, which most of us "Home Shop Machinists" do not have and usually need three phase power which the average garage or barn does not have. The real deals were in the larger ones and in some cases the smaller, home shop sized ones were even more expensive than the big ones. It is called supply and demand.
                  Well.. I don't need a 600HP car or 1500HP airplane, but want both very much.

                  I built my first rotary phase converter back in '98, in my garage, for my Tree CNC. It was easy. But now we have 3 phase VFD's that run on single phase. 3 phase motors (and DC) are smoother - I prefer them in any lathe.

                  No doubt there is more demand for small machines. And yet I still see many nice small lathes at very good prices, sometimes dirt cheap and in really nice condition. It isn't mandatory to hunt for dirt cheap deals. Paying $1000-$1500 for a nice small lathe isn't at all unreasonable. I would not hesitate to do it, and did not hesitate (much!) when I paid $1600 for my well tooled Logan in '98. There is something to be said for hunting for great condition.

                  These days, in smaller machines, I'm much more interested in the 10EE.

                  Another side of it is wear. Many small lathes have limited lubrication and wear quickly if they see much use by owners who don't bother. Some users are oblivious to the risks of grinding on a lathe, or they just don't care. I see a lot of significantly worn home shop lathes.

                  And shipping.... Machines can be shipped. So the stuff about living in a machine tool desert? For most people in the lower 48 it just doesn't matter that much.
                  Last edited by Glug; 04-04-2018, 08:29 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Glug, I don't doubt you see a lot of nice machines for cheap. You, like all the rest that lord the lower prices over the rest of us are located in the middle of the machining heart of the continent. A zone that actually extends up into Southern Ontario.

                    Sure stuff can be shipped. But you just pointed out a host of reasons why it's pretty much essential to personally inspect a used machine to avoid getting a lemon. So I really don't see remote shopping as an option unless they can contact someone in the area they trust to check the machine over and to monitor the packing up and shipping.

                    I hate being a Negative Nelly on all this but the reality is that prices are very regional and remote shopping that simply does not allow for the proper inspection just isn't a realistic option for any but the most daring.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      The rule in these parts is....
                      If it can be dragged kicking and screaming into a basement, or fits a garage......
                      It's going to go for stupid money....
                      It's justvthd way it goes here, high demand.
                      Nice Harrison horizontal at an auction, around 1990... 4000 or 5500 bucks..

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                        Hey now, there are great deals on used lathes where I live, there’s an Atlas 12” lathe for 3800$!!!


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
                        No idea where you live?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                          Glug, I don't doubt you see a lot of nice machines for cheap. You, like all the rest that lord the lower prices over the rest of us are located in the middle of the machining heart of the continent.
                          I've sailed the inland passage many times. You are what, 2.5 hours from Seattle? That is not so isolated. You live much closer to major metro and industrial areas than I do. I spent 18 hours round trip road time to get my Pacemaker. Plus many hours planning logistics. With shipping it would have still been a lot less than a small lathe from China.

                          I see machines all over the lower 48, or within range of them, that I might want (and so much that I don't). Though I mostly try and ignore those that are distant. I definitely see machines in Canada that I would like - Dean Smith Grace lathes, among others, come to mind. I've given some thought to hauling one back. How's that song go? "Don't touch my lathe if you please, mr. customs man!"

                          I have never posted the price I paid for a lathe - except for the Logan mentioned earlier in this thread.

                          But you just pointed out a host of reasons why it's pretty much essential to personally inspect a used machine to avoid getting a lemon.
                          I don't play the lottery or gamble. I do buy lathes I have never personally inspected. Of my last three lathes, I inspected one of them before purchase.

                          I hate being a Negative Nelly on all this but the reality is that prices are very regional and remote shopping that simply does not allow for the proper inspection just isn't a realistic option for any but the most daring.
                          Oh yeah, I'm buying filthy old machines that smell funny. I'm soo daring! :P

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by flylo View Post
                            My idea is you need at least 2 lathes one small & one large but I have the room, the power & like American Quality equipment. In the back room of the buy I made was a torn apart south bend 9" with a taper attachment. My friend a retired machinist who has large SB Turnodo & half a dozen lathes just had to have it even though it was in many pieces & he found every pc & bolt. It was made in the '30s. I didn't mean for this to turn into what it did. I was just showing what could be had with a bit of effort but Bborr had to dis it with untrue facts. Should have spent 5 seconds on google & had the correct info. We're fine & know each other, I have his old Ironworker & he has my old Mill, no biggie & it's over.
                            Cheers. No problem here.
                            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                            THINK HARDER

                            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Glug View Post
                              Well.. I don't need a 600HP car or 1500HP airplane, but want both very much.

                              I built my first rotary phase converter back in '98, in my garage, for my Tree CNC. It was easy. But now we have 3 phase VFD's that run on single phase. 3 phase motors (and DC) are smoother - I prefer them in any lathe.

                              No doubt there is more demand for small machines. And yet I still see many nice small lathes at very good prices, sometimes dirt cheap and in really nice condition. It isn't mandatory to hunt for dirt cheap deals. Paying $1000-$1500 for a nice small lathe isn't at all unreasonable. I would not hesitate to do it, and did not hesitate (much!) when I paid $1600 for my well tooled Logan in '98. There is something to be said for hunting for great condition.

                              These days, in smaller machines, I'm much more interested in the 10EE.

                              Another side of it is wear. Many small lathes have limited lubrication and wear quickly if they see much use by owners who don't bother. Some users are oblivious to the risks of grinding on a lathe, or they just don't care. I see a lot of significantly worn home shop lathes.

                              And shipping.... Machines can be shipped. So the stuff about living in a machine tool desert? For most people in the lower 48 it just doesn't matter that much.
                              Our 10EE probably got more overall hours of all the lathes in our plant. I never ran it much but the guys that did loved it. If I were in the market for a 10 inch lathe it would be on my list. Even with their often problematic electronics, if they can be called electronics.

                              Brian
                              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                              THINK HARDER

                              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Closest lathes to me on that site are 2000 miles away and unknown quality. Rigging and shipping are going to cost way more than a new Asian lathe.

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