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Thinking I need some angle blocks

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  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by dryfarmer View Post
    I dont understand the puzzle how do you get even a 2 or a 5
    You flip the 1 degree block opposite way on the 3 degree block, such that it "subtracts" one degree from the slope. Do the same with the 1 and the 3 blocks on the 9 degree block to get 5 degrees. And so-on.

    EDIT - You guys are too quick for me. Going back to my corner.

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  • Erich
    replied
    You can nest two angle plates together two ways.
    One the small points together.
    The other they are opposite.
    In the first case the angles add.
    In the second they subtract.
    QED

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  • dryfarmer
    replied
    Oh you are stacking in the neg as well as in the positive, neat.

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  • dryfarmer
    replied
    I dont understand the puzzle how do you get even a 2 or a 5

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  • old mart
    replied
    Half a degree is a pretty coarse resolution, no good at all if you want to make Morse tapers, tapered gibs and the like. Sine bars and slips (gauge blocks) are the way to go.
    For home shop use there are plenty of cheap second hand sine bars on eBay and a box of old slip gauges will do fine. The slip gauges at the museum had to have the rust scraped off them, but even so, a stack of four still reads within about 3 microns of their marked values.

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  • jariou
    replied
    Bingo Tomato!

    Congratulations! It's a fun little exercise.

    And, by the way, cubes grow much faster than squares. For example, if you wanted to resolve all angles from 0.5 degrees to 60.5 degrees every half degree, you could do it with only 5 blocks:

    0.5, 1.5, 4.5, 13.5, and 40.5.

    Thanks for the few than sent an answer. Happy weekend to all.

    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    0. I don't have to make angle blocks for my CNC machine.

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  • tomato coupe
    replied
    1, 3, 9, 27

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  • MushCreek
    replied
    I have a flat little 3" sine bar that is about 3/16" thick. It has a step in one end. I use it in the mill once in a while, and also use it to set something a precise angle off of the back rail on a surface grinder. I made mine, although I think you can buy them reasonably. I made a set of standards for all of the usual angles, and also have a set of gauge blocks for the ones I don't have.

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  • jariou
    replied
    That is still one block too many cameron!

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  • cameron
    replied
    Originally posted by RichR View Post
    You could do it with 6 blocks. 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 degrees. That would allow you to do from 1 to 63 degrees.
    1,2,4,8, and 32 will do 1 to 40 degrees if you reverse blocks as needed.

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  • jariou
    replied
    Hi RichR, I expected that answer. Good try.

    But I can do it with 4 blocks only instead of your 6.

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  • cameron
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    However, using the 2.5" base. you have to be off location by 0.043" to be a degree wrong. So if instead, you can hold position to around 10 thou, you will be accurate to a quarter of a degree. Pretty decent for general work.

    .
    It looks like hell if a woodwork joint is off that much, but OK I suppose for o lot of amateur machine work.

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  • RichR
    replied
    Originally posted by jariou View Post
    That makes me think of a little problem I figured out a long time ago.

    Suppose you want to be able to produce every degree angle from 1 degree to 40.0 degrees, what is the minimum number of such blocks that you would have to make.

    Of course, this is a "theoretical" question where it is assumed that your machining produces no errors that would add up.

    Please provide an answer if you like the challenge and I'll post back later with the answer.
    You could do it with 6 blocks. 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 degrees. That would allow you to do from 1 to 63 degrees.

    Leave a comment:


  • jariou
    replied
    That makes me think of a little problem I figured out a long time ago.

    Suppose you want to be able to produce every degree angle from 1 degree to 40.0 degrees, what is the minimum number of such blocks that you would have to make.

    Of course, this is a "theoretical" question where it is assumed that your machining produces no errors that would add up.

    Please provide an answer if you like the challenge and I'll post back later with the answer.

    Leave a comment:

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