Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

High friction material

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • High friction material

    I've just had the questionable pleasure of taking a long airline flight. It happened to be on Singapore airlines, who were excellent.

    When being served a meal, the plastic tray had a thin sheet of some rubbery material inset into its surface. Neither the plastic mini-trays nor the metal cutlery would slide. The surface was dark grey, looked shiny, and had a crackled or hammered surface finish. Not a sharp edged crackle - nothing special - just a gentle unevenness at the 2 - 3mm scale.

    If I let the bowl of the shiny metal teaspoon (SS, as more bendy than nickel) rest on the surface, and I pushed on the end of the handle as I held it near the horizontal, I would have to push quite hard - say, ten or twenty times the bowl's weight) to get it to move. This surface seemed to grab the spoon.

    This stuff would be great for surfacing the jaws of a mill vise, or using between the mill table and the work, or on a lathe faceplate - you name it.

    Does anyone know what this stuff might be, sources etc ?
    Richard

  • #2
    That must have been one hell of a boring flight if that was the highlight Try pouring some coke on a surface and let it evaporate. I think the sticky sugar reside left behind might excite you

    Comment


    • #3
      Maybe some silicone matting??
      I've noticed the same thing with my TV remote if I turn it button side down facing the table I have to exert a fair amount of force to slide it. The remote has soft silicone buttons, probably most do.
      It's almost like it's stuck to the table.

      JL.......

      Comment


      • #4
        yep. Most likely silicone rubber. Wife's cookie baking trays and pot covers are like that.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yep, it's almost certainly silicone rubber.

          Yacht chandlers sell mats made of it, and it works remarkably well at keeping one's dinner bowl off the cabin sole—but I would hesitate to use it on its own to hold anything being machined.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rohart View Post
            I've just had the questionable pleasure of taking a long airline flight. It happened to be on Singapore airlines, who were excellent.

            When being served a meal, the plastic tray had a thin sheet of some rubbery material inset into its surface. Neither the plastic mini-trays nor the metal cutlery would slide. The surface was dark grey, looked shiny, and had a crackled or hammered surface finish. Not a sharp edged crackle - nothing special - just a gentle unevenness at the 2 - 3mm scale.

            If I let the bowl of the shiny metal teaspoon (SS, as more bendy than nickel) rest on the surface, and I pushed on the end of the handle as I held it near the horizontal, I would have to push quite hard - say, ten or twenty times the bowl's weight) to get it to move. This surface seemed to grab the spoon.

            This stuff would be great for surfacing the jaws of a mill vise, or using between the mill table and the work, or on a lathe faceplate - you name it.

            Does anyone know what this stuff might be, sources etc ?
            I think I would prefer solid steel for mill vise jaws. I expect my pieces to stay solidly fastened in the jaws and the softer material would probably have a bit of "give" to it making precision just a word in the dictionary.

            Comment


            • #7
              It would certainly not be a good thing to use for lining vise jaws of any sort for metal working. The pressure needed even with a liner of that sort on an round items would see the item acting like a pressure knife and cut the silicone, or whatever it is, to ribbons within the first half dozen uses. Plus it would give way too easily as RMinMN suggested and make squaring things to the jaws nigh on impossible.

              In wood working that sort of mat would have a lot of applications though. The placemat stuff is often see being used as a bench mat to aid with things not sliding around during any number of operations.

              Comment


              • #8
                It would be useful for holding delicate surfaced items in a bench vice, not suitable for a milling vice however.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks all.

                  I suppose it would not hold up to the pressure in a mill vise, and no, Mike, I was assuming some sort of clamping.

                  Good idea - I'll investigate the marine chandlery sources - I've got one or two close by.

                  But, 3phase, I can see a TV series about some cranky professor who starts making experiments with whatever's at hand in all sorts of formal situations. Copyright hereby waived.
                  Richard

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X