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bought a 50 ton press - now how to get it home?

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  • bought a 50 ton press - now how to get it home?

    There are 50 ton presses and then there are 50 ton presses. Mine isn't super heavily built. But it's still a heavy bugger. I have a 5x8' flatbed trailer and myself and another old guy (the seller) to help. I don't even know if we can lay it down safely. There is no engine hoist where it is. At my shop, no problem - I have an overhead gantry to take it off the trailer.

    Any bright ideas about how to load it onto the trailer?

    It's a 50 ton Ramco. Looks like this:


  • #2
    It's like when you come out of Ikea and remember you only brought a two-seater!
    Use the trailer to bring an engine crane to the seller's site?
    Lever each end of the base up onto dollys and wheel it up a ramp onto the trailer?
    Block and tackle off an overhead beam?
    Any quantity of young people (students etc) around that can be bribed in sufficient quantity?

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    • #3
      Assuming you know it doesn't weigh 50 tons Take it apart as far as it will go and I'm sure you'll be able to manage it. Unbolt and remove the jack along with the cylinder, remove the adjustable arm. Looks like that might be everything you can remove but that might be enough weight taken off to be able to manage to get it onto the flatbed.

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      • #4
        Other than potential crush damage (resting it on the pressure gage or a fitting) I don't see why you couldn't lay it down.

        Doesn't look like it has an oil tank that could spill.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          Remove ram and pump, move bed all the way down to the bottom, then you can do the tilt/pivot thing right up to the trailer and lay it down. No problem with 2 guys. Looks only slightly heavier than my 30T and I'm pretty sure IRC that I unloaded it by myself.

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          • #6
            Whenever you go to get a machine, ALWAYS bring a supply of "dunnage wood".... by which I mean cut off lengths of 2 x 4 and 4 x 4 etc. About 18" to 2 foot lengths are usually about right, maybe a longer piece or two also for use as levers.

            They come in handy for propping up to clear handwheels, gages and so forth, and to jam in to prevent things shifting. Levers are good for lifting stuff like that press if too heavy to just lug by hand.
            2730

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Everything not impossible is compulsory

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            • #7
              I've taken my engine lift for numerous auction hauls. A dolly, chains, straps, wood, levers and a tool box in case I need to take it apart or disconnect it. I always take what I think I need to load whatever it is I needed to pick up. When I bought an auto lift, I took my Kenbota.

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              • #8
                As it stands, that press probably weighs at least 800 lbs and likely more. (Go check out the weight of wimpy Harbor Freight or Princess Auto presses of that tonnage if you doubt me.) Even with everything removed that you can unbolt, that press is going to be extremely heavy to handle by manpower alone so if you choose to go that way, be very mindful of not getting in a "crush zone" in case it gets away on you.

                I would advise renting an engine hoist to do the heavy lifting.
                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                  As it stands, that press probably weighs at least 800 lbs and likely more. (Go check out the weight of wimpy Harbor Freight or Princess Auto presses of that tonnage if you doubt me.) Even with everything removed that you can unbolt, that press is going to be extremely heavy to handle by manpower alone so if you choose to go that way, be very mindful of not getting in a "crush zone" in case it gets away on you.

                  I would advise renting an engine hoist to do the heavy lifting.
                  Somewhat similar: https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...00b353e0eb4c2f

                  Even at 500lbs., it would put a hurtin' on you, if it toppled.
                  How about raising one side and then the other on cribbing until it matches you trailer height. Then walk it on.

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                  • #10
                    yeah would disassemble as much as i could.

                    BTW very nice press you can tell that baby's built good.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Like they all said, "one piece at a time"
                      _____________________________________________

                      I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                      Oregon Coast

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                        As it stands, that press probably weighs at least 800 lbs
                        So you're suggesting he should just bench-press it then?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                          So you're suggesting he should just bench-press it then?
                          Or just a double arm curl to lift it up, walk over to the trailer, and place her back down

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                            So you're suggesting he should just bench-press it then?
                            I almost missed that! :laughing:
                            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                            • #15
                              Do be careful. Riggers are cheaper then doctors and hospitals.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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