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Linseed oil, boiled over raw?

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  • #16
    "Nothing but really sleek hair and a few extra freckles, eh? "







    is that the symptoms of arsenic poisoning? i thought it was supposed to kill you ?

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    • #17
      Reminds me of the Juice Weasel. Check out the juice combination that makes him invisible and able to fly.

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      • #18
        Contrary to popular belief, linseed oil raw or boiled, wet or cured has little resistance to water vapor. Tung oil is far superior as a wood preserver, especially the 50% polymerized variety. It also does not darken with age as linseed does and the cured film is more resistant to abrasion. The only down side is that some people are allergic to tung oil and it causes a skin rash.

        RWO

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RWO View Post
          Contrary to popular belief, linseed oil raw or boiled, wet or cured has little resistance to water vapor. Tung oil is far superior as a wood preserver, especially the 50% polymerized variety. It also does not darken with age as linseed does and the cured film is more resistant to abrasion. The only down side is that some people are allergic to tung oil and it causes a skin rash.

          RWO
          As in it won't restrict humidity changes in the wood. It IS poor for that aspect. But cured linseed does shed rain water and will protect from short term dunkings quite well if the finish is kept maintained.

          As far as maintaining an oil finish goes there's an old adage from my wood working readings.... "Once a day for a week. Then once a week for a month. Then once a month for a year. Then one a year for ever on.".

          A shotgun stock I've done in boiled linseed needs a couple of drops rubbed in about twice a year due to the use it sees and the degree of wetness our weather has around here. But as long as I keep that up it sheds water as well as a duck's feathers.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Mike Burdick View Post
            From my experience raw linseed oil takes seven days or so to dry - apparently not the case with boiled - boiled linseed oil takes six days or so to dry.

            Actually, for all my ranch out buildings I paint them using 1 part of linseed oil to 2 parts of mineral spirits. For pigment I use concrete dye. This "paint" seems to stand up very well and dries in a couple of hours.
            Excepting semi-arid desert, I'm not sure there is anywhere in the US/Canada where the drying time of raw linseed oil _isn't_ measured in months, at least when high-saturation levels are achieved. I've learned to apply it in early Spring and prime (paint) in late summer/early Fall. Even then, the primer may absorb some active linseed oil, retarding its drying time as well.


            And some advice I received from a house painter years ago:

            "Linseed oil is mold food: always add a mildewcide to it before applying (outside)."

            By the time I learned this, I had mold-spotted (painted) exterior wood all over the house.



            Linseed oil spontaneous combustion:

            http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...hlight=linseed
            Last edited by tlfamm; 04-12-2018, 03:02 PM.

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            • #21
              I've always used the raw linseed oil.........
              This can is probably older than I am.





              I've tried the boiled stuff a long time ago and it dried gummy and sticky. I didn't like it. I let the raw dry for about a month until I couldn't blot any with a paper towel and then I top coated it with Minwax antique oil finish. It works real nice with walnut..... my favorite wood.

              Here is one of my projects finished with the above described method.





              JL.................

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              • #22
                Go to http://www.popularwoodworking.com/?e...&rid=244304969
                go to blog and check "Flexner " and search for Linseed oil. All the advise you need or ask.
                Hilmar

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                • #23
                  i thought i would copy and paste this from here: https://americanlongrifles.org/forum...?topic=12666.0

                  Rolfkt,

                  You really should have waited to add the egg shells until after you cooked the lead into the oil.

                  When you heat the oil with the lead compound the organic acids in the linseed oil will break down the lead compound and convert it to lead linoleate.
                  If you neutralize the organic acids before the oil gets a chance to react with the lead compound you get very little lead incorporated into the oil as a dryer metal.

                  Then once the oil's organic acids react with the lead you would add the egg shells to "kill", or neutralize, any excess organic acids left in the oil.
                  Any excess of organic acids after cooking in the lead will slow the drying rate.

                  The boiled oil film, on the wood, "drys" by absorbing oxygen from the air. With a lead dryer metal oil this rate will be influenced by temperature and the presence of ultra-violet light along with air flow around the surface of the oil film.

                  Once the temperature starts to fall below 60 degrees F the rate of drying slows down. If the air is not moving over the surface of the oil film it will initially pick up oxygen but then when the oxygen content of the air in contact with the film falls it will be starved for oxygen.

                  Ultra-violet light acts as something of a catalyst in the drying of the oil.

                  Manganese dryer metal oil films are very sensitive to relative humidity when it comes to speed of drying. With a manganese, or cobalt, dryer oil film is subject to a relative humidity in excess of 60% the drying rate slows in proportion to the amount of humidity over 60%.
                  Lead based oil films are not sensitive to relative humidity. The level of relative humidity has no real effect on the drying rates with a lead based oil.

                  Manganese and cobalt oil films are commonly called surface drying films. The surface drys first and then drying proceeds from the surface to the base of the oil film. Lead based oils are known as "through" drying. The film drys relative uniform from the surface to the base of the film at the same time.

                  If you can find it in an artist supply store you might want to think of Venice Turpentine if you must thin the oil at any time. This would be in preference to the use of "Gum Turpentine".

                  If you make any more batches of boiled oil. When the oil begins to foam, showing a reaction with the lead during heating, you should skim off any scum that forms on the surface of the hot oil. If the scum forming in cooking is incorporated back into the oil it will slow drying and sometimes give sticky films on wood.


                  E. Ogre

                  I presume modern boiled linseed oils are not using lead but rather some other material. but i presume it hasn't been that long ago since the change over. 40 year old cans of boiled linseed oil are likely no longer FDA compliant...

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                  • #24
                    Whatever they are, it's not something you want in contact with food.

                    BLO should be rubbed in, then wiped off with a clean rag after 20 minutes to prevent the sticky situation described above. I personally use shellac quite a lot, and if not shellac I use an oil/wax finish I made myself. It's raw and boiled linseed oil both, beeswax and carnauba wax mixed with mineral spirits. It's a liquid consistency and I wipe it on and rub it in with a rag.

                    I also had the sam maloof style blend once, which is what I believe was referenced to with the flexner link, but it set up on me.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                      "Nothing but really sleek hair and a few extra freckles, eh? "







                      is that the symptoms of arsenic poisoning? i thought it was supposed to kill you ?
                      There are apparently people who can eat arsenic in gradually increasing quantities without ill effects, and one of the signs is really sleek hair - not sure about the freckles. Theres at least one murder mystery involving an arsenic eater who poisons someone else's food with fatal effects, but eats it himself with no ill effects. Do not try this at home folks!
                      'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                      • #26
                        Fwiiw - I use RAW linseed oil on tool handles for gardening, for furniture, for ornaments, and it is generally much better than the more 'commercial' products - and lasts a LOT longer.

                        Here in an Australian summer it seems to dry in about 2 days. A cold foggy UK winter day might be a bit slower...

                        Cheers
                        Roger

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                        • #27
                          What I have been doing with the tank is basically pouring in the linseed oil and push it around till it covers the bottom of the tank. After that soaks in I tip the tank on another of its 5 sides and repeat. So I am not so much wiping or brushing the oil on but more pour it on and let it soak in. I am going for the saturated effect.
                          Andy

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                            There are apparently people who can eat arsenic in gradually increasing quantities without ill effects
                            Other than Liver damage, or Cancer.

                            Theres at least one murder mystery involving an arsenic eater who poisons someone else's food with fatal effects, but eats it himself with no ill effects. Do not try this at home folks!
                            There's a Sherlock Holmes story that involves babies being killed by the sudden withdrawal of long term Arsenic administration.
                            Paul Compton
                            www.morini-mania.co.uk
                            http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by johansen View Post
                              i thought i would copy and paste this from here: https://americanlongrifles.org/forum...?topic=12666.0




                              I presume modern boiled linseed oils are not using lead but rather some other material. but i presume it hasn't been that long ago since the change over. 40 year old cans of boiled linseed oil are likely no longer FDA compliant...
                              Linseed oil based paint has had quite a resurgence in popularity. Titanium dioxide is used in place of Lead.
                              Paul Compton
                              www.morini-mania.co.uk
                              http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by EVguru View Post
                                Linseed oil based paint has had quite a resurgence in popularity. Titanium dioxide is used in place of Lead.
                                Titanium dioxide is a bright white substance, insoluble in oil, and is the pigment used today in most white paints. It has replaced the pigment previously used in white paints, white lead, which is lead carbonate. White lead is also insoluble in oil.

                                Also used in paints was a lead oxide, red lead, which gave a very effective red rustproofing and marine antifouling paint. A pigment, insoluble in oil.

                                The lead driers previously used in paints or in linseed oil were organic lead compounds which were soluble in oil and were used in far lower concentrations.

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