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Linseed oil, boiled over raw?

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    it does make sense that if the boiled dries faster than the raw then the boiled is the one you really have to watch out for,

    I would not take a chance either way though, it wet leaves can take off on their own a oil soaked rag of linseed oil can too boiled or not...

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  • redgrouse
    replied
    From : -

    Machine
    Senior Member
    Not sure of the right answer. But one little gotcha with boiled linseed oil is that it can cause rags to catch fire. It gives off heat as it dries in air (apparently). And under the right circumstances it can combust. Search it on YouTube and you'll see videos of it. I was surprised about it because I have some in my household. So watch out for that.

    Yes the same mixed with sawdust ! often used to mop up a spill which is fine but make sure its moved to a safe location outside any buildings , actually it makes little difference raw or boiled same resultant danger.
    Last edited by redgrouse; 04-14-2018, 04:11 PM.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    FWIW there's all kinds of things to consider when making decisions about your health and id just like to throw some perspective into the mix, there are certain tribes that are still in existence and have been studied that eat as much as 10 times the dietary fiber that the average american does, and things like high blood pressure and colon cancer amongst dozens of other common ailments including chronic inflammation are non-existent and largely attributed to the massive amounts of fiber, in comparison to us who on the average fall way short of even the USRDA recommendation - which is way low to begin with,

    and yeah not having an office job and getting some exercise probably helps them allot too lol

    So again FWIW if your considering adding more fiber to your diet there are all kinds of foods that can help - oats for example, medically proven to do good things for your heart/blood pressure/cholesterol levels and all the above due to increasing your fiber levels and
    all the bennies that go with it, but here's a little fun fact about oats, while just 4oz. contain 20% of the USRDA of dietary fiber, which is not too shabby, ----------------- when you compare them to flax they look like a slouch, just 1oz of ground flax contains almost twice that at 35% that's incredible and like i say the oils and the fact that the fractured shell has some of that serious stuff that grandma used to call "roughage" makes it even more amazing.

    I do mix mine with oats, and between the two of them I almost got the entire USRDA of fiber covered just in breakfast alone... the rest of the day is just a bonus.

    So yeah weigh it all out - against the proven tens of millions suffering from all kinds of ailments due to not getting enough of a pretty inert but very important ingredient,

    or all the ones dropping dead from cyanide poisoning who have been using flax for centuries - I really don't have any examples although im sure if you search you may find some guy who ingested 10 lb's of it in a single sitting which would be impossible to begin with and more likely would die from blowing up his gut when it all expanded,

    maybe it's good that it's not arsenic cuz my understanding is that it's accumulative - and cyanide either gets the job done or you move on with your life lol

    just a little food for thought, everything in moderation - except for fiber - then you got to kind of take a more proactive approach...

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    FT maybe the stuff effect ones memory - lol I seriously thought arsenic was the concern but it appears it's cyanide,

    oh well at least i had it linked with another poison that could kill you,

    I agree don't go too overboard, I actually have in the past with no real side effects but have tapered things down some,
    technically there's legitimate "worry" in just about anything you eat - potatoes create a proven cancer causing ingredient when cooked, lots of good healthy vegetables can contain trace amounts of certain toxins or poisons or interfere with proper enzyme productions or on and on...
    but good point "most" everything in moderation and some not at all - like trans fats --- not a damn thing good about them,
    and you might want to stay away from eating totally blackened charred food - not a good idea there either...

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    there are some on-line alarmist sites that say to be careful with it because it contains arsenic - all i can say is iv ate it by the bucketfull for the past dozen years and no symptoms of accumulative arsenic poisoning...
    Not to nitpick, but that's the kind of faulty logic you normally argue against, Boomer. That's like the guy that says "I've smoked a pack a day for years and I'm healthy as an ox".

    I don't know about aresenic, but flax seeds are among a broad group of plants that are cyanogenic. Eating large quantities raw could result in health problems, not least of which is cyanide poising. But, with most things, the answer is moderation and a balanced diet. Although it doesn't address cyanide specifically, this seems to be a relatively unbiased and reliable report on flax seed: https://flaxcouncil.ca/resources/nut...t-use-of-flax/

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  • JohnMartin
    replied
    Originally posted by EVguru View Post
    Linseed oil based paint has had quite a resurgence in popularity. Titanium dioxide is used in place of Lead.
    Titanium dioxide is a bright white substance, insoluble in oil, and is the pigment used today in most white paints. It has replaced the pigment previously used in white paints, white lead, which is lead carbonate. White lead is also insoluble in oil.

    Also used in paints was a lead oxide, red lead, which gave a very effective red rustproofing and marine antifouling paint. A pigment, insoluble in oil.

    The lead driers previously used in paints or in linseed oil were organic lead compounds which were soluble in oil and were used in far lower concentrations.

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  • EVguru
    replied
    Originally posted by johansen View Post
    i thought i would copy and paste this from here: https://americanlongrifles.org/forum...?topic=12666.0




    I presume modern boiled linseed oils are not using lead but rather some other material. but i presume it hasn't been that long ago since the change over. 40 year old cans of boiled linseed oil are likely no longer FDA compliant...
    Linseed oil based paint has had quite a resurgence in popularity. Titanium dioxide is used in place of Lead.

    Leave a comment:


  • EVguru
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    There are apparently people who can eat arsenic in gradually increasing quantities without ill effects
    Other than Liver damage, or Cancer.

    Theres at least one murder mystery involving an arsenic eater who poisons someone else's food with fatal effects, but eats it himself with no ill effects. Do not try this at home folks!
    There's a Sherlock Holmes story that involves babies being killed by the sudden withdrawal of long term Arsenic administration.

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  • vpt
    replied
    What I have been doing with the tank is basically pouring in the linseed oil and push it around till it covers the bottom of the tank. After that soaks in I tip the tank on another of its 5 sides and repeat. So I am not so much wiping or brushing the oil on but more pour it on and let it soak in. I am going for the saturated effect.

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  • rcaffin
    replied
    Fwiiw - I use RAW linseed oil on tool handles for gardening, for furniture, for ornaments, and it is generally much better than the more 'commercial' products - and lasts a LOT longer.

    Here in an Australian summer it seems to dry in about 2 days. A cold foggy UK winter day might be a bit slower...

    Cheers
    Roger

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    "Nothing but really sleek hair and a few extra freckles, eh? "







    is that the symptoms of arsenic poisoning? i thought it was supposed to kill you ?
    There are apparently people who can eat arsenic in gradually increasing quantities without ill effects, and one of the signs is really sleek hair - not sure about the freckles. Theres at least one murder mystery involving an arsenic eater who poisons someone else's food with fatal effects, but eats it himself with no ill effects. Do not try this at home folks!

    Leave a comment:


  • DennisCA
    replied
    Whatever they are, it's not something you want in contact with food.

    BLO should be rubbed in, then wiped off with a clean rag after 20 minutes to prevent the sticky situation described above. I personally use shellac quite a lot, and if not shellac I use an oil/wax finish I made myself. It's raw and boiled linseed oil both, beeswax and carnauba wax mixed with mineral spirits. It's a liquid consistency and I wipe it on and rub it in with a rag.

    I also had the sam maloof style blend once, which is what I believe was referenced to with the flexner link, but it set up on me.

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  • johansen
    replied
    i thought i would copy and paste this from here: https://americanlongrifles.org/forum...?topic=12666.0

    Rolfkt,

    You really should have waited to add the egg shells until after you cooked the lead into the oil.

    When you heat the oil with the lead compound the organic acids in the linseed oil will break down the lead compound and convert it to lead linoleate.
    If you neutralize the organic acids before the oil gets a chance to react with the lead compound you get very little lead incorporated into the oil as a dryer metal.

    Then once the oil's organic acids react with the lead you would add the egg shells to "kill", or neutralize, any excess organic acids left in the oil.
    Any excess of organic acids after cooking in the lead will slow the drying rate.

    The boiled oil film, on the wood, "drys" by absorbing oxygen from the air. With a lead dryer metal oil this rate will be influenced by temperature and the presence of ultra-violet light along with air flow around the surface of the oil film.

    Once the temperature starts to fall below 60 degrees F the rate of drying slows down. If the air is not moving over the surface of the oil film it will initially pick up oxygen but then when the oxygen content of the air in contact with the film falls it will be starved for oxygen.

    Ultra-violet light acts as something of a catalyst in the drying of the oil.

    Manganese dryer metal oil films are very sensitive to relative humidity when it comes to speed of drying. With a manganese, or cobalt, dryer oil film is subject to a relative humidity in excess of 60% the drying rate slows in proportion to the amount of humidity over 60%.
    Lead based oil films are not sensitive to relative humidity. The level of relative humidity has no real effect on the drying rates with a lead based oil.

    Manganese and cobalt oil films are commonly called surface drying films. The surface drys first and then drying proceeds from the surface to the base of the oil film. Lead based oils are known as "through" drying. The film drys relative uniform from the surface to the base of the film at the same time.

    If you can find it in an artist supply store you might want to think of Venice Turpentine if you must thin the oil at any time. This would be in preference to the use of "Gum Turpentine".

    If you make any more batches of boiled oil. When the oil begins to foam, showing a reaction with the lead during heating, you should skim off any scum that forms on the surface of the hot oil. If the scum forming in cooking is incorporated back into the oil it will slow drying and sometimes give sticky films on wood.


    E. Ogre

    I presume modern boiled linseed oils are not using lead but rather some other material. but i presume it hasn't been that long ago since the change over. 40 year old cans of boiled linseed oil are likely no longer FDA compliant...

    Leave a comment:


  • h12721
    replied
    Go to http://www.popularwoodworking.com/?e...&rid=244304969
    go to blog and check "Flexner " and search for Linseed oil. All the advise you need or ask.
    Hilmar

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    I've always used the raw linseed oil.........
    This can is probably older than I am.





    I've tried the boiled stuff a long time ago and it dried gummy and sticky. I didn't like it. I let the raw dry for about a month until I couldn't blot any with a paper towel and then I top coated it with Minwax antique oil finish. It works real nice with walnut..... my favorite wood.

    Here is one of my projects finished with the above described method.





    JL.................

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