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Is there software that can digitize a photos so it can be edited

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  • Brian_Concannon
    replied
    I have a free app that will do it for you.

    Go to www.123cad.net. Contact Brian. I will do it for free because the app is not ready yet for public use.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Really? Where does he say that? No where does he mention a 3D model.

    Perhaps we should wait until he can clarify just what he really does want. The first step in solving a problem is to clearly state the problem. At least, that is what I was taught.



    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    You all, except for Danlb need to take a reading comprehension class.

    He wants to turn a 2D photo into a 3D MODEL, So that it can be used in what must be a 3D CAD program to make DESIGN changes. Not just scale or change colors, etc..

    He will need either a step, iges, stl. etc. in order to do what he wants.

    Pay attention boys!!

    Leave a comment:


  • C_M_H
    replied
    I use Agisoft Photoscan to generate rough 3D models for design purposes. I love these techniques.

    Based on these renders I changed the design of the bench quite a bit.

    This was simply a sketch, so I didn't aim for quality in the scan.

    I used my iPhone for the pics ( better cameras and lenses give better results ), and didn't take the normal number of pictures.
    Speding the time to do it right yields some amazing results.

    The texture really adds alot to the scan;



    Here's the raw geometry. The blue squares indicate the solve camera positions ( where I took the pics from );



    Here's are a couple arbitrary views with the simple 3D model integrated;



    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    You all, except for Danlb need to take a reading comprehension class.

    He wants to turn a 2D photo into a 3D MODEL, So that it can be used in what must be a 3D CAD program to make DESIGN changes. Not just scale or change colors, etc..

    He will need either a step, iges, stl. etc. in order to do what he wants.

    Pay attention boys!!
    See post #2

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter.
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    You all, except for Danlb need to take a reading comprehension class.

    He wants to turn a 2D photo into a 3D MODEL, So that it can be used in what must be a 3D CAD program to make DESIGN changes. Not just scale or change colors, etc..

    He will need either a step, iges, stl. etc. in order to do what he wants.

    Pay attention boys!!
    Add yourself to the list because the technique I suggested produces just what (you say) he wants.

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    I have Cutting Shop from Arbor Image.

    www.arborimage.com/cutgshop.htm

    It converts raster images to vector, DXF, for manipulation in CAD. The nicest thing about it is it doesn't give you a billion short line segments like most raster to vector conversions do.

    As you might expect it does its best job with black and white line drawings. I don't recall ever needing to convert a photo.

    Originally I bought it when I was doing architectural detailing and the pencil sketches I was working from, like for a finial, were at best not always symmetric side to side. I could convert the sketch to CAD and give the architect a choice of which side profile of the finial he wanted.

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by Peter. View Post
    We do this with sketchup all the time as a visual aid to showing sequences of work. We take a plan drawing of a building, scan it and crop it to the boundary size, draw a box in sketchup the actual size of the boundary and set the scanned drawing as a background. Now you can spend a bit of time in sketchup drawing over the lines in the drawing to produce features you can pull up out of the floor. There's no reason why you could not do the same for an elevation.
    I also do this with both Sketchup and DesignCAD. Import the image, scale it, and "trace" over it to produce the model. In the case of a house I'd bring it 1st into Photoshop to use transforms to eliminate perspective artifacts.

    Leave a comment:


  • softtail
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    You all, except for Danlb need to take a reading comprehension class.
    Pay attention boys!!
    The boys are fine. Show me where the op says he wants to change 2d into 3d. Vague post.

    Leave a comment:


  • greystone
    replied
    As black forest said..

    The op wants a reasonable, good, 3d model that can be edited from a flat pic.
    Cannot be done.

    From 2 cameras still pics offset by a known amount, a 3d model is easily built, and with very advanced sw not currently available, might make good 3d models.
    Such sw is not for sale in 2018 at any price.
    Note *good models* as in reasonable size in terms of MB, pixels, hexels, tesseracts and somewhat correct geometry.

    The problem is that any real photo will be seen with noise.. and an attempt to digitise the noise results in vast numbers of "dust particles" or artefacts.
    So eg a flat wall with uneven paint = 100% of all surfaces (just a Q of quality and resolution) will not become a flat surface but 100M pixels next to a wall with 200M bumps.

    Endless teams with robotics, military, automation, self-driving cars, etc. are trying to improve this.
    The real problem is that any good sw needs to be able to identify context and apply real-world rules to it, fairly well.

    It might be that brute-force and some sw may solve it in the near future.
    It might be possible for sw to quantify everything in a high-res pic in hexels (3d pixels, possibly with attributes like colour).
    This might require around 1000-10.000 M objects from a 2k modern good high res picture (my Sony NEX 7 24M real pixels is one).
    The current best 3d processors are graphics cards with parallel soft-programmed processors.
    My NVIDIA 500 and 1000 cards, driving 2 2800x1200 displays, are an example.
    About 150 processors on the newer better one, iirc.
    It is still 2-3 gens behind the sota in processing power (2k$+ for the best cards).

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    You all, except for Danlb need to take a reading comprehension class.

    He wants to turn a 2D photo into a 3D MODEL, So that it can be used in what must be a 3D CAD program to make DESIGN changes. Not just scale or change colors, etc..

    He will need either a step, iges, stl. etc. in order to do what he wants.

    Pay attention boys!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    That is what almost every digital painting program does. But the learning curve may be steep. If you want to move existing features around or copy and paste them, then that is fairly simple. But if you want to add new features, like a different kind of window or roof, then you are going to need to learn how to PAINT.

    Microsoft Paint will do what you want and it is probably the easiest one to learn. But it is probably the most limited. It is very likely already on your computer so it is "free".

    Paint.net is a better, basic program that has more features and it is also free.

    Photoshop is the most often cited program for manipulating pictures but it has a lot of features and can take some time to learn and even more to master. You can do almost anything with it. The price is steep but you may be able to buy an earlier version or a discounted copy.

    There are many, many more. The operative search terms are "paint", "photo", and others like that. Almost every camera maker has some kind of software for manipulating the photos that their cameras take.

    Also many CAD programs can import a photo and perhaps allow you to manipulate them. You would have to ask about them individually.

    You talk of digitizing the photo. That would only be necessary if you are starting with a print or a transparency. A digital photo is already digitized but you may have to change the file format depending on the program that you choose. Most cameras will store the photos in the JPG or JPEG format and most programs can accept them in that format. If you do actually need to digitize a printed photo then one of those five-in-one printers will be able to scan it and convert it to a photo format, probably JPG.

    Your choice of program may depend on exactly what manipulations you want to perform on the picture.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    I don’t want to sound like a dick, but your original post sounded to me like, “I want to type a letter, but want a piece of software that will let me edit the letter before I print it”.
    Unless you’ve been in a cave for the past two to three decades, you surely meant something else?

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter.
    replied
    We do this with sketchup all the time as a visual aid to showing sequences of work. We take a plan drawing of a building, scan it and crop it to the boundary size, draw a box in sketchup the actual size of the boundary and set the scanned drawing as a background. Now you can spend a bit of time in sketchup drawing over the lines in the drawing to produce features you can pull up out of the floor. There's no reason why you could not do the same for an elevation.

    Leave a comment:


  • nc5a
    replied
    Yeah, you guys are right, my title and the body of my post didn't match. Some saw through the mismatch, thanks for that and the tips for software that would do the job.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Is there software that can digitize a photos so it can be edited

    "Is there software that can digitize a photos so it can be edited "


    What! Hmm? I must have missed a beat. Try what I use (Paint). So simple. JR

    Leave a comment:

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