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Treating polished brass

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  • Treating polished brass

    The "Little Woman" purchased a lighting sconce that came out of a movie theater. It is Brass with some polished areas. She has done a nice job of polishing where appropriate.

    Would paste wax sold as floor polish be a good way to preserve the shine? Other ideas besides lacquer to keep it shiny?

    Thanks in advance

    Pete

  • #2
    Why not lacquer? I found this online so not sure how well it works.My idea is turn down the lights.

    Seal items made of brass to prevent tarnishing.
    Apply a small amount of paint thinner to a soft cloth. Rub the thinner over the surface of the brass to remove any existing coatings. ...
    Polish the brass with a mixture of lemon juice and salt. ...
    Paint a coating of polyurethane onto the brass with a paintbrush.
    Last edited by flylo; 04-14-2018, 08:30 PM.

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    • #3
      I would think that paste wax might not get into small books and crannies, corners, etc, very well — or be able to be rubbed out if it is. A light, clear, glossy liquid finish is probably the way to go. Polyurethane might be too thick and might build up in corners/etc. how about a clear spray lacquer? There used to be something call “Glosscoat” made by Testors. I’d try that first.

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      • #4
        Renaissance wax; https://www.google.com/search?q=Rena...nt=firefox-b-1
        Works fantastically, items can be handled quite frequently without smudge, the surface can always be re-polished and doesn't look artificially shiny.
        Len

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        • #5
          +1 on the Renwax, or their competitor Walker Wax.

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          • #6
            +1 on the Renaissance Wax, best I've found works on paper, wood most anything & every part of a gun. The large jar on Amazon is the cheapest I've found & it last a looooooooooooong time.

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            • #7
              Paste wax is actually no tougher than candle wax. So it's not at all durable and I found it only ever had moderate anti tarnishing qualities at best. I think the Renaissance wax would be a better choice. For getting into nooks and crannies to apply the wax a soft bristle toothbrush works like a treat. Or if the handle is in the wrong place buy a cheap 1/2" or 1" wide paint brush and cut the bristles down to about the same length. And for "buffing out" the nooks and crannies another cheap paintbrush with fairly stiff bristles works well when "jabbed" into the nooks and crannies.

              A while back I coated a brass piece with water based polyurethane. It looked great for a few months. Then I shot a bunch of black powder rounds through the receiver and by the end of the weekend it had a fair amount of patina due to the byproducts working down through the pores in the finish and reaching the brass. If it doesn't get any darker it actually looks really nice. Time and more black powder ammo will tell.......
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the suggestions. She will order some Renaissance wax tonight. It is her project and she has fairly high standards for the finished product.

                Pete

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                • #9
                  The old brass Instruments like microscopes, Telescopes or Sextants where covert with Zapon Lack .
                  H12721

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                  • #10
                    Advice on suitable lacquers and waxes for brass clock components

                    Have a read of this thread:

                    https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/advice-...onents.151290/

                    Phil

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by h12721 View Post
                      The old brass Instruments like microscopes, Telescopes or Sextants where covert with Zapon Lack .
                      H12721
                      Zaponlack is a good thing, indeed. Thin, dries fast, stays well, easy to remove if needed. I used it regularly 30+ years ago to insulate soldered areas on electronic boards, etc. I still have a small bottle of it with a green dye. But it was brought to me from Europe. Cannot find it here.

                      By the way, does anybody know what dyes they used there? Must be the same or similar to those used in Dykem (soluble in acetone).

                      Mike
                      Mike
                      WI/IL border, USA

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                      • #12
                        My father-in-law worked in the repair shop of a musical instument company owned by Doc Severinsen. They used a spray on, bake on clear finish on polished brass.
                        David Kaiser
                        “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
                        ― Robert A. Heinlein

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