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Tool Time, What is it?

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  • Tool Time, What is it?

    Someone on here has to know what this tool is. It is around 8"-10" long and made of maybe bronze? The round head on the one side is a rubber material. It is hard to see in the picture but on the underside of the curved tip it has a groove/channel in it. They are also spring loaded. Thanks for the help.





  • #2
    I’ve seen something akin to it on the tv, I think it was pulling and working hat or helmet type stuff, like bowler hat or riding, however that’s just a guess as I didn’t see the tool for long.
    Could have been shoes, it’s a long time ago
    Mark
    Last edited by boslab; 04-25-2018, 05:01 PM.

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    • #3
      I'm not SURE that it's a stretcher, but it sure looks like one. It's designed to spread the working end when the handles are squeezed. The handles have a curve that works with that ring-thingy to hold them in position. I can see that used to stretch a leather piece such as a boot upper as it dries.

      Dan
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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      • #4
        It's a bunion remover, my grandma had one just like it, she would boil the bunion for about a half hour, then start working it with the tool, the tool does open when you squeeze it but then you grab it with both hands and close it on the bunion like you would a post hole digger,
        you get the bunion soft enough so that you can slice it off then you can fry it up in a pan... she also used it on achy corns - that she mixed with ham and made her own spam type stuff usually to feed just to the pets unless things really got tough.

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        • #5
          Not that it helps much but this was found in a random box of things at the plant I work at. None of us in maintenance know what it is or have been there long enough to know what it may have been used for. Only guess I had was for something non-sparking since the bronze material construction. But now thinking maybe water related for no rust?

          I haven’t seen anything on the machinery in the plant that this would be special purpose for and there are no markings on it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by oxford View Post
            Not that it helps much but this was found in a random box of things at the plant I work at. None of us in maintenance know what it is or have been there long enough to know what it may have been used for. Only guess I had was for something non-sparking since the bronze material construction. But now thinking maybe water related for no rust?

            I haven’t seen anything on the machinery in the plant that this would be special purpose for and there are no markings on it.
            You'll find out exactly what it's for a week after throwing it in the trash. Seems like it would be useful to pry a pipe away from a wall a controllable amount without marking the wall (the rubber bit). What you'd need to do THAT for I have no idea (welding the other end?). You guys pipe fitters lol?

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            • #7
              My father was a shoe repair man. It is not for bunions! My fathers bunion stretcher has a lot longer handle like an old tin snips. It had a steel ball on one lever and a steel ring on the other. The ball had to fit down in the shoe and the ring on the outside to let the ball stretch the leather. Used rubbing alcohol to soak into the leather and allow it to sit overnight clamped in place. Nice try but NO bunion thingee.
              DBQ49er

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                You'll find out exactly what it's for a week after throwing it in the trash. Seems like it would be useful to pry a pipe away from a wall a controllable amount without marking the wall (the rubber bit). What you'd need to do THAT for I have no idea (welding the other end?). You guys pipe fitters lol?
                You are right about throwing it away. I like the theory about pipe away from wall but the groove on the curved tip would be useless for that. I am sure that has something to do with operation or they wouldn’t have wasted the time putting it in.

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                • #9
                  If you used it to hit a bunion patient over the head with the rubber bumper, you then could take a single edge razor blade and cut off the bunion.
                  DBQ49er

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                  • #10
                    maybe your grandparent's grew up in a different part of the country? Oklahoma ?

                    although im not sure just how you used it that rubber pad was for things like yaws and goiters and I believe it was either for pressure or suction of them

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                    • #11
                      Something makes me think it's a bung tool form use on steel drums, or other containers that might hold flammable liquids. Those "horns" behind the ball are for hooking on to something to pry or to turn it.
                      It's not the regular bung wrench, but there are some oddball capping systems out there.
                      Jim

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                      • #12
                        Now I can't remember, is it squeeze a yaw expand a goiter or the other way around?

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                        • #13
                          This was ID’d over at PM. They are sprinkler head tongs used to stop flow if one is going off.

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                          • #14
                            ok, now we need to see you using it

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by oxford View Post
                              This was ID’d over at PM. They are sprinkler head tongs used to stop flow if one is going off.
                              Definitely sprinkler pliers. Usually found in the sprinkler room repair cabinet along with replacement sprinkler heads and wrenches for changing them out. I've never used the pliers, but have had the pleasure of using wedges to plug sprinkler heads. It's a very wet job and not as easy as it might seem to jam something into a flowing head. Glad I'm senior enough to not have to do that ever again, that's what rookies are for.

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