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  • #31
    I wasn't going to say anything but I lost a cylinder and spring on one of my gages. I loosened it too much and the pieces went flying into deep dark space somewhere. I just ordered another cheap set from Shars so it should be here in a few days. I probably wouldn't have bothered but it's the 3/4-1 1/4" I use a lot on the lathe. I'll just move the old set to the mill cabinet.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
      if you cannot grasp this concept then there's no use in further trying to explain it to you...
      Thanks for the insult AK.... I suppose it is to be expected.....

      Try the alternate method if your zamak bore engines get ruined by the big bad bore gage.

      I suspect ANY pressure is going to leave a mark on whatever you have, so use the side to side movement method. It may be more accurate anyway, it uses trigonometry instead of brute force. I'm not clear if your objection is to the mark or a size difference.

      I'd be more concerned about a mark, that might have effects later. The honing pattern is not very deep, and the size difference should be quite minimal, considering the probable accuracy of a transfer measurement like this to begin with. Direct measurements have a better chance of getting a good result than a multi-step process. First you have the gage pressure, and the chance of spring-back, and then you have the effect of tightening the clamp to hold the size, and then you have the measuring pressure of the mic.... lots of variables if you are splitting tenths.

      I have used bore gages on honed cylinders before (small single cylinder engines), and never have seen a mark. I do generally have some oil in the bore, that may make a difference. Or the iron in yours may be softer. or the ends of your gages may be rough or have defects.

      If that leaves a mark, then a standard bore gage or cylinder gage should gouge the crap out of the cylinder also. Or you really ARE gorilla tightening the clamp. Good gages need only a slight friction to work.
      Last edited by J Tiers; 04-28-2018, 12:34 PM.
      CNC machines only go through the motions

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      • #33
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        Thanks for the insult AK.... I suppose it is to be expected.....
        Oh so guess you expected the "gorilla tightening" insult to just go unanswered?

        start crap and you'll get an even bigger dish of it served right back at you that's how things work so don't go whimpering about it when it happens K?

        measuring things is kinda like machining itself - the closer you get the closer you get, if it doesn't matter much to you then just use your calipers at the end of the bore and call it good... if your getting by with that I think it's great your working on nothing but 1930's era Massy Fergusons, sounds like a great life...

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        • #34
          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
          Oh so guess you expected the "gorilla tightening" insult to just go unanswered?

          start crap and you'll get an even bigger dish of it served right back at you that's how things work so don't go whimpering about it when it happens K?

          measuring things is kinda like machining itself - the closer you get the closer you get, if it doesn't matter much to you then just use your calipers at the end of the bore and call it good... if your getting by with that I think it's great your working on nothing but 1930's era Massy Fergusons, sounds like a great life...
          AK, your whining does not bother me.... save it for someone else who cares, and keep winding them gages plenty tight!

          You gonna have a heart attack you be that upset all the time...
          CNC machines only go through the motions

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          • #35
            Thanks for the useful tips.
            I have found that the telescope gauges are also useful for setting the table saw.
            The tooth offset has to be added to the gauge,
            for example a 50mm cut from the fence needs a length of 50.6mm to the blade side on my main blade.
            https://app.box.com/s/d9x0p7fpdr8abutcwcfq7aiwnn34okjr
            (In this photo, don't worry about the fine blade being in backwards, as the saw is set to cut p-circuit boards.)

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            • #36
              I've always done the tilt-through method. Set slightly larger, swing it through ONCE with a light touch, and measure., It's important that you do it ONCE. If you mess around making multiple passes, you'll get a bad reading.
              Practice helps a lot. Ultimately, the way you do it doesn't mater as long as it works for you. Choose a way of doing it and get good at it.
              ----------
              Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
              Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
              Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
              There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
              Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
              Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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              • #37
                App Box photo doesn't work for me. The page is requesting Flash Player. They can go pound salt.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                  For larger bores use three pins - several calculators out there to tell you the final result from the selected pins. !
                  Can you post a link to one. I also have pins up to 3/4", can't afford any more.
                  The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                  Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                  Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                  • #39
                    I'll dig, but for now read and enjoy... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...diameter/page3

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                    • #40
                      Maybe not always useful... for example in checking a bore for bell shaping due to wear, but for most holes from .2 to 1.2 I've found its fastest for me to just use my little el cheapo inside micrometer. I've actually considered seeing about getting some larger ones myself. My dad has a set of larger inside mics that work sort of like telescoping bore gages except they are actually the mic. I used them ages ago for checking engine cylinders when considering how far to rebuild an engine. Another thing I use is a set of tapered "gage" plates with a radius on the outside edge. They work great on straight holes. Slide them until they are lightly snug and then mic the part that sticks out. I read all the comments about tenths in this thread, and to be honest for most things I either try to get within half thou or I machine and polish to fit. I rarely ever try to measure a tenth except maybe in setting up a vise or a machine, and I don't trust anything I own with my skill level to be that accurate anyway.
                      *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by wombat2go View Post
                        Thanks for the useful tips.
                        I have found that the telescope gauges are also useful for setting the table saw.
                        The tooth offset has to be added to the gauge,
                        for example a 50mm cut from the fence needs a length of 50.6mm to the blade side on my main blade.
                        https://app.box.com/s/d9x0p7fpdr8abutcwcfq7aiwnn34okjr
                        (In this photo, don't worry about the fine blade being in backwards, as the saw is set to cut p-circuit boards.)
                        :-) First off, With a wooden fence?? :-) Second unless you have a micrometer feed on the fence it must be quite the trick to move it a few thou. :-)
                        ...lew...

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                        • #42
                          Hi Lew,
                          Of course the telescope gauges are not for accuracy on the table saw.
                          It is for convenience of the handle, getting in the gap per photo.

                          On the woodwork TV shows they usually cut a test piece and set the fence to it.
                          Otherwise it is difficult to measure that distance with a rule for example to the edge of the tooth when bumping the fence across.

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