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O/T: The constant, that is the acceleration of Gravity. (and more, dont read)

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  • O/T: The constant, that is the acceleration of Gravity. (and more, dont read)

    Is there a constant rule or law?

    It seems to me there is. The constant is not logarithmic. It is linear with everything else also being constant.

    The gravitational acceleration, lets call it pull will be constant on earth. No mater the elevation.

    Different on the moon, but constant within its mass range.

    Take it a step higher Jupiter. High gravity field which accounts for the higher acceleration at the same rate for different altitudes.

    Similar to our sun. Gas and gravity, (on a fission level). We have all seen the force of fusion. The gravity of our sun is tremendous.

    So. Why did I post this off topic post?? To spur some high level thinking.

    You guys are too smart for your own good. Bunch of "Big Heads".

    That was my workgroups nickname for our smart dude. Big head because he was a large man and actually has a large head.

    And because he was the smartest in a six man workgroup on the USS Reuben James (FFG-57).

    Weapon system. An overly complicated one for the time. It was the Sperry way back then.

    We were behind the times in a matter of moments. That is unusual for the Military. But this was the virgining of the microprocessor and things were changing fast.

    Our system was real time, like analog. That is what is needed to figure out the Firecontrol Solution. Real time.

    Our memory was ferrite rings. Core memory that was fed by the reel tape. Then housed continuously on the "mainframe" processor.

    That stuff was all ET's equipment. I still had to learn it in C school.

    The interface between the processor and our system was very nice. It took up the deck to overhead and prolly 12 foot long. It showed the two data bit streams, I think they were 16 bit words (two words).

    And I am talking bits, not bytes. One bit at a time. Sounds excessive, the idea was to make it possible to troubleshoot the program as the firecontrol computer was going through a diag.

    The reality was we never had any problems with the software or the ET's computer.

    We might have had a few issues with the interface. We, our workgroup were responsible for everything after the ET's YUK-7. That went right into our I/O, that large interface "wall"

    Our main failure point was being in port for more than a couple weeks. Our electronics and power supplies had minimal failure when underway. We cant turn on the electronics sitting in LB. So when we would get under way and we brought the system up she would be great. In port PMS would have us fire her up completely, do or maintenance and shut her down.

    A system like that does not like to be triggered every day. It is had on devices. Yes, devices. This was the 80's, we had folks (big head) going to microminiture repair.

    It did seem like she ran through boards more at home in port. I think it was due to the cycling of the on and off. Not power spikes, just heat cycles. I jut think the circuits do better without the on-off cycles.


    Ok... I am solly for the long winded post. But if you got this far then you have your own issues JR

  • #2
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post
    The gravitational acceleration, lets call it pull will be constant on earth. No mater the elevation.
    NOOO!
    It's not constant even in different geographical locations. And not just academic interest but a real issue if you want to calibrate a scale/mass or such.

    "standard average" value for it is 9.80665 m/s2 but for example up north here in Finland 9.82 m/s2 is closer to reality.
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #3
      Obviously it's constant if you are a flat-earther. Your process is defective if it finds the value changes for different elevations.

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      • #4
        Its not constant in any way. It varies according to the position on the earth. Its direction varies according to proximity to mountains, valleys buried masses etc. It value depends on altitude. There are satellites that survey the earth effectively looking for local changes in g.

        And of course, this was how the anomaly was found buried on the moon
        Bill

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        • #5
          And of course, if we want to bring relativity into the picture, there is no such thing as the acceleration due to gravity. Objects travel along geodesics (straight lines) in curved spacetime. g is just a non relativistic way of describing what we see.
          Bill

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          • #6
            Can't speak on the physics but if you were still using "ferrite ring core" in the 80s, that was WAY behind the current technology at the time. I remember my first programming job out of school. It was at an auditing firm. Soon after starting that job in ~1973, IBM was in changing out equipment and we moved from card compilers to disk. They brought in three washing machine sized removable disk drives. I don't recall exactly but they're total storage space was less than a cheap thumb drive of today. We (system folks) marveled at the speed of the new system. It was something that could be beat by a PC by the mid 80s.

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            • #7
              Well! Any thread that starts with this quote in the first post:

              <"The gravitational acceleration, lets call it pull will be constant on earth. No mater the elevation.">

              I will completely ignore because the poster is obviously ignorant of facts. The rest will probably be of similar accuracy.
              ...lew...

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              • #8
                Military electronics are unique. Either they are very old tech for reliability, or pushing state of the art for performance. I preferred the challenge of repairing things when the components don't appear in any of the references. That was in the 70's with all discrete components, no ICs.

                Mike

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                • #9
                  I remember deriving gravity from the swing of a pendulum (as I believe it was originally done) T=sq root L/g, it stuck in my head, we had to repeat it in a lift going up down etc etc, it was quite educational, there are great anomalies (called that) on the earths surface, a real explanation seems to elude the physicists, or so I read.
                  Apparently causes satellite problems.
                  Regarding old computers I worked in a reasearch lab, one of the guys was tinkering with “tin whiskers” causing electronics to fail, he told me that at least 3 satellites had secumbed to failure probably due to the green solder aka lead free, he reckoned they propagate faster in zero g, makes sense.
                  Gravity always confused me, still does, I can jump up hence overcome the force of an entire planet, if the reaction I supplied to this force only exceeded it by 1 pp billion would I float?.
                  Sorry rambling tinfoil hat slipped off
                  Mark

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                  • #10
                    The rambling Original Post brought back a flood of memories. Let me add my own ramblings.

                    In the Navy I was an AQ2 -Aviation Fire Control Technician Second Class (E-5) The gear I worked on was the AN/ASB-12 airborne Inertial Navigation & Radar System. It included a gyro-stabilized, gimbal-mounted platform with accelerometers, a Digital computer whose only job was to solve for latitude and longitude based on input from the accelerometers, an Analog "bombing" computer that generated "real time" flight path solutions for nuclear bomb delivery and escape from the blast zone, and a ground-mapping radar for navigation system monitoring and updating.

                    The Digital system had to take into account Earth's rotation and "oblateness" (fatter through the equator than from pole-to-pole)

                    The system MTBF was about 10 hrs. on a good day. The digital computer was built up from discrete resistors, transistors and diodes and a very few early 7400-series integrated circuits, all on a multitude of printed circuit boards. Way too many edge connectors and point-to-point wiring solder connections on the backplane contributed to the failures. It had a hard drive, designed to (mostly)survive catapult launches and arrested landings and high-G force turns in flight, with a single-sided disk and multiple fixed read-write heads, each with its own dedicated track.

                    Rambling memories, indeed.
                    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                    • #11
                      Well, people responded.....

                      I was starting to wonder if "thermite/monarchist" had come over and hijacked an identity here, or maybe it was just a bad batch of Chianti.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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                      • #12
                        C2H6O
                        Location: North Central Texas

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                          I was starting to wonder if "thermite/monarchist" had come over and hijacked an identity here,
                          or JR really is monarchist?

                          i temporarily had the mig welder set up in the basement (more space in the laundry room, wife was thrilled lol). After carrying it all back up I'm left with the strong sense the force gravity is increasing
                          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                          • #14
                            Soon after starting that job in ~1973, IBM was in changing out equipment and we moved from card compilers to disk. They brought in three washing machine sized removable disk drives. I don't recall exactly but they're total storage space was less than a cheap thumb drive of today.
                            Those were the very first hard disks. They took 3 phase power and cost $10,000 in 1973. we had 2 in use at a NASA tracking station in 1994. Driven by Univac computers. you had to write your own OS. 10 gigs each.

                            a year later video monitors showed up. if you see an episode of the original Star Trek, note the absence of monitors for the one and only computer on the ship.

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                            • #15
                              Just to add some techno-babble, I claim that the earth is pear-shaped, with the southern hemisphere being larger, because it is sagging just like a water balloon. It's also balanced on the back of a huge turtle. And what supports the turtle? It's turtles all the way down!

                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

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