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  • #31
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    My old shop had a mix of metal and wood and there was just no way to avoid overlapping and wood dust on the lathe and a metal swarf on the bandsaw. And the drill press saw double duty as well so I had to clean the table with solvent if I was doing a nice bit of wood to avoid oil stains. So all in all I do sympathize on the mixing of materials. And it's especially bad if you're tight for room and still want to add a machine or two yet.
    Yes, 2 shops is really not in the cards... same deal with me & my drill press - at least I can throw a drop sheet over the lathe. Thinking more, the jointer is quite a bit more of an issue - a heavy curly chip caught in the cutter heads will pretty much ruin any work and future work if it chips the cutter (and the cutter). might even be a safety thing too, if the chip is long enough - your hands get real close to that cutter!


    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Be your space tight or spacious though I do recommend doing the "cardboard cutout" trick to lay out tools, benches and storage. In CAD is a great way to do it. But if you don't "CAD" then a big sheet of paper with the floor plan of the shop laid out on it and drawn to scale and all your machines, benches and storage cabinets cut out of file cards and then play with layouts. With this method I'd also strongly recommend you take a lot of direct top down pictures when you have any options that you THINK might be worthwhile. Otherwise you'll forget rapidly. Same in CAD, if you get one version that seems decent don't work over it. Copy and paste a whole new "shop" beside it and modify this new copy. When I was doing my own shop I must have had 6 or 8 different layouts that all had something worthwhile. All those ideas filtered down to one and I went with that. And this playing with layouts is even MORE important for a small area with too many machines and items.
    My big challenge isn't really limited square footage, in fact there is lots of it - it's the 'usable' area - being in the basement I have a 75" max headspace (bandsaw only fits in one location) and a lot of vents hanging down to about 65" ... meaning I do a lot of ducking and stooping to move around oh well ... one thing at a time .

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    • #32
      In the new digs I took on the challenge of moving a main sanitary run from the middle of the wood working machine room over to the edge of the room where I could box it in. This allowed me to keep my head space with the new ceiling. No chance of doing the same in your basement with the heating runs? Sheet metal runs like that aren't all that tough to do. And if you need to lengthen a run to where it's not getting enough heat up into the room it feeds there are helper fan units that fit inline. You'd just need to run the power from the fan circuit in the furnace. If you're there for the longer term it may be an option worth considering. If it's a rental then this isn't much of an idea. But if it's YOUR place then it may pay off long term to consider options and that no option is too crazy until you get the price estimate....

      In the meantime drop cloths for the jointer and planer that you use when doing metal machining sounds like a good idea. What's good for the metal lathe against wood dust is equally good for the woodworking machines against metal swarf.

      One good thing about a strongly sloping floor that makes much of the area unusable due to headroom issues is that you can look at putting most of your storage and stock racks into the less desirable part of the basement. I know this seems obvious and likely you're already on that. But a review of what is out in the more usable area might be a good idea?

      I'm also thinking that a hard hat couldn't hurt either....

      Sorry for all the rambling on some stuff that is almost certainly obvious. But I think building good workable shop areas is very much a whole separate hobby for me. I don't do enough of my own so I tend to swoop in and "prey" on others that even seem like they need some help.... regardless of if they think so or not....

      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #33
        unfortunately I rent, if it were up to me that basement would have been gutted, moisture issues fixed and dug out to a useful depth... hopes and dreams eh?


        I can't store material or even projects in progress down there because of the moisture - it can reach 70% in the Summer, (I have a meter) the foundation is so bad that when it rains there is running water. I have to keep a real close eye on my machines and tools to keep rust in check.

        It's the best I got - an enjoyable workable area would be much better for me and finished projects ... some day ...


        I was actually thinking one of those padded helmets that the Russian tank crews wear

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        • #34
          You'll get there one day. I started off with the closet under the basement stairs in my parent's house. Now I've got just shy of 1600 sq feet of dedicated shop area with separate areas for wood and metal. And with any luck I'll be around for another 15 to 20 years to enjoy it before I'm not able to use it.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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