Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Use of Morse Taper Reamer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Use of Morse Taper Reamer

    I am planning on using a #2 Morse Taper finishing reamer to clean up the spindle taper on a wood lathe. What sort of wrench do you use? I would think that with the square shank (5/8") a tap-wrench style would be best, to keep from taking it off axis. I've never seen a tap wrench that big.

    Plan "B" is to use a standard wrench and try to keep it on axis by using the tail stock center.

    Ok, you experts out there, Learn me good!

    ------------------
    ELB
    Ed Bryant

  • #2
    I've never used a morse taper reamer. I've never used a wood lathe. I've never used a morse taper reamer on a wood lathe. There, now you know as much as I do.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

    Comment


    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
      I've never used a morse taper reamer. I've never used a wood lathe. I've never used a morse taper reamer on a wood lathe. There, now you know as much as I do. </font>
      Blimey

      Comment


      • #4
        What a shock! I've learned more from this board than half a dozen books. I figured what isn't known by this astute group, just isn't knowable. (OK, maybe a little over the top there.)

        I have used chucking reamers, and various reamers with a morse taper shank, and tapered hand reamers with a T-handle, but with a regular wrench on this square shank it seems I will be cutting more on one side of the reamer than the other. Any creative ideas, if not experience?

        ------------------
        ELB
        Ed Bryant

        Comment


        • #5
          I'll have a go,but someone will probably tell you better.

          IF it was me,I'd use a spring loaded centre in the tailstock,slow speed and plenty of oil,retract with the spindle still turning.

          As I said it's only a guess,but use a light touch.

          Allan

          Comment


          • #6
            Well, when I did (to my mt3 tailstock), I put a center in the headstock to engage the center hole in the back of the reamer to hold it straight. Then just turned it with an open end wrench, while gently feeding the tailstock ram toward the reamer.

            But others have commented on this board that it's really better to just let the reamer center itself.

            The important thing tho is to realize that a little goes a long way! I didn't think I was removing much material, but now my tailstock 'kicks' out centers about 3/8" quicker than it used to. Just a little removed makes a big difference in the seating depth.

            Comment


            • #7
              Plenty of oil. Turn it with a long wrench. Feed it by hand effort alone if all you want to do it clean up an existing taper.

              If you need to move a little stock help the reamer along with the tailstock. I wouldn't use a dead center because wood lathes are anything but machine tool accurately aligned. Use a wood block to push it along.

              DON'T use spindle power. The minimum RPM of most wood lathe spindles is about 500 RPM and the reamer should be turned no more the 50 RPM. Stop frequently and clean the reamer.

              Take no more out than you absolutely positively have to.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for all your suggestions. I used the tail stock feed for pressure, locked the spindle, and went at it. I cut well, not too deep.
                Ed Bryant

                Comment

                Working...
                X