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cracked set screw

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  • cracked set screw

    I was taking a bunch of tool holders out of service the other day, and I couldn't get the set screw out of one in order to push the tool out. It felt like the set screw was rounded out, but the set screw looks ok, and a long handle hex key seemed to feel ok in the hole.

    This morning after firing up the shop and getting jobs cutting I took a look at it, and the set screw is cracked right down the side. When I try to turn the screw the crack widens up and the wrench pops around inside the hole. Its not a big deal I guess. These tool holders only sell for around $50 used, but hey. $50 is $50.

    Any suggestions. I have considered trying to tap in an oversized hex key, but its right there. I have a drawer full but I haven't found that one that feels like it almost wants to fit.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  • #2
    Weld a bolt to it, if you've got small enough welding kit?

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    • #3
      Use a drop of superglue on the SIDES of a sacrificial allen wrench. Let it cure and try again.

      Heat after it's out to remove the screw.


      Dan
      P.S. I'd try a slightly oversized wrench first. Metric and SAE are fair game in this situation.
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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      • #4
        Carl Ijames over on RCM suggested a tapered hex key (available from McMaster.) I buy 1/8, 5/32, and 1/4 inch by the 100ct box because I package hex keys with molds so the customer doesn't have to hunt one down to use the mold. (clamping screws, slidebar retention, etc) This set screw just happens to be 7/32, so a little work on a 1/4" on the belt sander to make my own tapered key might just do the trick.
        Last edited by Bob La Londe; 05-18-2018, 02:57 PM.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          EDM?
          Paul A.

          Make it fit.
          You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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          • #6
            A solid carbide twist drill of the core diameter would work if you have one.
            Not long ago I had almost finished a fixture which was to be tapped for 1/4" BSF in steel and snapped the tap after getting about 1/2" deep. I had nothing to loose by trying a 5mm carbide drill. I used the geared quill feed on the mill, took it slow and the tap which I had broken because the hole was a bit undersize turned to fine powder. Was I relieved!

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            • #7
              Left-handed drill bit.

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              • #8
                I have this happen at work about every 9-12 months. This is pretty much the only situation in which I've ever had luck with an east out. Works perfect. It's always the same holders too, 1/4" EM side locks, that take a 1/8" hex key. Can't remember the screw size now, #10 maybe? #8? (seems to small).

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                • #9
                  10/32 button heads take an 1/8 inch, but so do 1/4-20 set screws.
                  *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
                    10/32 button heads take an 1/8 inch, but so do 1/4-20 set screws.
                    Yeah set screw. Gotta be 1/4-20's then. I was thinking it was smaller than the holder diameter for some reason. anywho...give the easy out a try. Or sacrifice an allen wrench to make a custom size (maybe tapered). I've got half a drawer full of custom hex keys i've made for some special purpose (usually never to be needed again).

                    The LH drill bit is a good suggestion too. I've got a 1/4" lh drill I use for getting head stripped 4-40, and 6-32 flat heads. It's works great sometimes....

                    Ironically the UPS guy just showed up since my last post with an order from KBC that just happens to be a bunch of lh (6-32 -> 1/2-13) taps, and a couple lh (1/8, 3/16, 1/4) drills.

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                    • #11
                      Sometimes a dab of valve grinding compound will give enough traction to get a screw out. Its surprising what a little spot of it will do for a phillips head screw.

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                      • #12
                        Ha, I have a set of bent, cut, and ground combination wrenches like that. LOL.

                        One I still have was used one time 38 years ago to snug down the mounting bolts on a carburetor for a 76 Ford Granada. LOL. Had to put just the right offset in the end to do the job.
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Every time I have to make a tool to do a job, it's a sure fire way of never having to do that job again. Kind of how I ended up buying all those lh taps. Needed to make an adjustable gauge at work a couple months ago and a small turn buckle would have been perfect. Trouble was nobody had a lh tap in the shop, and it wasn't worth ordering it so I came up with a different solution. I said the next time I need to order something I'm going to get a couple different sizes. They'll go in my box now, never to be seen again lol.

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                          • #14
                            I think this is really what torx bit sets were actually designed for :-)
                            Find the close one and it cuts its own splines when you bang it in, then the shape of the teeth avoids the torque escaping out the split.
                            Animal, but its pretty effective in the real world when nobody is looking.

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                            • #15
                              You could try some JB weld. Glue an allen wrench in place and let it sit for 24 hrs. Could be enough strength to hold the setscrew together so it won't expand as you're trying to remove it.
                              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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