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OT: Satellite server email access by another person question

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  • OT: Satellite server email access by another person question

    Friends had their child living with them. The child had a satellite internet service installed. The child then moved out and now has cable access. The parents continue paying for the satellite internet service but now want to get it put in their names. The child refuses. The parents have email at gmail, not at the satellite service and access it with either Opera or Thunderbird. The question is, can the child see or read his parents email since the email would come through the satellite server that the child could have access to from his new internet provider? They asked me what the reason could be for the child not wanting the service changed over? The only thing I thought of was to improve his credit rating because the parents faithfully pay every month. Or, some psychobabble control thing. Any other thoughts or ideas appreciated.

  • #2
    It's hard to believe that they didn't just ask him. But to give you an answer, I seriously doubt that having the sat service there is allowing the son to see the parents email data. Passwords are controlled at the email server end which are different than there son's.
    John Titor, when are you.

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    • #3
      The parents' use Gmail and have their Google password for access. The kid could read their mail only if he has their password. Which, from the sound of things, he might.

      They can continue safely with the satellite service, but - just in case - they should change their Google password.

      -js
      There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

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      • #4
        If the satellite isn't in their name they can just stop paying the bill and order their own service.

        Now there are things he can do having control of a remote internet access point. Spy camera, as a bounce for hacking, maybe other stuff. He may also be able to monitor web traffic, and possibly access their computers directly if he has set up some sort of remote terminal. If he is monitoring web traffic he could coordinate that with a key logger that reads the scan codes from the keyboard directly when somebody is typing. A keylogger may not even need to have remote access though. It could be set to do key stroke dumps periodically or whenever a secure connection is implemented.


        Sounds wonky. Been around this stuff to long I guess.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ridgerunner View Post
          The parents have email at gmail,
          if they're letting google read it, who cares if the kid does?

          In answer to you question, no. Their email is between them and google, nothing to do with the ISP. the only way us if they given the kid the google email password or he otherwise nefariously came up with it, but that would be true regardless of the internet provider
          .

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          • #6
            Great point. G Mail isn't exactly under your control. Google will not only read it, but they will save every message until the sun goes nova. Of course, I am sure that other e-mail providers do the same thing.



            Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
            if they're letting google read it, who cares if the kid does?

            In answer to you question, no. Their email is between them and google, nothing to do with the ISP. the only way us if they given the kid the google email password or he otherwise nefariously came up with it, but that would be true regardless of the internet provider
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ridgerunner View Post
              Friends had their child living with them. The child had a satellite internet service installed. The child then moved out and now has cable access. The parents continue paying for the satellite internet service but now want to get it put in their names. The child refuses. ...
              Tell the parents to contact the satellite company to inform them that the payee no longer resides at that address.

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              • #8
                Thanks all for sharing your knowledge and taking the time to respond. I wonder if the sat company keeps a log of access times that the son could access to see when his parents were going online? I'm pretty sure they have running data usage amount that can be monitored so people don't exceed their plan.


                Originally posted by RichR View Post
                Tell the parents to contact the satellite company to inform them that the payee no longer resides at that address
                Thanks Rich. They tried that but the sat company will only allow the person that opened the account make any changes.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ridgerunner View Post
                  ... Thanks Rich. They tried that but the sat company will only allow the person that opened the account make any changes.
                  If the satellite company won't accept a change of address to forward the bill to, tell the parents to stop paying it. The account is in the childs name,
                  isn't it?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RichR View Post
                    If the satellite company won't accept a change of address to forward the bill to, tell the parents to stop paying it. The account is in the childs name,
                    isn't it?
                    Ditto, Inform the billing department they are no longer going to pay. If the kid hacks that email then call the people like I did with Direct TV, put them on speaker phone and record the conversation. Then a phone call to your CC company to contest the next bill if it does not stop.
                    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

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                    • #11
                      The child refuses? Sounds like a case of PPP. My kid would not tell me that.
                      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                      Lewis Grizzard

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                      • #12
                        Since when does the child (age unspecified) tell the parents what to do ??? Especially when they are paying.

                        JL................

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                          Great point. G Mail isn't exactly under your control. Google will not only read it, but they will save every message until the sun goes nova. Of course, I am sure that other e-mail providers do the same thing.
                          Some companies do exist that not only don't access the data themselves, but encrypt the messages routinely. Three good providers I know of are ProtonMail, Hushmail and Reagan.com. They may not have all the conveniences of Gmail or Yahoo (the latter which I started with), but one can have two or more accounts and use the better one for important (e.g. business) mail.
                          Since Yahoo was bought by Verizon, combined with AOL and put under a new (OATH) corporation, its users have even fewer protections than before. Ever tried to call Yahoo and get a real person to talk to? I don't think it's possible.

                          Regarding the original question, if the child doesn't live there, doesn't own the property but won't cancel his access and the provider won't deal with the parents to close or transfer the account, it could be argued that a trespassing is occurring, making both entities liable for prosecution or at least civil lawsuits by the parents.
                          I also agree with the comments about refusing to pay the fees.

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                          • #14
                            The parents are retired so the son is probably in his 40's. I never met him. The parents said their son told them he tried to get it changed over but could not do it. After many more attempts asking him, he just says it can't be done and uses those words when discussing it so I used the word refused. As has been said here, I told them to quit paying for the service and notify the son. They did not want to get him a bad credit rating over this. I thought when I asked the original question if they knew the son was somehow accessing their information or email through his account ownership that information would then convince them act more forcefully.

                            CreakyOne, thanks for the information on the email providers. I knew about Hushmail but not the others. It is always nice to learn something new which these OT threads sometimes provide.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Unless the son has their email passwords or has remote access to their computer, it is unlikely he can read their emails.

                              If they are accessing their mail via a web browser, all the major providers use https to encrypt the data being transferred between the email server and their computer.
                              If they are accessing their mail via an application, such as Mail.app on MacOSX, depending on how the provider has configured their server, and how the application & account info was setup on the local computer, their mail may transferred either encrypted or unencrypted between their computer and the mail provider. Over the last few years, most email providers have been moving to requiring an encrypted connection for sending/receiving email. I know gmail has a bunch of pages on how to configure a bunch of applications to access their service properly and securely.

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