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  • #16
    Originally posted by aostling View Post
    My switch back to film was painless.

    I digitize the negatives with camera scans, using my Olympus E-M5 II, ...
    My other digital is an OM-D E-M5 (first gen, circa 2012).

    Do I understand correctly? You aren't just using the E-M5 II to convert negatives created BEFORE you went digital, you have resumed shooting on film - processing the results of new shots and then digitizing these, too ?

    If so, I am interested in any insights you care to extend regarding the decision to adopt that labour/storage/managerially-intensive process. Does it in part have to do with characteristics of photos taken by the film cameras which are difficult or impossible to achieve w/ modern digi counterparts?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
      ... But boy, they went out in a blaze of glory. Roger Penske and Mark Donohue campaigned Javalins in Trans-Am and later, Matadors in NASCAR. ...
      And don't forget one of the sleekest cars ever built, the AMC Pacer.
      Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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      • #18
        Ah yeas, the Rambler American. My first car was a 13 year old 1959 two tone blue Rambler American two door coupe. It had 3 on the tree and overdrive too! I was unable to find anyone who could tell me what overdrive was or how to use it.

        It was surprisingly roomy. It could accommodate 4 or 5 people in the back, 3 or 4 teens in the front. Two more would fit in the trunk.

        The inline six was simple enough that even I could disassemble it at 17 years of age. It was not so simple that I could get it back together.

        Not mine but the same faded blue color.
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

        Location: SF East Bay.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RichR View Post
          And don't forget one of the sleekest cars ever built, the AMC Pacer.
          And one of the least, the AMC Gremlin !

          When one looks back at the designs American Motors offered the public, it is clear they were really a daring organization.

          The fastback '65 Marlin. The Javalin and its short wheelbase sibling, the AMX. The Rebel Machine. The 1974 Matador Coupe.

          I test-drove a Hornet w/ a 360 4-spd. I forget whether AMC actually built them w/ the 401, or whether these were third-party conversions.

          Then there was the proto-typical SUV, way ahead of its time - the AMC Eagle sedans and wagons. Based on the Concord (which succeeded the Hornet), but fitted w/ all-wheel drive.
          Last edited by EddyCurr; 05-31-2018, 05:16 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
            Do I understand correctly? You aren't just using the E-M5 II to convert negatives created BEFORE you went digital, you have resumed shooting on film - processing the results of new shots and then digitizing these, too ?

            If so, I am interested in any insights you care to extend regarding the decision to adopt that labour/storage/managerially-intensive process. Does it in part have to do with characteristics of photos taken by the film cameras which are difficult or impossible to achieve w/ modern digi counterparts?
            My move back to shooting film started in 2015, after a visit to New Zealand. I stayed in a Wellington b&b owned by an ornithologist, whose hobby was film photography. He showed me his Moskva 5 (a copy of the Super Ikonta), and his Linhof 5x7 Technika. He also had a lathe which seemed too large to have been installed in his garage. I showed him a hundred-odd photos I'd taken when I lived in Wellington (1971-76), and he was enthusiastic about these. When I returned to Phoenix I finished digitizing all my NZ negatives, about 1000 images.

            Then I started digitizing a thousand images I'd taken in 1994-95, on a ten-month around-the-world backpacking trip. These were half color and half b&w, until a thief in Budapest managed to steal my Yashica T4 by slitting open my shoulder bag while I was standing in a subway car aisle. I still had my Pentax 928, so was not too inconvenienced.

            My incentive for this effort was a realization: documentary photos need to be on film. Even then, if they are not accompanied by a "contact sheet" showing what is on the negatives, they are likely to get chucked after I am gone. My New Zealand photos will be left to the Turnbull Library, which has expressed an interest.

            So my film photography is only for projects which should have semi-permanence. My current projects are Phoenix and San Francisco (which I visit twice a year).

            I am a keen birder; ditto for dragonflies. For this I use an M4/3 system, a Panasonic GX85 with Leica Vario-Elmar 100-400mm lens (200-800mm equivalent). Film no longer has much application, in nature photography.

            Age has slowed my travels, but I will continue to use digital for this.

            There are those who shoot film largely because of an appreciation for its rendering. This is my favorite forum for that: https://www.35mmc.com/about-35mmc/
            Last edited by aostling; 05-31-2018, 05:17 PM.
            Allan Ostling

            Phoenix, Arizona

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            • #21
              Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
              Did Cord make it beyond the e-50's?
              -Cord didn't even make it into the 40s. Their first car was something like 1929 to 1934, then the classic hidden-headlight version was from '36 to '37. That's pretty much it.

              I'm told that... I think it was Hupmobile bought some or all of the Cord body dies, to try and save big bucks on developing a new model, but of course Hup themselves closed in 1940 or so.

              Doc.
              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                Originally posted by EddyCurr
                Did Cord make it beyond the e-50's?
                -Cord didn't even make it into the 40s. Their first car was something like 1929 to 1934, then the classic hidden-headlight version was from '36 to '37. That's pretty much it.
                Omigosh. If you had raised a bet, you'd be pocketing the winnings.

                I remember being up close w/ a Cord in my youth and came across photos of the occasion earlier this year. I was so sure today that car was from the l-40's I didn't feel the usual need to verify before posting. Such a beautiful car.

                Thanks for setting me straight.

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                • #23
                  Am I right in thinking that Cord's were front wheel drive?

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                  • #24
                    aostling, thank you for the insights. That is a painstaking labour of love.

                    Originally posted by aostling View Post
                    My incentive for this effort was a realization: documentary photos need to be on film. Even then, if they are not accompanied by a "contact sheet" showing what is on the negatives, they are likely to get chucked after I am gone.
                    Perhaps you are familiar with the story "Finding Vivian Maier" about how a couple of chance encounters resulted in the preservation and dissemination of thousands of images found on negatives auctioned off from a storage unit ?

                    I lived & traveled in NZ a few years after your time there. Regretably, I have not been back, but I imagine it has changed. (Perhaps the goat trail of a 'road' up to the ski area in the Southern Alps near Wanaka has been domesticated?) I presume the Turnbull is in NZ.

                    The micro-four/thirds format is a winner in my opinion, especially for travel. There are several lenses I would like to have for my E-M5, but I make do with a 40-150mm (80-300) Tele-Zoom and a 60mm (120) Macro. I mentioned earlier the E-M5 is my 'other' digi - a 14 yo Oly C8080 is the favorite.

                    Thank you for the 35mmc link. I have an inherited vintage German Iloca Vario beside me that I will put film in some day to see what results. (Most of my own film images were recorded with Pentax 35mm cameras & lenses dating from a '60's era K1000.)
                    Last edited by EddyCurr; 05-31-2018, 07:12 PM.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by old mart View Post
                      Am I right in thinking that Cord's were front wheel drive?
                      Correct, that and its hide-away head lights are distinctive features. I thought they were supercharged, too. But a quick scan does not support this ...

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post

                        I lived & traveled in NZ a few years after your time there. Regretably, I have not been back, but I imagine it has changed. (Perhaps the goat trail of a 'road' up to the ski area in the Southern Alps near Wanaka has been domesticated?) I presume the Turnbull is in NZ.

                        The micro-four/thirds format is a winner in my opinion, especially for travel. There are several lenses I would like to have for my E-M5, but I make do with a 40-150mm (80-300) Tele-Zoom and a 60mm (120) Macro. I mentioned earlier the E-M5 is my 'other' digi - a 14 yo Oly C8080 is the favorite.

                        Thank you for the 35mmc link. I have an inherited vintage German Iloca Vario beside me that I will put film in some day to see what results. (Most of my own film images were recorded with Pentax 35mm cameras & lenses dating from a '60's era K1000.)
                        Eddy,

                        The Olympus 60mm macro is what I use for digitizing -- at 1:1 it allows you to actually crop a central area of a 24x36mm frame. I'm sure you know it is also excellent at infinity.

                        I got the best haircut of my life in Wanaka, in 1995. I was there last in 2010, and toured a newly-opened car museum. I don't know about the road to Treble Cone Ski Area, but John Hill (Artful Dodger) can fill us in.

                        When and where did you live, in New Zealand?
                        Allan Ostling

                        Phoenix, Arizona

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by aostling View Post
                          When and where did you live, in New Zealand?
                          '82. I arrived in Auckland w/ a Student Work Abroad visa and hitched, bused, ferried and even flew commercial to points north and south.

                          After leaving the nest in Auk (a B&B), accomodation varied. Hostels for the most part, occasional invites into private homes and then there was the night I d'mn near froze in the open cook area of a caravan park, with only a tarp to wrap myself. Transportation highlight of the trip: a lady driving an unconverted 70's Mustang who pulled over in the middle of nowhere along the east coast of the north island.

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                          • #28
                            I knew two people who had Nash/AMC Ramblers in high school. A 62 (or 63?) and 64 and both had these bench seats that went all the way back so that they were perfectly flush with the back seats - it converted all the seats into a big bed. I think the car was designed to be a sort of camper in its time. But as a hand-me-down old beater car for high school kids in the 80's, those seats were used for something else. The older Rambler had a push button shifter on the dash. The other one had a standard column mounted automatic. Both had 6 cylinders, can't remember displacement.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by aostling View Post
                              I don't know about the road to Treble Cone Ski Area, but John Hill (Artful Dodger) can fill us in.
                              I believe the road to Treble Cone is still a gravel track.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
                                I thought they were supercharged, too. But a quick scan does not support this ...
                                -They were indeed, using an oddball Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger, mounted horizontally (IE, spinning in the same plane as a typical distributor rotor) on top of the engine, driven off the camshaft by a bevel gear. Kind of a neat setup- the carburetor sits right on the center intake port of the supercharger, and there's two outlets, one at the front and one and the rear, that blow down into the intake:



                                I couldn't say for the first-gen Cords, but the latter two years, the hidden-headlight ones, all used the same engine (Lycoming 289 flathead V8) so I'm reasonably certain they were all supercharged.

                                Doc.
                                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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