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  • CreakyOne
    replied
    I remember seeing them, but was too young to remember the details of anything I wasn't around often. For example, I still remember the two rod-like protrusions with small lights which stuck out from the back of our 1950 Chevy.
    Anyway, I'd say this picture confirms your educated "guess":

    https://www.google.com/search?q=pict...1HCGZ8SjsSFnM:

    Leave a comment:


  • aostling
    replied
    Rambler Cross Country

    Please excuse this bump, which I expect will be brief. I spotted this car in a swank Phoenix neighborhood yesterday. A gated community, I followed a tradesman's truck after he had punched in the code. Most of the cars parked on the street were tradesmen.

    I was shooting film, Ilford 100 Delta, which is why you see it here in black & white. If I blow up the image I can barely make out the lettering on the back fender: it says Rambler Custom. Looking at internet photos, my guess is that this is a 1956 Rambler Custom Cross Country.

    Can you confirm this?




    Leave a comment:


  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Machine View Post
    I had two friends with late 80's LX 5.0L 'stangs. One was a hatchback with auto and the other was a sedan with manual shifter. Both were awesome with the stock FI motor. Sure it was a real hoot with a Cleveland. Although it must have been very cramped in the engine bay. The Cleveland and Windsor had higher deck height than the 302. Plus the Cleveland heads were massive compared to the small block heads. I'd be surprised they didn't have to cut into the shock towers or fab up custom headers to make it fit.
    It had custom headers and the firewall was modified to fit the bell housing and starter. They also couldn't fit an A/C condenser so the car didn't have A/C which was the one thing that really drove me to get rid of it but it wasn't hard to let go when I got my first Corvette (1990 L98) which wasn't as quick but handled like a go-kart compared to the Mustang, had A/C, removable roof, power leather lumbar seats, power everything, etc. and was an amazing car inside and out.
    Last edited by ; 06-02-2018, 05:43 PM.

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  • Machine
    replied
    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    I had the 351C in a 1989 Mustang LX.
    I had two friends with late 80's LX 5.0L 'stangs. One was a hatchback with auto and the other was a sedan with manual shifter. Both were awesome with the stock FI motor. Sure it was a real hoot with a Cleveland. Although it must have been very cramped in the engine bay. The Cleveland and Windsor had higher deck height than the 302. Plus the Cleveland heads were massive compared to the small block heads. I'd be surprised they didn't have to cut into the shock towers or fab up custom headers to make it fit.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Machine View Post
    I had a 351C in my old 1970 Torino. It had a top loader 4 speed and a Detroit locker rear with a 4:30 gearset. Torker intake with an 800 double pumper Holley, Crane fireball cam w solid lifters, dual point ignition, headers and dual exhaust. It would run consistent 13s with street tires. The Cleveland was an outstanding motor because it had a true 4 bolt main. Plus, its 4 barrel heads had MASSIVE intake valves: 2.19" in diameter. Compare that to the much touted double hump GM Corvette heads with their piddly 2.02" dia intake valves. NO COMPARISON. Although my Cleveland topped out at about 6500rpm (I had pushrods and a Fireball cam), that engine had the airflow and bottom end to easily go to 10K rpm if tuned correctly.
    I had the 351C in a 1989 Mustang LX. The previous owner built it so I don't know exactly what it had other than it obviously had a very steep cam and a Holly 750DP carb. It also had a custom electronic ignition system. I don't remember at all what RPM she topped out at but it was a really fun machine. I also had a stock factory 351C in a 1979 F150 pickup which I had before the Mustangs as one of my 1st vehicles. That was a great truck. She had cherry bomb glass packs for exhaust and a 6 inch lift kit and large cooper tires.

    Leave a comment:


  • Machine
    replied
    Originally posted by MrFluffy View Post
    My condolances. I was about to spring to the defence of the Renault gearbox as I'm a serious fan of (some of) their transaxles that they used during that period (and Delorean and Lotus thought so too, they both ran renault UN1 transaxles...) and I have a mid engined car project thus equipped with a buick/rover v8 in front of it, but I see it was cursed with the JB5-9's not the UN1. I think secretly Renault knew they were terrible at gearbox design during that period, so for the 369 (alpine) and Un1 (R25, 25 turbo, early espace etc) series, they bought in a design from a old 50's circuit track racer transmission and it turned out to be really strong. Even now a good un1 is a solid choice and there are various specialized manufacturers making stronger innards, although later audi boxes have turned out to be the current one to have for mid engined v8 builders. They even used a variant of it (the UN5) in their master range of panel vans, and anything that can survive a french delivery driver has to be tough. The later master went to a more conventional transmission and a transverse engine in place of the holdout longitudinal fwd layout and have a reputation for being made of chocolate however :-)
    Yeah I remember hearing from someone there was a Renault chassis with turbo motor and transaxle that was/is commonly used in road racing and it was/is very popular. The tranny in the Alliance had a very sloppy shifter and then one day it just got jammed for no discernible reason. The car was an utter turd with its 1.4L, so there was no point in banging gears in it and I never did. And I bought it from the original owner who was a mild mannered middle aged man. So it had low miles and was never abused. I never knew if that shifter issue was a common problem with them or not. I just knew I was done with that car by then.

    Another thing I remember is that the alternator went up at like 50K miles. It was some kind of French imported job and a replacement was nearly half the price I paid for the car. From what I recall it was around $250, which at that time was a king's ransom for me. And that was before the internet so you couldn't go online and find the best deal. All you could do is check with the few local brick and mortar automotive parts stores in your area and eat the exorbitant price - take it or leave it. Fortunately, I found a guy that rebuilt alternators a town over and he was able to rebuild it for about $100, which really saved me on that one.


    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    ...I had several Mustang 5.0s. One with a Cleveland 351 and all with the T5 5-speed. The C351 would twist the frame when you put your foot down and later got sub-frame connectors for the unibody to help stiffen it up.
    I had a 351C in my old 1970 Torino. It had a top loader 4 speed and a Detroit locker rear with a 4:30 gearset. Torker intake with an 800 double pumper Holley, Crane fireball cam w solid lifters, dual point ignition, headers and dual exhaust. It would run consistent 13s with street tires. The Cleveland was an outstanding motor because it had a true 4 bolt main. Plus, its 4 barrel heads had MASSIVE intake valves: 2.19" in diameter. Compare that to the much touted double hump GM Corvette heads with their piddly 2.02" dia intake valves. NO COMPARISON. Although my Cleveland topped out at about 6500rpm (I had pushrods and a Fireball cam), that engine had the airflow and bottom end to easily go to 10K rpm if tuned correctly.

    Only problem I had my Torino is that the tailshaft bearing in the 4 speed wore out. I delayed fixing it which was a mistake. But when you're a broke 19 year old, that's how it went back then. One day I was in the car with my girlfriend and I raced a souped up Camaro. His car was much nicer and faster than mine, but I kept at it up to about 100mph. The driveshaft was buzzing hard because of the tailshaft bearing being worn out. Suddenly a loud BANG! could be heard and felt inside. The exhaust was suddenly much louder too. The front UJ had given out and the driveshaft had departed the car. In my rear view mirror I could see a blurry image of it twirling around high up in the air behind me as we started our high speed coast. I reached for the brakes and the pedal went to the floor. The driveshaft had taken out the rear brake lines on its way out. I furiously pumped up the pedal hoping to bring the front brakes online well enough to stop the car. But they were largely ineffective, despite the separate reservoirs. So I used the parking brake, which fortunately still worked. It took a while, but I eventually was able to haul the car down finally drifting to a stop on the side of the road. My girlfriend was furious at me because I didn't stop when she had warned me at the start of the race. Although she didn't really understand just how close we came to being either severely injured or even killed with what could have happened had the driveshaft dug into the pavement. Without a doubt that was one of the most reckless and dangerous things I have ever done, especially considering I wasn't the only one being put at risk. I look back on it today ruefully and thank GOD nothing happened to her.

    And this will almost sound like a made up story, but I swear it is true. I ended up leaving the car on the side of the road overnight (in a fairly desolate rural area). The next day when I returned with a tow truck to pick it up, it was riddled with 18 bullet holes in it all along its length. Somebody had done a drive by on it and had unloaded one of those 22 cal tube fed rifles that holds exactly 18 rounds. Me and my friends always suspected it was shot by this guy that had a big grudge against the guy I bought the car from. And he didn't know he had sold it to someone else. But I could never prove it, so it was an issue that had always remained a mystery. And it made for an interesting story when I went to sell the car to some other guy, who I think thought I might be some kind of gangster.

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  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by MrFluffy View Post
    ..., they bought in a design from a old 50's circuit track racer transmission and it turned out to be really strong.
    Perhaps the Coletti?

    Edit: I also see these transaxles identified as Colotti. As this is the same sp as the name of the designer, it seems likely to be the correct one. Odd that histories of Lotus and of Ford's GT40s refer to Coletti, which is what I identify with.
    Last edited by EddyCurr; 06-02-2018, 02:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    The first brand new car I bought was my 1996 LT4 Bright aqua metallic w/6 speed. I loved that car. My previous car was a 1990 Red L98 w/6 speed that I bought used in '94. Previous to the vettes I had several Mustang 5.0s. One with a Cleveland 351 and all with the T5 5-speed. The C351 would twist the frame when you put your foot down and later got sub-frame connectors for the unibody to help stiffen it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrFluffy
    replied
    Originally posted by Machine View Post
    Well, long story short that Alliance was the biggest POS I ever owned. Although really, I didn't own it for very long. I eventually sold it to a local junkyard because the manual transmission got jammed in one gear. The shifter linkage was always very sloppy on it despite its low miles. Somehow the transmission had jammed in normal use and no matter what I tried, even after dropping the transmission from the car, I could not get the shifter unjammed. I pondered completely disassembling the transmission and attempting to unjam it and possibly replace whatever parts it needed. But by that time I was sick of the car, having had to make all types of repairs to it before that incident. So I took the loss and had a wrecker come get it. I foreswear any French cars ever again after that. And also never to trust what these automotive magazines say. They're either bribed, completely incompetent, or both. .
    My condolances. I was about to spring to the defence of the Renault gearbox as I'm a serious fan of (some of) their transaxles that they used during that period (and Delorean and Lotus thought so too, they both ran renault UN1 transaxles...) and I have a mid engined car project thus equipped with a buick/rover v8 in front of it, but I see it was cursed with the JB5-9's not the UN1. I think secretly Renault knew they were terrible at gearbox design during that period, so for the 369 (alpine) and Un1 (R25, 25 turbo, early espace etc) series, they bought in a design from a old 50's circuit track racer transmission and it turned out to be really strong. Even now a good un1 is a solid choice and there are various specialized manufacturers making stronger innards, although later audi boxes have turned out to be the current one to have for mid engined v8 builders. They even used a variant of it (the UN5) in their master range of panel vans, and anything that can survive a french delivery driver has to be tough. The later master went to a more conventional transmission and a transverse engine in place of the holdout longitudinal fwd layout and have a reputation for being made of chocolate however :-)
    Last edited by MrFluffy; 06-02-2018, 01:42 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ncjeeper
    replied
    This has been a fun thread to read being a gear head also. My 1972 Jeep CJ VIN tag says 'American Motors Corporation".

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Ahh. Judging by present images, the route is much improved.

    Found a little blurb on Dangerous Roads: Treble Cone Access Road

    Here's a YT video - It's a tame expressway, now.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VGxInlQp4gs
    Last edited by EddyCurr; 06-01-2018, 07:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
    Is it still predominently single lane w/ no easement, nor guardrail separating vehicles from the long steep barren slope, devoid of any obstacle to arrest your progress before you reach the valley floor?

    I imagine there are hundreds if not thousands of miles of such roads in NZ.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by Machine View Post
    Originally posted by EddyCurr
    [Though I do not KNOW, I'll venture that the 'Desert' setting was some marketing wizard's melodramatic adjective for what we refer to today as 'Recirculate'.
    Ok, I looked into the "Desert only" setting because thinking about it again piqued my curiosity. From wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weather_Eye

    "A feature was the "desert only" setting on the A/C thermostat control, a position that typically ran the compressor continually."
    Thank you.

    (Imitating Paul Harvey's voice) Now I know the rest of the story.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Richard 'Dick' Teague and his team did incredible work on a shoestring budget.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joel
    replied
    Lest anyone think AMC didn't make any beautiful cars, here is a picture of my 1970 Mark Donohue Javelin:



    I had forgotten about the 'desert only' setting, which IIRC was simply their way of marking the max air setting. The AC blew ice cold. The shifter said 'shift command' and the brake pedal 'brake command'.
    What a great car though - 400lbs of torque, ram air and an idle so smooth you could literally balance a quarter on end. 3:55 gears, limited slip and a short first gear made it a rocket off the line. 4 piston calipers on 11" rotors helped it stop. Really a fantastic all around car.

    Leave a comment:

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