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Questions about pin spanner wrench

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  • Questions about pin spanner wrench

    Picked up a used one today hoping it would be the right size to remove the chuck's lock nut (didn't have the Rockwell drill press handy). Are these wrenches made to standards (like a given capacity body diameter uses a specification-defined pin diameter)? Alternately, are they proprietary (aka anything goes)?

    The body diameter is ok but the pin diameter is too large. Examining the wrench's construction suggests that it is made as a body (looks like cast iron or cast steel) with the pin - obviously a different material - inserted into the former.

    I am wondering if the pin can be removed and replaced with another pin (body sized to fit the wrench body & the rest turned down to fit the nut)?
    Drill the body behind the pin and use a punch to drive it out? Is Loctite -or similar - to be expected in this situation? Or...?

    I expect that the pin is hardened steel. Is this essential for the replacement? Re-use of the makeshift pin version would be very infrequent; I would like to be able to reinstall the existing pin.

  • #2
    Yes, all the two-pin ones I have are a forged body with inserted pins. The ones with one pin that fir into radial holes on the periphery of a chuck, those usually have the pin forged with the handle, and finished to size.

    There are also pin spanners with two legs, that fit any spacing of pins, so long as the pin size is right.

    I see no reason you could not drive out an inserted pin and replace with one turned to whatever size you need. makes sense to me, if the spacing is right but the pins are wrong. They are probably hardened, and hardening to a blue temper makes sense, to strengthen them a bit and prevent them getting dinged up in use.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • #3
      I'd just grind the pins to fit. They make adjustable face spanners with replaceable pins. I have a set and they work great.

      metalmagpie

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      • #4
        screw them in, if the body is not too hard.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Dunc View Post
          Are these wrenches made to standards (like a given capacity body diameter uses a specification-defined pin diameter)? Alternately, are they proprietary (aka anything goes)?
          One standard in effect for "Hook Wrench w/ Pin" is DIN 1810, Form B. "Hook Wrench w/ Lug" is DIN 1810, Form A

          Older tools are likely designed to a more narrow regional or perhaps even proprietary configuration.

          Names of pin, hook and face spanner mfrs include

          JW Winnco

          Gedore

          Elora

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          • #6
            I have one that is very adjustable. It has a piece of hex rod for a beam and two aluminum holders for the pins. They can be adjusted to any spacing on the beam. They also accept a smaller sized hex rod and the pins are ground on the ends of those rods. I have at least three pairs of pins with different diameters and one pair of flat blades (like a straight screwdriver tip) for use in slotted rings. It would be easy to make additional tips with different diameter pins or other flat blades or perhaps some other type of tips.

            It was primarily designed for optical work and is somewhat on the light to medium duty side. But you are not going to put too much stress on a pin in a hole without breaking it anyway.

            So, adjustable ones are out there.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
              ......
              But you are not going to put too much stress on a pin in a hole without breaking it anyway.

              ....
              Do not be too sure. The pin is in single shear, and usually has virtually no bending, since it is held in the forged tool body, and is intended to fit closely in the hole, with the holder and "nut" closely in contact.

              With non-hardened steel at 7.6 tons/sq inch tensile for a normal loading (not ultimate strength), and so perhaps 4 tons shear, a 3/16" pin size would be good for 220 lb, and two of them for 440 lb. At a 1" radius, that is 440 in-lb or 37 ft-lb torque. Ultimate strength would be at least double that.

              Larger pins, or heat-treated pins, will be stronger. Heat treating may triple the strength.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #8
                I made this adjustable one a long time ago when I was restoring my KO Lee T&C grinder. I got tired of making individual wrenches for every different spanner nut I ran across.
                You can see the double sided flat one with the hole through it for the shaft.

                The only mistake I made on the adjustable one was the first set of pins I made I ground from a hardened dowel pin. The second time I used it I snapped a pin, way too hard for the size.
                The new pins you see in the picture were ground from a grade 8 bolt. .125 on one side and .140 on the other. Those were the only two size spanner nut holes on the different size nuts.
                Just haven't got around to pressing them in yet.

                JL................



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                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  With non-hardened steel at 7.6 tons/sq inch tensile for a normal loading (not ultimate strength), and so perhaps 4 tons shear, a 3/16" pin size would be good for 220 lb, and two of them for 440 lb.
                  The pins can't load share, so its only 220 lb for two pins.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lbender View Post
                    The pins can't load share, so its only 220 lb for two pins.
                    If you argued that there is a "couple" with the two, that might be an argument, but that would simply be some force that is not effective as torque.

                    However, in the usual usage geometry, the force applied would in fact total up as torque, and both pins would be effective. One would need to quantify any claims using the exact geometry and direction of forces to argue differently.

                    In any case, the available torque is at least double what I mentioned, since the assumed strength I gave is half or less of plain A36, and if hardened to a blue temper or so, they would still be considerably stronger than what I mentioned even if you assume that only one is effective.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #11
                      My tool box consists of 3 spanner wrench sets...one set is the hook style spanner and the other 2 kits have a small pin and a big pin 1/4" & 3/16" where the most common in my shop but I've also seen holders with a 1/8" & 5/32" pins
                      Dave

                      "I haven't failed,,,,,I have just found 10,000 ways that don't work" Thomas Edison

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