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Do screwdrivers come shaped like forks?

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  • #16
    That will work, but it is not the best way to make one. I pick up inexpensive sockets in those isle bins in the hardware stores. You know, the ones with the cheap tools that you would never use. Then I use the Dremel to modify them to produce two pins on the end of the socket. I only remove about 1/32" or so of the original socket. You can also use a file to do this; actually I finish it up with the file for nice square pins.

    A 1/4" socket, converted to a driver like this, will work well on a 1/4" square driver. And the socket is a lot stronger than those prongs on a regular screwdriver.

    I keep a bin of various cheap tools from these hardware store isle bins for conversion to lots of shop made tools. Wal-Mart also sells cheap tools that are fodder for these projects.



    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    Ya mean like this one ???

    I had to make this one to remove the screws on the bottom of a drip coffee maker.



    JL...............
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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    • #17
      Why destroy a screwdriver. A piece of silver steel/drill rod drilled for the clearance hole, then file end to leave the two 'blades' which only normally need to be about 20-30 thou so hardly any work. Chances are the next time you need that size rod it won't matter that it has a hole in the end anyway - no real loss of material except you might as well make an better shaped extended nut to replace the one removed.

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      • #18
        I'm not a golfer, but I think I once saw such an item made for golfers. It was just a flat piece of steel with a hole in one end the size of a golf ball for cleaning off mud (I think), and two flat prongs on the other end for tightening cleats on shoes.

        Such a thing might be adapted.
        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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        • #19
          I used one for many years, but I never golfed..

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Baz View Post
            Why destroy a screwdriver. A piece of silver steel/drill rod drilled for the clearance hole, then file end to leave the two 'blades' which only normally need to be about 20-30 thou so hardly any work. Chances are the next time you need that size rod it won't matter that it has a hole in the end anyway - no real loss of material except you might as well make an better shaped extended nut to replace the one removed.
            Because Craftsman are life time guarantee. I could always return it saying it was defective .......
            The dopes at the counter wouldn't know any better ! Ha, Ha......

            JL...............

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            • #21


              The trammel type camera lens wrench is not stiff against twisting.
              It is difficult to get the brass retaining rings of the 60+ year old lenses.

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              • #22
                Do you mean like on the top right of this set? Ive always known them as tamper resistant security screws, and I have a similar bit set that I use when manufacturers have thought I need protecting from myself when repairing things. Always worth having a cheap set around.

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                • #23
                  These are some from my 1/4" drive set, I have others that are bigger but I grabbed these because they were handy just to illustrate.
                  These are all name brand USA or Canadian tool brands Snap-On, New Britain, Cornwall, etc. Even threw in one to be used with 4 recesses for yucks.
                  Jobbers that carry quality automotive tools should be able to source whatever you need or you can certainly roll your own easily enough.


                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

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                  • #24
                    I spent an hour with the Dremel modifying a 1/4 drive socket to fit. Set it down to get something and it was gone when I came back. Searched everywhere, crawled on my belly under work benches. Gone.
                    Another hour on another socket. Got it finished and looked down to find the first one laying at my feet.

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                    • #25
                      1-800miner, welcome to the club!
                      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                      • #26
                        It knew it would be lonely, so it hid to get you to make a mate for it.

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                        • #27
                          Don't worry, it will turn up next year.

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                          • #28
                            Geez Willy , what are you working on ?

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                            • #29
                              Made these about 25 years ago. They were just for one job but worked so well they got to stay in the tool box. JR


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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by 754 View Post
                                Geez Willy , what are you working on ?
                                Mostly everything!
                                Some of these are old distributor tools, radio bezels, AC gland packing nuts, etc.
                                A lot of this stuff was handed down to me from when my Dad was an auto mechanic when we lived down in Calif. during the 50's and 60's.
                                Amazingly it comes into use now and then when I'm working on vehicles from that era. He left me with an awful lot of specialized tooling and knowledge from his days in automotive and marine propulsion service. Probably a big reason I'm a tool junkie.

                                He always taught me to seek out good tools as they would last a lifetime. His and mine by the looks of it.
                                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                                Location: British Columbia

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