Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Replacement Nozzles For Aerosol Spray Cans: That Was Easy

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Replacement Nozzles For Aerosol Spray Cans: That Was Easy

    Replacements for plugged/broken nozzles for aerosol spray cans are inexpensive and readily available at stores that stock professional/specialist art supplies.

    That won't be news for some here, but it was for me and the information might be useful for others.

    In addition, there is likely to be a selection of spray fan patterns to choose from and some nozzles will include a feature that enables you to rotate the orientation of the spray fan. For more information about specialty nozzles, one source to research is Montana Cans.

    I inadvertently broke the nozzle on a new can from Krylon when I couldn't figure out how to remove the new-to-me adult-proof cap.

    For decades, I've wasted the contents of cans and depleted the ozone layer by spraying upside down after painting something. Usually a futile gesture anyway, as the nozzles often needed help by cleaning before future use.

    I often saved nozzles from used-up cans, too, for just such an eventuality (clogged, broken, missing nozzle).

    Well, that is all history. At about $US 0.10 apiece for replacements for basic male nozzles, I'll never putz around with troublesome nozzles again.

  • #2
    Good to know - Thanks

    Be_Zero_Be
    Be_Zero_Be
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    You Never Used To Be Older

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't know what you buy that has the same nozzles but hardly any of mine do--At least across different paint brands. Even WD-40 cans have different nozzles for different sizes. And my purchases of different brands of brake cleaner shows different nozzles. However; I was able to use one of the brake cleaner nozzles with a tube on a can of ant and roach killer to dispatch a fire ant bed. The nozzle may look the same but the valve in the cans will vary in size, shape and release style. That's been my experience.

      Comment


      • #4
        I always pull mine after use, toss in lacquer thinner and blow though with compressor. I accumulate many more than I need as the cans empty.

        Comment


        • #5
          I always spray upside down AND THEN WIPE IT WITH A PAPER TOWEL OR RAG. I have cans that I have used a dozen times or more with no clogs. The real trick is wiping it, not the upside down spraying. For some modern paint formulations you don't have to spray upside down at all; in fact some cans have a flexible inside tube and will pick up paint in any position, even upside down.

          As for the environment, the gas in in the can and sooner or later it is going to come out; either by you or at the recycling center when they crush the can. So I see no net change in the amount of supposed harm to the environment from clearing the nozzles this way. The gas came from the environment and it goes back there where it can be used for next year's generation of spray cans. That's the very definition of RECYCLE.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
            I always pull mine after use, toss in lacquer thinner and blow though with compressor. I accumulate many more than I need as the cans empty.
            This pretty well sums up what I've always done.
            I always have a small hand pump sprayer in the shop filled with a petroleum based solvent that I use almost daily to give parts a final spritz and air blast before an assembly goes back together. Whenever I've used an aerosol paint, glue, etc can I grab my solvent spritzer and flush the nozzle before putting it back on the can. Sensitive paint product nozzles get the lacquer or acetone treatment after in order to prevent contamination.
            Although I do save the nozzles I must admit the collection has gotten much bigger than I can possibly foresee using since I very seldom have issues with them now.
            One does run across the odd bad one right from new but for such a small cheap mass produced product their quality level is very good and consistent.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

            Comment


            • #7
              Yes, I have had bad luck with nozzles from other brands of spray paint. Sometimes even one from the same brand but a different type of paint will not work. I wonder if those art stores just have nozzles for the brands they sell. Or is there some kind of universal nozzle?



              Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
              I don't know what you buy that has the same nozzles but hardly any of mine do--At least across different paint brands. Even WD-40 cans have different nozzles for different sizes. And my purchases of different brands of brake cleaner shows different nozzles. However; I was able to use one of the brake cleaner nozzles with a tube on a can of ant and roach killer to dispatch a fire ant bed. The nozzle may look the same but the valve in the cans will vary in size, shape and release style. That's been my experience.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                I always pull mine after use, toss in lacquer thinner and blow though with compressor. I accumulate many more than I need as the cans empty.
                Yup, same here. Works well for me. JR

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've got about 15+ cans of spray of various colors and uses. They've all been used and I quit removing the nozzles because that just allowed the liquid in the valve to harden. I just put the cap back on and set it on the shelf--Nozzle left alone. When I need a spray, I take the cap off and scratch the hardened flake/blob off the nozzle hole with my fingernail shake and spray. It's worked for me for the last 12 years or so. That procedure has worked for me even with the thick undercoating spray cans, spray adhesives and paint. Whether it was enamel, urethane or lacquer didn't seem to mater.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    also, you can use a standart valve stem to refil most of the cans. it works.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dian View Post
                      also, you can use a standart valve stem to refil most of the cans. it works.
                      Please explain how to refill a spray can with paint and propellant using a standard valve stem.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                        I always pull mine after use, toss in lacquer thinner and blow though with compressor. I accumulate many more than I need as the cans empty.
                        Yeah .. I do much the same, except I leave them all in a sealed jar of laq thinner. When I need to spray, just take out one that fits and maybe has the spray pattern I want and just use it. Anything in the nozzle is soft and blows out first. Only trouble is I wind up with too many nozzles :>))

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          take off the nozzle, connect valve stem to compessor, press the rubber end onto the can valve and fill the can. the internals of the stem are exactly as needed to open the valve. go and try it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Before WD40 changed nozzle design, I'd pull spray can nozzle off just-used spray paint can and substitute it for WD 40 nozzle, spray a little through and put both nozzles back on original cans. Nozzle stayed open. Guess any residual WD40 got blown out at start of next use, probably before spraying work piece. Never tried the lacquer thinner technique--thought it might dissolve nozzle--now I will try it. Also like the fingernail technique suggestion.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Nozzles are for wankers. Real men paint with explosives

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X