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Alignment of a Rotary Table on My Mill

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  • Alignment of a Rotary Table on My Mill

    I was on YouTube University earlier today watching a guy using a morse taper #2 with a center mark to align a rotary table. He didn't say what it was called.

    Can someone tell me the correct name for the alignment tool? I tried looking for a thing-a-ma-jig, but I couldnt find one........

    Thanks, Dennis

  • #2
    It was probably just a regular # 2 Morse taper and he used the center mark in the end to align the center of the RT to the center of the mills spindle. I don't think there's anything special for this.
    There are other methods especially if you have a chuck mounted on it, then you can't use the MT.

    JL.......
    Last edited by JoeLee; 06-11-2018, 12:14 AM.

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    • #3
      Different rotary table models have different features. Bigger ones often have a hole with a Morse taper in the middle. I have a smaller one (4 inch) with a threaded hole.

      BUT...


      Every one that I've seen has a round hole in the middle. Even the threaded one has a prominent countersink. Centering it can be as easy as putting a dead center in the spindle and lowering the tip into the hole while moving the table till it fits evenly. If the hole is recessed such that the dead center will not reach, try other things like a suitable countersink. If all else fails, cut down a dead center till it fits.
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #4
        Push the center with the quill into the centre holes lock quill.
        Now carefully tighten rotary table....it will be very close now.
        Zero your dials next..

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        • #5
          Any of the above methods will get you "close"--depending on what you're doing that may be all you need. Next
          step is to dial it in with an indicator...
          Keith
          __________________________
          Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
            Any of the above methods will get you "close"--depending on what you're doing that may be all you need. Next
            step is to dial it in with an indicator...
            Yeppers; that's what I do. I've made a tapered plug with a 1/2" hole that fits nicely in the taper of my RT. I also have a straight 1/2" rod that I slip into a collet and then I shuffle the RT around until the rod easily slides into the hole. So far that's been well within the tolerances of anything I have needed and if I need better, out will come my indicator.
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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            • #7
              I normally use a short alignment bar with a MT2 at one end, it also comes in handy for centring a three jaw chuck on the table top. Just do up the jaws on the bar and then tighten the fixings for the chuck. It will be within 0.002" of the centre, good enough for government work. Don't set the MT too tight, it has to come out before proceeding. For greater accuracy, as mentioned earlier, a dti is required, the lever type is much easier to use rather than the plunger type.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dlsinak View Post
                I was on YouTube University earlier today watching a guy using a morse taper #2 with a center mark to align a rotary table....
                What is a "center mark"?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by andywander View Post
                  What is a "center mark"?
                  The outboard 60° pointy end of a Dead Centre ?

                  The Blake CO-AX Indicator (& its clones) is an instrument that can be used when arguably greater set-up precision/speed/ease is required than the several good methods already mentioned generally provide.

                  New Blakes are pricey. It is a delicate instrument, so used ones can be problematic. I have never used a clone and only have hearsay on which to judge them.
                  Last edited by EddyCurr; 06-11-2018, 11:08 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dlsinak View Post
                    I was on YouTube University earlier today watching a guy using a morse taper #2 with a center mark to align a rotary table. He didn't say what it was called.

                    Can someone tell me the correct name for the alignment tool? I tried looking for a thing-a-ma-jig, but I couldnt find one........

                    Thanks, Dennis
                    Most will make size need for job
                    I use a dial indicated and small hammer when work with rotary table

                    Dave

                    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J320A using Tapatalk

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Depending on what you're doing a home shop made "bullnose" with a 1/2" shank to fit your collet in the spindle could be used to just push down into the center hole and align the table quickly to probably within a thou or two. Or if you have a chuck on the table grab a 1/2" pin in the chuck, center it if it's a four jaw then feed that pin up into a 1/2" collet, grip and tighten the table down. Again it should center things up within a couple of thou.

                      Outside of that there's lots of videos on YT on centering up a hole for further boring in a mill. Any of those should work.

                      Posting the link to the exact video you were watching would also help us to see what it is you're posting about.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
                        ...I have never used a clone and only have hearsay on which to judge them...
                        I bought an Asimeto clone a couple years ago and it seems to work just fine. The first few times I used I checked the
                        results with a DTI and they were within a few tenths--good enough for me...
                        Keith
                        __________________________
                        Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Might as well save some time and use the dial indicator because after you find the table center you are likely going to need to align a part on the table, using a dial indicator!

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                          • #14
                            Think I got this trick from John Stephenson to quickly centre a rotab under the spindle:
                            Insert a dead centre in the spindle and one in the RT. Bring the tips together till they almost touch and align them by eye. Now lightly clamp a 6-12” scale in the middle between the tips of the centres. Spin the scale to the X and then Y orientation and adjust till the scale looks horizontal in those positions. Table should now be centred within a few thousands.

                            I’ve checked myself and tends to be as good as the concentricity of the centres you use. My rotab takes an MT3 taper and can be hard to remove without access to the back when it is clamped down. So I made a little insert that is a close fit to the centre recess. Being closer to the surface of the rotab makes it easier to spot the scale being level to it too.

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                            • #15
                              If I need to be really picky with a rotary table setup I'll use an indicator, but for everything else, I just use a shop-made plug that fits the table's center hole pretty closely. The other end of the plug goes in an R8 collet in the mill spindle, and when I can lower the plug into the table hole, I know it's centered within a few thousandths. A chamfer on the bottom edge of the plug helps in locating the table.

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