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  • Hockey Pucks

    I have been using the Canadian standard sanding block for many years now. The hockey puck can be cut, ground, shaped, all sorts of things for many kinds of work. I am glad to an article that some body make a legitimate use of this sports object, the wonderful hockey puck!


    Jerry

  • #2
    This month's (September) Auto Restorer had an article about someone using hockey pucks as fog light bezels (trim rings). What will they think of next?

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    • #3
      I read where one guy uses hockey pucks as feet for machine leveling mounts. Jeff

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      • #4
        The machine feet guy would be me. Also use them as wheels, machine knobs (they're knurled- now you know why), and stamping dies, among other things.

        3" x 1", available anywhere, dirt cheap. Stock up today.

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        • #5
          When I was a kid, we played hockey on roller skates, no snow here in Kali.

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          • #6
            4 wheelers have used them for years as body lifts to clear the big tires. A hockey sock full will last for quite a spell!
            I have tools I don't even know I own...

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            • #7
              Around here lots of people use them as body mounts on pickups. Some even use them as body lifts. They work good as body mounts, but riding around on a 4" high stack of hockey pucks really never struck me as a brilliant idea.

              Brian_h

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              • #8
                Does anyone know what material they're typically made out of, and/or how strong they are? Must be pretty good if people are using them on trucks...

                -Matt

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                • #9
                  NHL Rule 24:

                  a) The puck shall be made of vulcanized rubber, or other approved material, one inch (1'') thick and three inches (3'') in diameter and shall weigh between five and one-half ounces (5آ½ oz.) and six ounces (6 oz.). All pucks used in competition must be approved by the Rules Committee.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    We use hockey pucks all the time.
                    Usually around late December or early Jan we(myself, son, and daughter) take a couple and go up to "The Bog"(just behind the new police station) .Bring along a few sticks and skates and play...
                    You guys should try it.
                    Nothing beats a good old game of "Pond Hockey"!!

                    [This message has been edited by motorworks (edited 09-01-2004).]
                    please visit my webpage:
                    http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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                    • #11
                      Dang, we don't have hocky pucks here in the desert! Wonder if buffalo chips would work?
                      Michael

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                      • #12
                        Ditto Michael!

                        "Pond Hockey" means something entirely different in these parts... and it ain't fun!

                        Besides, how do you keep from getting wet? Late December, Early January? The water around here is just get'n cool enough to drink.

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                        • #13
                          Hockey is very big in my school and I've had a couple of students that are hockey pucks and they don't work worth a damn in any application.

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