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21" Royersford Excelsior Restoration

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  • 21" Royersford Excelsior Restoration

    Hi all.

    I've started in on restoring one of these drill presses and thought I might document the process. You see a lot of these restored but not many documented. If you're interested, come along for the ride. I'm sure I'll have some questions as well.







    More pictures at the end of the video.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

  • #2
    Looks very compact and portable. Does it come with any accessories like a fork lift?

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome, great post. These restoration posts are my favorite, looking forward to seeing it progress. Jim

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      • #4
        Welcome to the forum! You should find some good information on Babbitt bearings here: https://play.google.com/store/books/...QAAMAAJ&rdot=1

        Tapered Babbitt bearings are discussed as an "alternative" means of wear compensation (compared to split bearings where shims would be removed). In the vertical orientation, the adjustment is automatic.

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        • #5
          tried to find info on Royersford. Are they out of Royersford, PA? That town is only a few miles from me.

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          • #6
            Royersford made the 21" drill press into the 1970's the later ones had had ball bearing on all the shafts. and they were still around 5 or so years ago. Ken

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            • #7
              Welcome,
              You are lucky to have found such a nice old machine. Am enjoying the video as I type.
              ' Tom

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Royldean View Post
                tried to find info on Royersford. Are they out of Royersford, PA? That town is only a few miles from me.
                Answering my own question. I actually used the google machine on the internet box and concluded that yes, they are indeed out of "Rofo", and have a foundry in Phoenixville, PA (a little farther down the road).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                  Looks very compact and portable. Does it come with any accessories like a fork lift?
                  Ha no, but do notice the backhoe in the background. It was very well needed for getting it off the truck.

                  Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                  Welcome to the forum! You should find some good information on Babbitt bearings here: https://play.google.com/store/books/...QAAMAAJ&rdot=1

                  Tapered Babbitt bearings are discussed as an "alternative" means of wear compensation (compared to split bearings where shims would be removed). In the vertical orientation, the adjustment is automatic.
                  Ah thank you. I'll definitely give that a look! This is the first time I've touched a machine with babbitts, so they are very new to me. I'm studying mechanical engineering right now, and seeing all these old mechanisms is just awesome. An automatic wear compensating bearing... I dunno that I would have ever come up with that. Much like the stuff I learn in class, I tuck things away in my "toolbox" so to speak, and I'm sure in the future the knowledge gained from fixing old machinery will come in handy designing new machinery.

                  The split babbitt bearings used wooden shims and were not tightened down. Should I look into replacing these with a metal shim stack, or just run them?

                  Originally posted by ken View Post
                  Royersford made the 21" drill press into the 1970's the later ones had had ball bearing on all the shafts. and they were still around 5 or so years ago. Ken
                  I knew they made them for a while, but I didn't know they lived that long. They switched to V belts as opposed the flat belts in the early 50s, so I assume this is before then.

                  Originally posted by wdtom44 View Post
                  Welcome,
                  You are lucky to have found such a nice old machine. Am enjoying the video as I type.
                  ' Tom
                  Thanks. I had part two uploading overnight, but something caused it to fail. I'm reuploading right now. Should be out tonight.
                  21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                  1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's a very nice restoration candidate you have. I have one that I went thru a few years ago and it was much more work. Mine came direct from military surplus and pretty sad off. It had broken handles, teeth missing on gears and the bracket that holds the table to the column was broken too.
                    Mike
                    Central Ohio, USA

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
                      That's a very nice restoration candidate you have. I have one that I went thru a few years ago and it was much more work. Mine came direct from military surplus and pretty sad off. It had broken handles, teeth missing on gears and the bracket that holds the table to the column was broken too.
                      That's a shame. At least you were able to do it proper. Any pictures of the restoration? I can see the table one, if you don't clamp the upper clamp it could be easily broken. We got some drills with ours and multiple of the drills had been removed with pipe wrenches, resulting in one having it's tang snapped off. It seems like people have no common sense sometimes.

                      --

                      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                      • #12
                        " It seems like people have no common sense sometimes."


                        I have determined that there are some people who should not be allowed to operate or be around machines. They can't "understand" them or "make friends" with them.

                        --

                        [/QUOTE]

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wdtom44 View Post
                          " It seems like people have no common sense sometimes."


                          I have determined that there are some people who should not be allowed to operate or be around machines. They can't "understand" them or "make friends" with them.

                          --
                          Some just have no decent sense of mechanical stuff.... the "if I push this, it will move like that" sort of thing.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                            That's a shame. At least you were able to do it proper. Any pictures of the restoration? I can see the table one, if you don't clamp the upper clamp it could be easily broken. We got some drills with ours and multiple of the drills had been removed with pipe wrenches, resulting in one having it's tang snapped off. It seems like people have no common sense sometimes.
                            I do have a few, I never got around to posting them here. Pretty sure they're over on the PM site. The power feed was a mess too.




                            Mike
                            Central Ohio, USA

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                            • #15
                              Two common things with these drills are missing or broken quill stop and a missing or broken elevation handle. Here's a photo I snapped of the proper handle on a drill that was for sale.

                              Mike
                              Central Ohio, USA

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