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  • Questions about Grizzly 7x12.

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    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-19-2004).]

  • #2
    The answer is well, yeah sort of.
    I think most import machines are going to need some cleaning up and sorting out to get them to perform with accuracy or reliability.
    I don't know what website you are referring to, but Varmint Al also has a website on these small lathes. Much information on setting up and accessories.
    A part of the hobby deals with making things to make things. Another part deals with making things. Both are rewarding and enjoyable. Take your pick, you will become involved in a little of each.
    Do I understand that you intend to buy both a micro lathe and a 7" x 12", or do you mean or?
    If it is or, definitely go for the 7" x 12".
    If it is both, I would recommend combining the budget, and looking for a good used Atlas or Southbend 9-12" lathe. Unless you are severely restricted for space, you will get much more machine for the money, and be able to accomplish anything you can do with the smaller lathes and much more. Your frustration level will be greatly reduced to boot.
    Jim H.

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    • #3
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      [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-08-2004).]

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      • #4
        Dan;
        I have not looked at all the copy. Some of the horsepower statements made by various manufacturers puzzle me also. I always related HP to amps as well, but now they make statements like "develops" 75 HP, or some such. I would stick to amps for comparison purposes. 1/3-1/2 HP is plenty for a lathe on this size anyway.
        You are going to get a lot of different opinions to any question posed here. Most have some validation to them, some are to be taken with a grain of salt.
        Grizzly is a reputable concern, as is Taig. Both machines are probably good, and manufacturers will stand behind them. I would prefer to deal with them than some company whose name sounds like something from column three on a Chinese menu or a new form of martial arts.
        Jim H.

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        • #5
          a group at yahoo.com is dedicated to the 7x10 and 7x12 lathes. They know all the pros and cons of these small lathes

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/7x10minilathe/messages/

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          • #6
            Dan,

            Figure that with any piece of equipment, new or used, there's always some cleaning, adjusting and setting up. That's pretty routine, I think.

            Your observation about flaws and such out of the box is typical of some Asian pieces of equipment. Some brands are better than others, as QC tends to vary. With a brand like Taig, Sherline, South Bend or Atlas, you probably won't need to correct anything right off the bat. Grizzly seems to be among the better imported brands. I've always been very impressed with the quality of their products.

            Upgrades happen when the need arises, like going from a rocker toolpost to a quick-change. I started with, and still have, a 10x24 Atlas that I'm very happy with. It hasn't been a project in itself. My guess is you'd be very pleased with a Taig, Sherline or Grizzly 7x12. Other than the normal setting up, you'd probably be able to get to work right away.

            Operator skill in large part determines the quality of finished work, but it's a whole lot easier to do good work with good equipment. Makes it easier to climb the learning curve, methinks. Hope this is useful information.

            Tom

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            • #7
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              [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-08-2004).]

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