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1980's MSC Milling Machine Help

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  • 1980's MSC Milling Machine Help

    I tried posting this in Third Hand with no luck. Try it here.

    I just recently came into a used MSC 1980ish milling machine, it appears to be a clone of a Jet JVM-840. I have been taking it apart to clean and I am attempting to get it working. However, I believe it is missing a couple of pieces. I am hoping someone here can help me identify these pieces and give me ideas on how to replace or build them. The fine feed assembly for the spindle is missing a face gear/clutch as best I can tell. I have a cylinder cut to fit in there but I don't have the knowledge or ability to cut the teeth. I do have the engagement knob and cover that go on the outside. Please see pics. If anyone has pictures of these pieces or knows where I could buy or have built a replacement part please help. Also if you have any experience with a mill like this I would like to hear.





  • #2
    Amazon has a service manual for $19 on the Jet. I couldn't find a manual for the 840 on Jets site.

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    • #3
      Mine uses a similar mechanism. The knob presses down on a metal sleave (transmission sleave per their manual) that rides on the keyed shaft. The sleave has a recess for the spring that pushes it out of engagement when the knob is backed off.


      The sleave is NOT a precision device. It does mesh with the teeth that are visible in your pictures, but it's full mesh when pushed in and not touching when backed out.

      Note that the "teeth" on the sleave are simple triangles. You could, conceivably, file a few teeth and then grind/mill/file the rest of the material away.

      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #4
        It's a type of hurth coupling, probably with a spring that disengages the drive when the fine feed is not required and the drilling handle is used. The museum's drill-mill is not so clever, and just relies on the friction of a cone joint.
        With a full set of teeth on the worm wheel, you could cheat a bit and get away with, say, three sets of two teeth, evenly spaced.

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        • #5
          Thanks everyone for the help. Here is what i have made so far, it isn't pretty but it locks in. I just need to cut the key way now. Thanks so much for the picture and advise.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mccraryfirearms View Post
            Thanks everyone for the help. Here is what i have made so far, it isn't pretty but it locks in. I just need to cut the key way now. Thanks so much for the picture and advise.
            Glad to have been of help. You picked the easiest part to remove from the mill, so the pictures were the hard part! LOL


            Dan
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

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