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My first lathe: What are some good accessories?

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  • My first lathe: What are some good accessories?

    .

    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-19-2004).]

  • #2
    1. Quick change tool post
    2. Live centers, lathe dogs
    3. Knurling tool
    3. Parting tool

    Albert

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    • #3
      a milling machine, drill press, grinders, welding equip, and a big pile of money. Sorry about my humor .... I tend to tell the truth every once in a while.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey! Home shop machining is still cheaper than golf. And sometimes you even get something out of it, besides more shop tools.

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        • #5
          Don't forget the BBQ and fridge for "operator coolant". That is real important.

          Dan

          If you can afford to get only one chuck get a four jaw. Other goodies you will need is a dial indicator set (starret last word are the best), A dial caliper at least 6", and a 0-1" micrometer is handy. A ruler and safety glasses - a wrap around face sheild is better - especially when cutting brass. A center punch and some drills are usually needed.

          Be safe, read and understand your machine manual and what the various controls do - take your time and have fun.

          Dave



          [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 06-03-2002).]

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          • #6
            Add a tailstock drill chuck, and bench grinder for sharpening drill bits. The Southbend "How To Run a Lathe" book and a good, solid tool post are also highly recommended.
            Jim H.

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            • #7
              Trap,
              You got that right.
              As a long term plan, plan on at least one of each.
              It'll keep you out of the bars and be lots cheaper in the long run.
              You really only rent all that booze.
              mite

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              • #8
                See next posting....

                [This message has been edited by SGW (edited 06-03-2002).]
                ----------
                Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you can get only one, get a 4-jaw chuck.
                  A couple of centers. Bison brand centers are good, and not too expensive. Personally, I've never felt the need for a live center.
                  A tailstock drill chuck.
                  Dial indicator and magnetic base.
                  Faceplate and lathe dogs.
                  A set of collets is really nice. Don't think you need to get 'em by 64ths; 1/16" to 1/2" by 16ths, 5/8", 3/4", 1" (or however large you can go) will handle nearly everything. If you find you need a size other than those, you can always get it.
                  A steady rest is occasionally useful, as is a follower rest, but you probably won't need them much.

                  See if you can find a copy of "The Amateur's Lathe" by L.H. Sparey. It will tell you a lot. It's British and may be a bit hard to find, but TEE Publishing in England may have it. In fact, since you haven't gotten the lathe yet, see if you can get this book first and read it before you get a lathe.
                  ----------
                  Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                  Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                  Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                  There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                  Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                  Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dan, if this is your first lathe, maybe you are a beginner? If so, I have some problems with the 4 jaw chuck advice. This seems a bit tough on a beginner, 4 jaws are great (and essential), but not easy to use first off. My call would be a 3 jaw for getting started, and for most common use, and definitely get both if at all possible. A 4 jaw alone could take all the fun out it!
                    Live centre (revolving tailstock centre)essential too! Dead centres are another disaster for beginners.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Get the four Jaw and spend a little quiet time learning how to dial in parts. My goal for my students is "within .001 in 2 minutes" most can do it. I always use a live center--no reason just do. The next important tool is a text that will help you sharpen your tools correctly and a good small grinder to do just that. I also use diamond stones and oil stones for the final finish. A dial indicator is nice- A Starrett 196 will do most of what you want. If you want a little more accuracy go to a Starrett "Last Word". Time is the most important accessory---I treat myself to 6-9AM both Saturday and Sunday---The rest of the neighborhood is still sleeping and so is my ball and chain. Hot coffee, good music and my machine shop, it don't get better than that with your clothes on.

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                      • #12
                        This may not be strictly relevant to the question of what accessories to buy, but I can confirm that setting up work in a 4 jaw chuck is not all that difficult, even for a beginner.

                        The first time I used mine, it wasn't even for a cylindrical part, I was centering a punch mark on the face of a rectangular block. First I had to make a centering rod first, a piece of 1/4" round stock about 8" long with a center drilled hole in one end and a 60 degree point on the other end to ride in the punch mark.

                        Then I used a dead center in the tailstock to get the workpiece close to center. (I moved the tailstock between the headstock and the carriage to reduce the extension on the tailstock spindle. That was tedious, and I haven't bother on subsequent jobs.) Then I put the point of the centering rod in the punch mark, put the center hole on the dead center in the tailstock, snugged it up just tight enough to eliminate any perceptible side play, and set up an indicator riding on the centering rod as close to the work as I could get it.

                        I don't remember where I had read about the technique, probably in Lautard's TMBR. First I centered the work between jaws 1 and 3, slacking one and tightening the other to move it the way I wanted it to go. The slacking and tightening took some concentration because the jaw bolts on my chuck have left hand threads. It took a little backing and forthing, but I eventually got it to where the indicator showed the same reading over both jaws.

                        Then I did the same thing with jaws 2 and 4. That went faster, both because I had started pretty close and there wasn't much runout left by then, and because I had gotten used to the left hand threads and didn't have to think quite as hard to move the jaws in the right direction. I can't remember now if I had to go back and tweak 1 and 3 on that first attempt. Sometimes I do have to, sometimes I don't.

                        I think it took more than two minutes, but it was very much a matter of just being slow rather than difficult or frustrating. In fact, I remember being amazed at how simple it was, because I had read about people having difficulty.

                        This technique depends on the work being able to slide between jaws 2 and 4 while you adjust 1 and 3, and vice versa, which means that for some stock shapes, you have to be pretty close to center before you start. But with the dead center in the tailstock and some kind mark (not necessarily a punch mark) on the face, that's not difficult. It also helps to put some cardstock between the work and the jaws. I usually use strips cut from those heavy, green, hanging file folders.

                        As a parenthetical note, I've since run into a situation where I needed a cat face chuck because the sides of the work weren't square to the face. I haven't gotten around to building it yet, but when I do, I don't anticipate any difficulty centering the work in it, because it's the same principle as the 4 jaw chuck, just with two sets of jaws front to back.

                        [This message has been edited by Uncle Dunc (edited 06-03-2002).]

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                        • #13
                          .

                          [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-19-2004).]

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                          • #14
                            In looking thru many of the suggested accessories I find that there is an important lack of emphasis on a very important one. 'Sidestep' did note a 'good small grinder' for sharpening tools. I suggest that a grinder is the most significant accessory you will need, aside from many of the items mentioned that are likely to be included with a new lathe from Grizzly. And I think that you should not go too small on the grinder, either. You will not only be sharpening toolbits, but grinding them from new blanks (which you should also buy . . . HHS, and be sure they aren't too large for your toolpost) and a small grinder might not be able to handlle those chores very well. Size here refers to the HP of the grinder's motor, not the diameter of the grinding wheel(s). Anything less than 1/2 HP might be quite frustrating in the long run.

                            Good luck!



                            ------------------
                            Rich Kuzmack

                            Pi = 355/113 . . . to
                            <85 parts per billion

                            [This message has been edited by Indexer (edited 06-03-2002).]
                            Rich Kuzmack

                            Pi = 355/113 . . . to less
                            than 85 parts per billion!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Good point on tool sharpening. You need to be able to do it. Get yourself one of those cheap ($15?) swing-arm protractors so you can measure the angles and get them correct; the angles matter, both for proper cutting and for tool edge longevity.
                              ----------
                              Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                              Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                              Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                              There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                              Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                              Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                              Comment

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