Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

More LED shop lights

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • More LED shop lights

    Anyone using these:
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-...2910/303040479

    About a year and half ago I purchased a 10 pack of Phillips T8 led replacement bulbs for my shop. I have 4 4 tube fixtures in my shop. About a month ago I discovered one tube was not lit. Took it back to Home Depot, naturally I did not save my receipt, but they took my word and replaced it. So two days, it was pretty dark on one side of shop, and looked up to discover 5 more tubes not lit. Thankfully they have a 5 year warranty.
    Anybody else experiencing this mass failure???
    Gary Davison
    Tarkio, Mo.

  • #2
    I am not at all surprised and I expect massive LED light failures in the coming years... and countless threads on same.

    A lot of us are buying into LED shop lighting, for obvious reasons. We're told LEDs last a Really Long Time. But most everyone is ignoring that the imported electronics probably have a short life. Many purchase decisions are made based mainly on availability, cost and lumens. We don't have info on reliability or longevity.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm using the direct wire version of that light, as the ballasts in my older fixtures didn't work with the "instant fit" version. No issues yet, plan to convert more fixtures when I get time.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've had 4 in the kitchen for a year, no problems.

        Comment


        • #5
          Several days in the last month my computer has been shutting down due to a 'thermal event'. On the cooler days it's no problem, but with indoor temps being around 80F + it's been happening. I have since had it apart and removed the heatsink on the cpu, full clean, fresh thermal compound, put back together. No problem since- but the point is that especially with high ambient temperatures, electronic items can overheat. Leds are electronic parts, and they generate heat which must be removed to keep the part temperature within reason.

          Most available led lights don't have enough heat-sinking ability, and short life is going to be the result. There's a reason why they suggest 'not for use in enclosed fixtures'. I just bought an led strip light- basically just a long, narrow pc board slid into an aluminum extrusion with a plastic cover also slipped into it. There's no direct contact between the back of the pc board strip and the aluminum, so no direct path for the heat from the leds into the aluminum. With most of the screw-in led bulbs the led array in on an aluminum disc, and the heat is taken out only at the outermost edge of it- and into an aluminum cone which is plastic coated. Certainly not a lot of surface area to spread the heat to the surrounding air. Some of that heat will get conducted to the screw base, but from there it's all pretty much insulated anyway so there's little means of conducting heat away.

          The led fluorescent replacements are little different. What I usually see is a 'tape' of leds with adhesive backing stuck to the inside of the sheet steel fixture. This is functional, but still a long ways from optimal as far as heat dissipation. The last one like this that I installed has some gaps between the steel fixture and the led strips, in other words the strip is not stuck down well over its full length. Some of the strips that I've used personally are warped enough in spots that it can't be in full contact all the way. I've actually cut out some of the bad spots to get strips of the length I wanted that can be in full contact. It's a bit of a waste, though they don't cost that much in 5 meter lengths to begin with.

          I may be guilty of over-kill as far as providing heat-sinking, but I don't really think so. I've never had any light I've built from scratch fail on me. There's little you can do with a store-bought light, except to perhaps choose your led lights partially based on how well they have catered to heat removal.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

          Comment


          • #6
            I had bought a bunch of Sylvania 60w bulbs only to discover later on that in tiny print on the bulb it said "not for enclosed fixtures". Didn't say it anywhere on the packaging. No problem with Costco shop lites however. I have a couple that I've been using as jobsite work lights, banging them around quite a bit. No problems. Don't heat the place up like halogens.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Glug View Post
              I am not at all surprised and I expect massive LED light failures in the coming years... and countless threads on same.
              I agree. The fluorescent bulbs were supposed to last for many thousands of hours....not in my home.
              I guess the potential is there if the bulbs, be it fluorescent or LED aren't made like crap in china.

              Comment


              • #8
                I purchased 40 four foot LED tubes about a year ago and installed them in my house and shop. Yes, I have a lot of fluorescent fixtures. The bulbs that I bought can be used either directly connected to 115VAC or with ballasts. In these various fixtures, 17 of them, I had ballasts that ranged from almost new to over 30 years old. I did not want problems due to bad ballasts and I did not want to have to replace ballasts or rewire the fixtures later. The bulbs were also more efficient when wired directly, with no ballast. So doing away with the ballasts at the start seemed like the best route. I say this because if you are running your LED tubes with ballasts, that may be part of the problem.

                39 of the bulbs were installed and I have one spare. I haven't had a single problem since then. Not even a flicker. So far, so good.

                They were a import brand, probably Chinese. The name on them is Sunco. They weren't cheap. I have seen better prices since then in the local home supply stores, but I do not regret the purchase. And the internet/Amazon price has also come down since then.

                https://www.amazon.com/Sunco-Lightin.../dp/B0163D7CP8
                Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 07-31-2018, 06:00 AM.
                Paul A.

                Make it fit.
                You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                Comment


                • #9
                  IN this day and age, I suspect that all of them are made in China or some other Pacific rim country.

                  The tiny, flea power LEDs WILL last for decades. But when they have to go to power levels that will light up a room and have to add electronics to accomplish that with the AC power line Voltage, then things get more complicated. They are in the shakeout phase of this product. They can make them, but not all the designs have the long life that you would want. Some of the companies are more honest about this than others. And as time goes by, the better designs will float to the top and the bad ones will sink out of sight. This is one of the reasons why I do not like to be on the cutting edge of new technologies.



                  Originally posted by polaraligned View Post
                  I agree. The fluorescent bulbs were supposed to last for many thousands of hours....not in my home.
                  I guess the potential is there if the bulbs, be it fluorescent or LED aren't made like crap in china.
                  Paul A.

                  Make it fit.
                  You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I just switched one of my lights int he shop to led because of a bad ballast. I ended up getting some menards lights but was disappointed to see they are not clear (made to look like an original florescent light). But they work and light up the shop in that corner again.

                    I was going to order a 10 pack off ebay of the clear one at some point. But I too worry about them failing much like the OP is experiencing.
                    Andy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A nearby university re-lamped their fluorescent fixtures with LED tubes that supposedly would work without removing the ballasts. After a few fires started it became obvious the only safe thing to do would be to remove the ballasts, as should have been done in the first place.
                      So many projects. So little time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I replaced all of the ~60W BR30 incandescent recessed lights in my home with equivalent ~7W LEDs about 3 years ago and haven't had a single failure yet with around 80 of them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                          I replaced all of the ~60W BR30 incandescent recessed lights in my home with equivalent ~7W LEDs about 3 years ago and haven't had a single failure yet with around 80 of them.
                          Speaking of LED BR30's, I recently bought 3 of them at my local 99 Cent and More store for a buck apiece. Went back for more and found they had 2-packs of BR40's (full size reflector floods). Yes, they were a buck. I bought all they had. Going back today.
                          It's all mind over matter.
                          If you don't mind, it don't matter.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post
                            Speaking of LED BR30's, I recently bought 3 of them at my local 99 Cent and More store for a buck apiece. Went back for more and found they had 2-packs of BR40's (full size reflector floods). Yes, they were a buck. I bought all they had. Going back today.
                            I bought mine from Lowes. I forget the brand but it I think it was G.E. or Philips and we have digital dimmers all over the house place so I wanted to get dimable BR30's and I think they were on sale at the time for something like ~$5 each as it cost me around $400 to replace them all which was very cheap as I think they were normally like $15 or $20 each. EDIT: Just looked at one and it's a Sylvania 65W equivalent dimable and they are all 11W not 7W. Not sure why I thought they were 7W.
                            Last edited by 3 Phase Lightbulb; 07-31-2018, 12:28 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It depends who you buy.

                              I had so many violent failures (smoke, sparks and burning particles shooting out) with CFLs made by/for "Feit Electric" that I refuse to buy their LEDs either. They made the Home Depot house brand, and I refuse to buy those also. Most "house brands" are made by the cheapest vendor that purchasing can find. Not a prescription for good performance.

                              I have generally found that any product made by CREE is a good one, does what it says, works well. I have not had any failures yet, so I do not know what the failure modes are. I know a bit about the innards, because they are buying the chips for their power supplies from "Power Integrations", which has a large number of good chips for the lighting and general power supply market. I have used them in a number of products, with excellent results, so I trust the source.

                              I think some of the other folks must be getting their electronics from "Happy Sparks Electronics LTD" somewhere in china.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X