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  • Tool Post Drill Chuck

    Does anybody have experience using a tool post mounted chuck for drilling holes on the lathe? Something like this:
    https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...ory=1005208204

    With a drill chuck inserted of course. Id like a way to make drilling deeper holes slightly more tolerable, tailstock only has 1.5 inches of travel and sweet jimney christmas that crank it a bloody pain after a bit. So, any first-hand experience floating around out there? How easy is alignment to start drilling? Vertical seems dead simple, set that once and never change it. Angle seems just as easy, dial indicator and some drill rod to dial it parallel with the ways. In and out seems a little fuzzier to me, but even then moving the carriage until the drill tracks on center seems pretty quick and easy.

    So, am i missing something here, or is it as nice as my mind wants to make it? I really just want a way to clear chips out of those 2.5" deep holes that doesnt involve five thousand cranks on that handwheel, digging up a wrench, unlocking the tailstock, yanking the tailstock back without bumping it off the bed ways, cleaing and lubing the drill, then repeating the entire process in reverse. Plus, cant say the idea of running a reamer in that process fills me with hope...

    Cheers!

  • #2
    Nope. I haven't drilled with the tool post, but I have a turret tool I had planned to setup for a job that never materialized. Let us know how it works out.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #3
      You can use a regular quick change toolholder with a straight shank chuck in it. They have dedicated ones that are very expensive. https://www.ebay.com/itm/ALORIS-BXA-...IAAOSwuhFaHz3P
      Kansas City area

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
        You can use a regular quick change toolholder with a straight shank chuck in it. They have dedicated ones that are very expensive. https://www.ebay.com/itm/ALORIS-BXA-...IAAOSwuhFaHz3P
        Yeah, its a little expensive, but I LIKE THAT. I'll have to add it to my list of retirement projects to make one. LOL. Be pretty easy with a threaded chuck with an internal retaining bolt. Just take an afternoon to do it.


        Reality check of course... I have a couple straight shank chucks, and atleast two or three lathe tool holders with the groove in the bottom for a boring bar. LOL.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
          Reality check of course... I have a couple straight shank chucks, and atleast two or three lathe tool holders with the groove in the bottom for a boring bar. LOL.
          Not gonna lie, i thought about just grabbing a chuck with a 1/2" straight shank and throwing it in my boring bar holder. Actually the more expensive option, given that a halfway decent chuck setup would cost more than the mt2 holder and using my tailstock tooling.

          Im somewhat encouraged by the fact that nobody has immediately said "thats a stupid idea dont do it" or "tried it once, didnt work worth a darn". Seems like a good sign, i think.

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          • #6
            I have both a straight shank drill chuck held in a boring bar holder and a drill driven drill chuck in a holder that I use for cross drilling. I use both alot - my lathe also has a miserable amount of tail stock quill travel. I haven't found it hard to get the horizontal alignment right - make sure the end of the piece is faced flat without a pip, eyeball it and then look at the tip of the drill. You can see if it's off center very quickly as the tip will oscilate. Or you can start the hole with the tail stock and line it up that way. Or you can center drill the piece and stick a rod with a 60deg cone in the drill chuck and line it up using the center.

            Makes deep hole drilling a dream. I also use the 3/8" shank drill chuck on my mill too, saves changing the collet or collet chuck.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
              Not gonna lie, i thought about just grabbing a chuck with a 1/2" straight shank and throwing it in my boring bar holder. Actually the more expensive option, given that a halfway decent chuck setup would cost more than the mt2 holder and using my tailstock tooling.

              Im somewhat encouraged by the fact that nobody has immediately said "thats a stupid idea dont do it" or "tried it once, didnt work worth a darn". Seems like a good sign, i think.
              It works really good for smallish drills. For large drills the feeding force can get unpleasantly high with small lathe.

              I just clamp shafted chuck to qctp and eyeball it straigt with long rod.
              For looong drills er-chuck is even better because you can adjust the drill lenght.
              Best I have done was 200mm deep 4mm hole in stainless ..

              [IMG][/IMG]
              Last edited by MattiJ; 08-31-2018, 01:07 AM.

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              • #8
                On my lathe the carriage can tow the tailstock. Quite handy for drilling large diameter holes.
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                  It works really good for smallish drills. For large drills the feeding force can get unpleasantly high with small lathe.

                  I just clamp shafted chuck to qctp and eyeball it straigt with long rod.
                  For looong drills er-chuck is even better because you can adjust the drill lenght.
                  Best I have done was 200mm deep 4mm hole in stainless ..

                  [IMG][/IMG]
                  How big is 'big'? I figured that larger bits run the risk of twisting the tool post, but there the question is still where the 'larger' line lies. For my purposes i doubt hole size would ever be above 3/8" for most things, with the occasional larger being step drilled. Immediate use tasks are 7/32" pre-ream drilling and reaming, which im hoping is well inside the size limits. Lathe managed it fine when feeding with the tailstock, so i cant imagine the tool post presting over much of a problem.

                  Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                  On my lathe the carriage can tow the tailstock. Quite handy for drilling large diameter holes.
                  Ive seen people doing that, looks like a pretty nifty trick. Never work on mine though, theres no way to lock the tailpost to the bed enough to stay stable but not enough to lock movement.

                  Ill confess, i actually pulled the trigger on the tool holder a bit after posting this. Was ordering tooling for a project anyway, figured why not, you know? Seems like a reasonable solution to my problem and i didnt get anybody immediately decrying it as a bad idea which i figure is a very good sign. Should be a nicer way of drilling those deeper holes than the tailstock, plus i get to bypass the fact that my tailstock is .010" higher than center on my lathe... Need to fix that one of these days. Should have the new stuff in hand before long, ill get back with results!

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                  • #10
                    There is one guy that uses a qctp holder to drive a chamber reamer in a barrel. I never did talk to him about it, seems it would be difficult to align everything. Height, fore and aft then getting the qctp in line. That's why most use the tailstock. But this guy does good work!

                    Now for drilling holes, and not cranking, I'm liking the idea.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
                      How big is 'big'? I figured that larger bits run the risk of twisting the tool post, but there the question is still where the 'larger' line lies.
                      Depends on your lathe size, 9x20 harbor freight or 18x60 Krasnoyarsk brute...

                      On my 11x24 kerry anything over 10mm gets kind of heavy on the hand wheel, forces on the tool post are still quite small at this level and not really limiting factor. YMMV, on some other lathe hand wheel could be geared totally different.
                      With pilot hole to reduce thrust I'd say anything up to 20mm would work on mine.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                        On my lathe the carriage can tow the tailstock. Quite handy for drilling large diameter holes.
                        Like to see a picture of that set up.

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                        • #13
                          Maybe the next two upgrades need to be: lever action tailstock feed; fitment of tailstock to bed improvement and quick release tailstock lock.
                          Both would make drilling easier.

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                          • #14
                            I took a course on CNC machining a while back at the local community college. I noticed that they always used the lathe carriage for drilling, never the tailstock (Haas slant-bed machines) so yeah using the tool post to drill is a pretty good idea on a manual I bet. Any reason why you couldn't setup a fine feed like .002/rev and let the machine do the work?

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                            • #15
                              I have a dumb question...why is the chuck mounted like this



                              instead of 90o to as it is shown? Wouldn't the 90o way eliminate any tendency for the tool holder to rotate? Or is it just not a problem? It seems like the 90o way would require less material to make.
                              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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