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  • Wet blasting systems

    Looking into the operation of these wet soda blasting systems.

    Specifically, I'm talking about the enclosed cabinet units that recycle the slurry. For anyone who knows more than me about how they operate, do they use both an air compressor to feed the (wet) soda material as well as a power washer pump to produce the high water pressure?
    Last edited by chesterspal; 09-05-2018, 07:35 AM.

  • #2
    Check "Arnold's Design" on YouTube.
    I think he goes into it.
    Len

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    • #3
      Been awhile but the one I used & worked on .Used Glass beads ,was a Fiberglas cabinet rubber lined with an internal powered wiper blade to keep the viewing glass clean & visible .Had a rubber coated pump impeller & housing to pump the slurry .The slurry mix was set by running it without air into a clear jar about 1liter then let it settle & you could then check the ratio of water to glass beads (was about 20% beads I think) . Was very simple worked well used about 50psi air pressure foot control for air , slurry pump ran all the time till shut down .Also had a detergent tank and a pump you would just push in with your knee if the part was oily & there was a separating system that would allow the scum to be removed from the slurry with broken down glass beads etc .

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      • #4
        Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
        Check "Arnold's Design" on YouTube.
        I think he goes into it.
        He dances all around his design but never actually reveals how it works. Does show the making of the nozel, though. That was a big help for me to get started.

        As Stevejw suggests, appears the water slurry, which comes in from the side at an angle, runs continuously. The compressed air is activated via a foot switch and comes straight in from the back.

        There is mention of other pumps, a filter pump for instance, but no details are provided.

        I assumed, maybe incorrectly, the water slurry is provided by a pressure washer, of some unknown PSI, the force of which is then increased by adding the compressed air at the nozel. The question is, will a standard pressure washer pass this glass bead slurry or must that be filtered off or filtered down prior to the water being recirculated and back to the pressure washer pump.

        That would likely be the job of the aforementioned filter pump. The slurry is sucked up by this pump and filtered so only a certain amount of "grit" is allowed to be mixed with the water at one time. Well below the amount that might clog up the pressure washer unit. This reduced grit mix is then fed to the pressure washer.

        Thoughts?
        Last edited by chesterspal; 09-06-2018, 09:42 AM.

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        • #5
          Still not a lot of detail but a place to start;
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRquH0sF0Jc
          Len

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          • #6
            A mystery wrapped in a riddle. He did say it's "very heavy duty" about 12 times so that part we know.

            Looks like we need to figure this out for ourselves.

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            • #7
              The pump is not high pressure ,It was just a centrifugal pump like a swimming pool pump but it was rubber coated to stop the slurry wearing it away. It runs back into the tank as well as the nozzle to stir up the slurry & keep the mix constant that's why it runs all the time .The amount of glass beads you put in sets the ratio of beads to water .That is why you run the pump with no air for a bit to stir up the mix .Then catch some in a clear jar & let it settle .We would try & keep the mix about 20-30% . The air does the work just like a normal sand blaster just that the medium is suspended in water .The Nozzle is larger than an air sand blaster but works the same .The part is hosed off with straight water after the blasting not air .We use to have an anti rusting solution that it would be rinsed in after it came out of the cabinet . As more water is added with the rinsing there was an over flow section to the tank that had separators in it to catch the crap which would mostly float on the top with the broken up glass beads .Back then it had an over flow hose that just ran outside of the workshop into a garden may not be able to do that nowadays .
              Also the Nozzle was not that flexable .We had a mount inside the cabnet to hook the nozzle on and would hold the part & move it around infront of the blaster .If the part was bigger there was a base plate that would turn.The part could be put on that & turned so you didn't have to move the nozzle that much
              Last edited by stevejw; 09-06-2018, 03:03 PM.

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              • #8
                Not trying to hijack this thread, but I have a related question. I occasionally do old-school sandblasting - outdoors with no cabinet - and it is extremely dusty. I was wondering if it might be possible to inject a super-fine water mist above the workpiece to keep the dust down somewhat.

                What do you think?

                metalmagpie

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                  Not trying to hijack this thread, but I have a related question. I occasionally do old-school sandblasting - outdoors with no cabinet - and it is extremely dusty. I was wondering if it might be possible to inject a super-fine water mist above the workpiece to keep the dust down somewhat.

                  What do you think?

                  metalmagpie
                  Probably depends on the type of media you are shooting. I expect a mist to help catch/contain the dust would work but I think just a good powerful fan blowing the "dust" away from your immediate work area would probably work better, and less messy, no?

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                  • #10
                    Just get one of these DB150 Dustless Blasting Equipment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZgwDoG7VUE

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by stevejw View Post
                      Just get one of these DB150 Dustless Blasting Equipment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZgwDoG7VUE
                      OMG that has to be the MOST obnoxious video EVER. The only thing missing is a heavy vamp track in the background.
                      Maybe they have a good product. I sure couldn't watch that thing long enough to find out!

                      MM

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                        OMG that has to be the MOST obnoxious video EVER. The only thing missing is a heavy vamp track in the background.
                        Maybe they have a good product. I sure couldn't watch that thing long enough to find out!

                        MM
                        If you think that video is obnoxious, you must be a Justin Bieber fan. Did you stop watching with disgust after 3:39?

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                        • #13
                          This may be of use: https://www.triumphrat.net/members-r...ml#post2382349

                          There was pictures but I think they were removed in the Photobucket Purge.

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                          • #14
                            Yep made in America wouldn't get a Video like that from Australia LOL
                            just joking

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by stevejw View Post
                              Yep made in America wouldn't get a Video like that from Australia LOL
                              just joking
                              It seems quite a few Americans are just "dead" when it comes to comedic senses. It was actually a good video, but the "dead" won't get it.

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