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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by vpt View Post
    It was bad news for a couple jaguars I put together for a guy. Both are being repainted. Cleaning and paint prep tips were followed to a T too at the paint shop. The soda seems to get embedded in the metal and no cleaning will get it out making the paint pop after awhile. A different place is manually sending out the cars now with da's and repainting.

    Just saying, that would suck. I've heard this to be a common problem with soda blasting after seeing his cars.
    Very interesting!

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

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  • vpt
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Hmm, so far so good with one part I did?

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
    It was bad news for a couple jaguars I put together for a guy. Both are being repainted. Cleaning and paint prep tips were followed to a T too at the paint shop. The soda seems to get embedded in the metal and no cleaning will get it out making the paint pop after awhile. A different place is manually sending out the cars now with da's and repainting.

    Just saying, that would suck. I've heard this to be a common problem with soda blasting after seeing his cars.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by vpt View Post
    If you ever plan to paint anything don't use soda.
    Hmm, so far so good with one part I did?

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

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  • rzbill
    replied
    Originally posted by stevejw View Post
    Just get one of these DB150 Dustless Blasting Equipment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZgwDoG7VUE

    I think I have to buy one now, just because of that excellent ad.

    Leave a comment:


  • AntonLargiader
    replied
    Originally posted by chesterspal View Post
    Do you have a separator tank that houses this submersible pump or is it sitting inside the bottom of your blast cabinet?
    I'm using a converted dry blast cabinet. It's not ideal; it's an early model that Rick made himself when there were few players in the market. So, it has a standard sand-type hopper underneath although it is coated to prevent corrosion. The pump barely fits in it; it's sort of lying on its side. Ideally the bottom would be flat, or at least the hopper would be deep enough that I could build a ledge for the pump to stand upright.

    How are you removing the debris and spent media and what media (type/grit) are you using?
    I use the same 80-grit beads. I periodically drain the hopper into two 5-gallon buckets and pour the dirty water off the top along with whatever media wants to come out. Refill, swish around, dump back in. I am not super technical about the exact media/water ratio. I drain a total of maybe eight gallons of water into two buckets; the first will have 2~3" of media in it and the second will have less than an inch. Some stays in the hopper.

    I have a large enough compressor that I can blast continuously at 10~30 psi, regulated at the machine, with an inexpensive sand blasting nozzle. The pump alone gives a pretty strong stream of media through the nozzle; not much air is needed to jack up the force enough to do some good cleaning. I have a Fantech duct fan pulling air through the cabinet but I need to improve that with a vertical stack that acts like a cyclone separator to let the media and water mist fall back into the cabinet.

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    If you think that video is obnoxious, you must be a Justin Bieber fan. Did you stop watching with disgust after 3:39?
    Never heard of him.

    Leave a comment:


  • vpt
    replied
    If you ever plan to paint anything don't use soda.

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  • chesterspal
    replied
    Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
    For carbs why not just dry soda?
    I've found that using dry soda requires much higher air pressure than I'm able to generate. I could not get any cleaning action at all so I gave up and went back to the coal slag. A bigger, two-stage type compressor would likely give a better result. I'm working off a 3 gallon Harbor Freight "pancake" oil model that dumps into a reserve tank of maybe 40 gallons. That gives me a pretty long run of air before the compressor kicks back on. Then, I need to stop for a bit while the pressure builds back up.

    One major improvement I picked up from a YouTube video... Use the largest diameter hose you can for the run from the compressor to the sand blast cabinet and do the air flow PSI adjustment at the cabinet, not at the compressor. My hose is 50' between the 30' run on the ceiling and 1O' up and down at each end. I use 3/4" ID hose rather than the 3/8" hose that is more common. No restrictions until the regulator at the cabinet.

    Works great!
    Last edited by chesterspal; 09-10-2018, 08:48 AM.

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  • chesterspal
    replied
    Originally posted by AntonLargiader View Post
    I recently upgraded my wet blasting machine with a slurry pump. I talked to one of the Vapor-Hone reps to see about buying the VH internals for the cabinet he had previously sold me, and he steered me toward the Tsurumi "trash pump" that is available at Northern Tool for $2xx.
    This is excellent information. Thank you. There is a drawing on his site that shows the vapor blast pump ($600+) running off a separate motor. Very similar to my idea of using a clothes washer pump, I posted about, above.

    Questions:

    Do you have a separator tank that houses this submersible pump or is it sitting inside the bottom of your blast cabinet?

    How are you removing the debris and spent media and what media (type/grit) are you using?

    He has a ton of technical papers on his site that provide loads of information. He states that glass bead is good for about ten applications before being used up. Now, using it in a slurry may extend or reduce that number... not sure. The 80 grit I'm going to experiment with, since I can get it at easily at Harbor Freight, has a diameter of 6 1/2 thousands. Should be small enough to pass through this test pump I picked up as long as the mix of media to water is kept rather low. I believe something like 20% media was quoted by another poster, here.
    Last edited by chesterspal; 09-10-2018, 08:32 AM.

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  • AntonLargiader
    replied
    I recently upgraded my wet blasting machine with a slurry pump. I talked to one of the Vapor-Hone reps to see about buying the VH internals for the cabinet he had previously sold me, and he steered me toward the Tsurumi "trash pump" that is available at Northern Tool for $2xx. This is a high-flow, low pressure submersible pump that can be dropped into a sump of debris and will pump out the liquid without destroying itself. The output is far more than the blast nozzle can handle, but you use a T fitting so that the excess flow keeps the tank agitated. A small part goes to the nozzle and the bulk of it goes to recirculation/agitation.

    My original machine used air bubbles for agitation (didn't work well) and a venturi to draw the slurry up into the nozzle (didn't work well since the agitation didn't work well). Using the trash pump to agitate the slurry and force-feed it to the nozzle was a 1000% improvement. I can use less air now and the slurry is very consistent.



    I think that is the pump that some or all of the Vapor-Hone products use. Anyway, it was recommended by a guy who knows the wet blasting business very well: https://www.wetblasting.com

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    For carbs why not just dry soda?

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  • chesterspal
    replied
    Seems the separator will be the tricky part in all this. Is this taking place right inside the blast cabinet or is there a secondary tank for the separation?

    Appears you're always adding clean water from the tap, is this correct? Then, letting the garbage that floats to the top drain off and get dumped somewhere outside.

    My needs are small. Cleaning parts like carbs without wearing away the metal. Understand about the potential for impeller wear. Will test with this pump and, if it works, seek out something else.

    I use coal slag in my regular blast cabinet. Works well for cleaning rust and scale, but does pit the metal. Great if you're going to seal or paint as those tiny "craters" will just suck up what is sprayed on them.
    Last edited by chesterspal; 09-09-2018, 07:41 AM.

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  • stevejw
    replied
    The plastic impeller will wear away ,think of pointing a normal sand blaster at it then point it at rubber like a car tyre .The rubber has the ability for the beads to bounce off not scratch will last a lot longer but still wear . Pump needs to be split. one to nozzle ,one to tank correct .Separator :- when the surrey is mixing the heavy good beads will always fall to the bottom of the mix the dirt & small broken beads will be at the top .You need to get the right amount of stirring to mix all the beads but the tank high enough so the very top or over flow pipe is not getting good beads reaching it (a control tap on both the Nozzle & tank return but they will also wear from the slurry) .Adding more water from rinsing the part ,and there was also a small sprayer onto the glass that would work with the wiper blade also filling the tank & over flows taking away the rubbish
    Last edited by stevejw; 09-08-2018, 12:33 PM.

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  • chesterspal
    replied
    Picked up this pool filter pump yesterday at a flea market for $5. Has a plastic impeller and seems the perfect size for what I plan to construct. Will source some 80 grit media and see if it will pass it.



    Something else that would work well would be a washing machine pump. Those are made to pass hair, rug fibers, etc without jamming.

    From your description, the output of the pump needs to split two ways. One to the slurry to stir it up and keep the beads in suspension and another feed to the nozel, correct?

    Can you provide more details on how this "separator" worked?

    Sadly, I had a small injection molded sand blaster cabinet and gave it away when I purchased a bigger steel model. That would have been perfect for this application as no seams to leak. I see them at the swap meets so I'm sure I'll find another one.

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  • stevejw
    replied
    Draw from middle std beads 80 would be fine .Didn't empty system just added more beads as the broken/usedup beads went out with the rubish through the seperator . Only time the system was empted is for maintenance on the pump etc. tank size was about 15 liters .It's a very simple system & I'm sure other ways to do it .

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