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bench top milling machine base bolt pattern

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  • BCRider
    replied
    If you upgrade then I'd strongly suggest a square column style so you can move the head up and down without losing alignment.

    The RF-25 was my own first mill. I had an older MT3 quill model. It was actually surprisingly capable. But it required some careful planning to get around the issue of loss of alignment or registration or whatever you want to call it once the head was loosened to run it up or down on the column. And while the big round column 30's are usually that much better there's still the issue of the round column. So go square and be sure it's one of the cast large box section versions and not the skinny column with the sheet metal "box" cover to make it look burly.

    On the table I'll bet that much of the issue was the casters and the fact that NO FLOOR IS FLAT unless you're darn lucky.... and if you are lucky enough to find a truly planar four spots then mark them and keep the table legs on those four spots. All of which is leading to my next suggestion that is to make at LEAST one foot of the new stand adjustable. It may not be level but at least with a single adjustable foot you can even up the load and remove any wobbles.

    My own mill sat on a rather lighter welded table and never gave me a hint of issues. It's not like a bench lathe where the bench becomes an extension and stiffening element of the bed and for that reason is quite important. You could easily build a somewhat lighter all metal stand, or even a fairly burly wood box style stand, and it would be just fine. But again the key is to have at least one adjustable foot to even up the load and ensure it sits firmly on all four feet. And if you do want it level to a fine degree than go with at least 3 adjustable feet.

    The killer about the stand it is on now is that by comparison to the bandsaw on the left it's clearly way too low to use comfortably unless you do your milling and all setups from a chair. If you normally work while standing I'd suggest you want the mill's table surface to sit at around 42 to 44" off the floor. And in fact for my new setup my knee mill spends most of it's time up around 46 to 48" off the floor. And for my 6' 1" height this works out superbly. I can see the work without the milling head being in the way and I don't have to bend over to do it. You'd adjust this to suit your height of course but it gives you the idea.

    Needless to say if you make the whole table tall enough to end up with the mill's table up that high I'm pretty sure it would suck as a welding table. But that's OK too since you REALLY do not want the weld spatter and typical grinding that welding includes around your mill. A very bad idea that I'm afraid. Any and all welding and grinding should be kept WELL away from machine tools. Like at LEAST 6 ft. And even then I'd throw an old bed sheet or something over the machine tools if anywhere within 10 ft of the welding and grinding area. Actually for 6ft it should really be one of those welding curtains since the last thing you want is the welding sparks setting the protective sheet ablaze. The point is that weld spatter and grinding grit is going to be death to any machine tool so they should not be on the same table without very special care.

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  • AndySomogyi
    replied
    Originally posted by danlb View Post
    Regarding...

    Is there any reason to believe that your future mill will have bolt holes that will fit the 4x4 pattern?
    Main reason, is so I could use it as a utility / assembly table.

    I’m certainly not going to be welding on or near the surface, but a very solid table where I could bolt stuff to and weld it (not near the surface) would be very handy.


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  • danlb
    replied
    Regarding...
    I’m going to put 4 of the pipes at the Grizzly bolt pattern, and the rest at 4” on center.
    Is there any reason to believe that your future mill will have bolt holes that will fit the 4x4 pattern? It's especially doubtful when buying machines from the orient or europe where metric is king.

    I agree with the others who suggest that you set it up for the current mill and alter in the future to whatever spacing your new equipment needs. I've bolted 7 foot tall equipment cabinets to a concrete floor using only expanding anchors and they passed the earthquake tests. Set up anchors with epoxy and you will be good to go.

    I'm also going to suggest that you refrain from welding on top of concrete for the reasons cited above. Search for "concrete spalling welding" on google to learn more about the phenomenon.

    Dan

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  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by AndySomogyi View Post
    Good point, I definitely wasn't planning on welding stuff to the table, just on top of it, so not planning on getting the top hot. If I do weld near it, it will be on top of a scrap piece.

    Ha ha, my "welding table" now is plywood covered with a piece of stainless sheetmetal, and if that hasn't caught fire yet, I'm thinking the concrete one, with a bit of care should be OK.
    Think about it like throwing a beach stone in a fire.

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  • AndySomogyi
    replied
    Good point, I definitely wasn't planning on welding stuff to the table, just on top of it, so not planning on getting the top hot. If I do weld near it, it will be on top of a scrap piece.

    Ha ha, my "welding table" now is plywood covered with a piece of stainless sheetmetal, and if that hasn't caught fire yet, I'm thinking the concrete one, with a bit of care should be OK.

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  • andywander
    replied
    If you use for welding, and you get the metal top hot, the concrete will blow apart in that area.

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  • AndySomogyi
    replied
    Here’s the design of my table (yes, I know, I really really need to learn how to use CAD, pretty sad because I also teach a few computer science courses).

    I’m going to pre-drill the holes in the top sheet, weld on 1/2 pipe that will go through the concrete, and I’ll cast the concrete around the pipes. Basically turn the top upside down, build a box and pour the concrete into it.

    I figure I can also use the table as a welding table.

    I’m going to put 4 of the pipes at the Grizzly bolt pattern, and the rest at 4” on center.

    Making the base and cradle out of 1/4” wall 3” square box section.


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  • loose nut
    replied
    Easy Peasy.

    You can either set the mill where you want it and "mark" the base through the holes or just measure the center to center distances between the holes, in both directions and then lay it out on the base where you want it. You might find it on the Grizzly web site under user manuals for that mill.

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  • Joel
    replied
    I can't imagine base holes being any kind of standardized or consistent enough (even with the same 'batch' of machines), so do as Noitoen suggests, or use one of the standard anchor styles.

    As 3ph said, the base looks pretty good, except for having castors. Are you confident that they aren't accounting for most of your distaste? Add smaller foot pads (preferably that allow leveling), a little more 'beefing up' with 2x's couldn't hurt and would be cheap and easy.

    Also, a really heavy base is very advantageous for a lathe, not as much for a mill.

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    You can make it nice and flat then drill the holes in any location and use some studs with resin. These chemical fixed studs are hard as rock.

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  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    That table you have should actually be quite solid. Maybe just tighten up the screws and bolts and re-evaluate it. That mill should be happy sitting on anything and I think what you've got already is good enough. I'd suggest removing the casters if you don't need them, evaluate the structure and just get it back into it's original condition which looks more than suitable. Maybe add cross bracing in any areas that doesn't already have it.

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  • AndySomogyi
    started a topic bench top milling machine base bolt pattern

    bench top milling machine base bolt pattern

    Hi All,

    I've got a Grizzly RF25 clone that I'm making a concrete/steel table for in the interest of stability and solidness.

    I'm casting the mounting holes for the concrete at 16" x 10".

    In the future, I might upgrade to a better mill, maybe an RF30 or a square column style.

    Would you guys know the bolt hole pattern the base of these more common machines, or other popular bench top mills? I'd like the pre-make these holes in my table, so if I switch to one of these, I can just bolt it up.

    FYI, I bough this thing used and it came sitting on this horrible wooden crap thing, flops around like crazy on it. Sure hoping a 4” thick reinforced concrete table sitting on 1/4” 3” square box section will make it more solid, figure the table and stand alone will be be about 400 lbs.




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