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American precision museum, vermont sort of OT but relavent

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  • American precision museum, vermont sort of OT but relavent

    Found a new place to add to the list of things to see, the American precision museum
    Apparently during the great exhibition in Crystal Palace London the arms manufacturer got a medal for 6 rifles with completely interchangeable parts (beating demming by 100 years btw), the British were so impressed that they sent a delegation to Williamsburg to completely re tool the lee Enfield factory, which they did at massive cost, the place is crammed full of lathes mills, copy lathes and all sorts, definately a destination for those with old iron and machining tendencies.
    Mark

  • #2
    While they did win the medals the Great Expo took place 40 years before the Lee Enfield existed so probably the Pattern 1853 Enfield rifle.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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    • #3
      I stand corrected, the armoury that lee enfeilds were eventually made in, which had apparently been there quite some time, woolwich arsenal I think, whatever it was that made cannons and bang sticks.
      Mark

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      • #4
        Originally posted by boslab View Post
        Found a new place to add to the list of things to see, the American precision museum
        Apparently during the great exhibition in Crystal Palace London the arms manufacturer got a medal for 6 rifles with completely interchangeable parts (beating demming by 100 years btw), the British were so impressed that they sent a delegation to Williamsburg to completely re tool the lee Enfield factory, which they did at massive cost, the place is crammed full of lathes mills, copy lathes and all sorts, definately a destination for those with old iron and machining tendencies.
        Mark
        The city of Torrington, CT is trying to decide what to do with one of their "brownfield" locations, the former Hendey Machine site.
        It'd be perfect for a manufacturing museum.
        Len

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        • #5
          Originally posted by boslab View Post
          Found a new place to add to the list of things to see, the American precision museum
          Apparently during the great exhibition in Crystal Palace London the arms manufacturer got a medal for 6 rifles with completely interchangeable parts (beating demming by 100 years btw), the British were so impressed that they sent a delegation to Williamsburg to completely re tool the lee Enfield factory, which they did at massive cost, the place is crammed full of lathes mills, copy lathes and all sorts, definately a destination for those with old iron and machining tendencies.
          Mark
          I've been there! It's pretty neat; it has a small active shop area where they demonstrate some basic processes like hobbing gears and using a small turret lathe. There is also a cabinet with an impressive collection of miniature line shaft machines. There was also a very interesting lathe whose bed was made from big slabs of granite. Not a huge museum by any means, but still a neat place.

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          • #6
            I got the impression it was fairly big, the building is at least, nice brickwork, looked like the starret factory, either way it’s so important that the whole interchangeable parts concept started in that building (I think),
            Mark

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            • #7
              I and friend volunteer there just before they open for the summer , we go there to lube and make new drive belts for the miniature machines in the 2 cases , and make as many as we can operate , what a joy to be able to touch , and operate these machines (they really do machine) , the man that built them I'm told was retired and bored so he went down stairs (cellar) and started building these machines over a period of 20 years .

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