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  • scrapyards

    i often sell scrap to the local scrapyard. They often have huge amounts of rebar,some of which i guess is even as thick as 40mm. Is this a poor quality material or can it clean up nicely. The difference is a 1km trip compared to an 80km trip.

  • #2
    Hi,

    Rebar is generally made from whatever got swept up off the floor at the end of the day. It is possible to get some that machines OK, but I wouldn't bet on it.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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    • #3
      Can be literally anything, from sort of ok to miserable stuff. Chucking the rebar sucks too.

      I wouldn't use it unless the mean looking guy with submachine gun forces me..
      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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      • #4
        Yea, what's the guy with the Ar15 doing there? Is he protecting the rebar from being stolen?

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        • #5
          A mill a few miles from me grinds up junk cars and turns them into rebar.
          “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

          Lewis Grizzard

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          • #6
            Maybe some of that smooth stuff is jail bar.

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            • #7
              I'd focus on any drive axles you find lying around, like the one at the bottom of one of those pictures. Might be a little tough, but guaranteed to be way better steel than rebar.

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              • #8
                While rebar is not great for machining, it will generally weld OK. Logically, it should be structurally sound since a major use is to prestress concrete.

                While it would not be my first choice, if it were cheap enough I'd keep some in the shop for making jigs and such.

                Dan
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                Location: SF East Bay.

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                • #9
                  When I was a kid learning about all this stuff, I turned a lot of rebar because I could it cheaply and easily. Sometimes it turned like any other A36 steel (which isn't great but not terrible) and other times I'd hit weird inclusions that were hard. Given half the chance, I'd avoid it. Like Dan said, it can be good for other things. I use rebar for stakes and trellises, blacksmith tongs, low strength cheater/pry bars, etc.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                    I'd focus on any drive axles you find lying around, like the one at the bottom of one of those pictures. Might be a little tough, but guaranteed to be way better steel than rebar.
                    Or hydraulic cylinder piston rods or worn out jackhammer steel. Jackhammer steel bits are also supposed to be good for forging, but no personal experience.

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                    • #11
                      Driveshafts or Jackhammer steel bits can be a real pain if you need to drill or tap... just to keep in mind that they are not the easiest material to machine.
                      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                      • #12
                        He is in the South Africa. Security is probably the second largest business there. Crime may be the first.

                        I once got invited to South Africa to do home security systems. I was promised customers who would take my advice, wouldn't argue about any price they could afford that wasn't obvious bull****, and who wouldn't screw around with those partial garbage systems sold by the mass market companies in the USA. I looked up a little on the market and decided to stay home. LOL.
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                        • #13
                          Plunger, I would say buy some and try it out. I have used it a few times and found it more than adequate for the sort of home shop things I do.

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                          • #14
                            Interestingly, they call shops that work on car bodies "panel beaters" or "panel and paint". I guess "body shop" has a different meaning there judging by the armed guard at a scrap yard.

                            I looked up the place across the street (now called "Melz") and found your Atlas Scrap Yard. Looks like a small place unless the buildings in the back are part of it. Larger scrap yards typically have a better selection.

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                            • #15
                              Rebar comes in different grades. Grade 40 is 40,000 psi and is nice for forming (bending). The higher the number (yield strength) the harder it is to bend. There is a designation called "ungraded" and appears to be more what has been described by other posters. I used to buy deformed rebar by the ton directly from the steel mills.

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