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Does this collet holder have any specific purpose?

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  • Does this collet holder have any specific purpose?

    Collet holder, takes erickson type, fits in shank, closer tube goes over it, nut pulls tube tight to close. Belong to a relative.

    Because it has no drawbar, seems like it is drill press tooling.... drills, reamers, and ??

    There is a set of 3, each taking 5 or 6 of a set of the collets, nice old case, very well made parts. Collets from 1/8 or so to 1/2". of the holders 2 are MT 2, one MT1.

    Possibly automotive due to the shop they came out of, biut might be from 1930s or so. Just wondering if they are for some specific machine.....

    CNC machines only go through the motions

  • #2
    Could also be used in a lathe tail stock.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #3
      Tailstock on a lathe woud be my bet. Cant see anybody going through the trouble of using collets on a drill press, but a lathe i could see someone going nuts for the extra accuracy.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
        Tailstock on a lathe woud be my bet. Cant see anybody going through the trouble of using collets on a drill press, but a lathe i could see someone going nuts for the extra accuracy.
        If you wanted extra accuracy, you'd use Morse Taper tooling, not a collet holder and collet which would create tolerance stack up. Even endmills and reamers are available with M.T. shanks.

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        • #5
          MT-2. Fits my lathe. ILL TAKE IT!!! lol Thats where I would use it. JR

          I thought I saw something like that in my shop, I have a lot of MT-2 tang tooling for my lathes.

          One is marked erickson and the other is unmarked.

          I checked the patent number and didnt see any ideas for use (lathe or drill) so its prolly used for both JR



          Pat. 2228685

          http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-P...&RS=PN/2228685
          Last edited by JRouche; 09-12-2018, 09:20 PM.

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          • #6
            Shop the set came out of apparently had no lathe, just drill press, so that's where they used it I suppose.

            Collets were possibly to handle a range of sizes for reamers etc, not for the precision.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #7
              My guess is for lathe spindle , for use with milling attachment.
              Or for cross slide vise in drill press.. milling tends to make drill chucks pop off the taper.l

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              • #8
                Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
                Tailstock on a lathe woud be my bet. Cant see anybody going through the trouble of using collets on a drill press, but a lathe i could see someone going nuts for the extra accuracy.
                Turret lathe or special ops machine. I couldn't see any one using it in place of a chuck either.

                JL.....

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                • #9
                  I have some of the multisplit collets that came off a high speed drill for brushes, like toothbrushes, the machine drilled the hole pattern and poked nylon bristles into the hole, the spindles ran up to 30k rpm so the solid carbide drills were small, 10 thou up to what looks about 1 mm.
                  Mark

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                  • #10
                    Not likely to be turret lathe, they almost never use a taper mount.

                    Probably just drills and reamers in drill press.

                    Thans.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #11
                      I remember seeing arbors like that in a rack many years ago in an auto engine repair shop. Each arbor had a different tapered stone mounted in it. Torn down heads were sitting on the steel bench. So I'm guessing some valve seat grinding application was involved using them. Don't recall seeing any specific machine for them. But the shop was loaded with machines that I had no idea what there purpose was.

                      JL.................

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                      • #12
                        The collet appears to be a common "double angle" or DA type.

                        What's different here is the closing sleeve, the part marked "Erickson", not the way those collets are usually closed. All of mine use an end nut similar to a closing nut for an ER collet. Makes me wonder if that sleeve might have a function in somehow guiding and/or centering whatever is in the collet with respect to an existing hole the sleeve fits closely into. Or, possibly the sleeve is smaller in diameter than the usual closing nut allowing the tool to get into closer confines.

                        If you can figure out the series of DA collet you show I'll measure the closing nut diameter of one of mine. The series numbers are like DA100, DA200, etc. If the sleeve diameter is significantly less that the nut diameter that might confirm my theory.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 754 View Post
                          My guess is for lathe spindle , for use with milling attachment.
                          Or for cross slide vise in drill press.. milling tends to make drill chucks pop off the taper.l
                          There is no drawbar option or other obvious locking mechanism so it's not suited for milling. Milling with morse taper tools is guaranteed way to loosen up the morse taper...

                          I have used ER collet chuck numerous times in a drill press when I want minimum runout with small carbide drills. Some of the heavier build drill presses also come with milling option but in that case there is one way or another to lock the morse taper.
                          Swedish Arboga for example uses large external nut to lock the morse taper to spindle.
                          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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