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  • darryl
    replied
    This goes back in time for sure. This fellow sure does have a nicely equipped shop- with a lathe, even though it's a glass blowers lathe. He exhibits some serious skill all through the process of creating these tubes. I normally wouldn't watch for that long, but I was impressed with his workmanship.

    The nixie tube- can you imagine the cost of such a readout today? Each of those tubes has to be worth several tens of dollars considering all the steps needed to produce them.

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  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    I've always wanted to make an "arc" display and create a 7 segment type display but use high freq and high voltage injection to create plasma bars.

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by Benta View Post
    I think this link is a bit more useful:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixie_tube
    Thank you. Now I know, but I don't think the knowledge is going to change my life, somehow.

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  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by paul463 View Post
    I think the neon is actually slightly positive pressure.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    I just figured it out. They heat the glass stem just enough and evenly for the vacuum to suck in the glass and cause the seal.

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  • MaxHeadRoom
    replied
    Another couple neon related of the same vintage, was the neon tube voltage regulator and the Dekatron counter tube.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3HLZOJKEQU
    Max.
    Last edited by MaxHeadRoom; 09-13-2018, 02:56 PM.

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  • sarge41
    replied
    Very interesting, Darryl. Thanks for sharing. I was always amazed when watching the display on the big Onsrud bridge mill in the shop that I served out in. When readouts on the two axis display (of the G.E. controls) were moving rapidly, the nixie's were just a blur. I was there almost 30 years and it was still doing its job with rarely a problem with the display.

    Sarge41

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    How does he maintain the vacuum+ neon gas when cutting/sealing the stem tubes? I would expect the vacuum to be immediately lost as soon as the glass stem tube is soft enough for atmospheric pressure to blow into the tube.
    Probably the same way that they did it when they made vacuum tubes or light bulbs.

    They were probably filled in a box type environment filled with the neon gas at the right pressure and the end sealed in that atmosphere before being removed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U70-VcmiUM0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxL4ElboiuA

    JL...............
    Last edited by JoeLee; 09-13-2018, 01:56 PM.

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  • paul463
    replied
    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    How does he maintain the vacuum+ neon gas when cutting/sealing the stem tubes? I would expect the vacuum to be immediately lost as soon as the glass stem tube is soft enough for atmospheric pressure to blow into the tube.
    I think the neon is actually slightly positive pressure.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    How does he maintain the vacuum+ neon gas when cutting/sealing the stem tubes? I would expect the vacuum to be immediately lost as soon as the glass stem tube is soft enough for atmospheric pressure to blow into the tube.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    The funkyness of them comes from the fact that the numbers are all stacked front to back so when the numbers change the depth of the light changes too. Only slightly noticeable if you're dead on axis with the centerline. But shift your head just a few degrees and if the numbers are changing a lot it's like they are doing a nervous shuffle.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    Without having to watch a 40 minute video, educate me - what in the world is a nixie tube?
    Prehistoric LED basically.
    Vacuum tube digit or letter. Before LED or liquid quartz displays. They were common in electronic equipment up to about the mid 70's.

    JL...............

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  • paul463
    replied
    I watched that one a few weeks back. Pretty cool.

    I now have a bug to build a Nixie clock. eBay is loaded with Russian made surplus Nixie tubes..... I've ordered a few IN12 and IN14 size to save for a rainy day project.


    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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  • Benta
    replied
    I think this link is a bit more useful:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixie_tube

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    Without having to watch a 40 minute video, educate me - what in the world is a nixie tube?
    Google Clock with Nixie tubes

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Without having to watch a 40 minute video, educate me - what in the world is a nixie tube?

    Leave a comment:

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