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Gib... I am in an alternate universe..

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  • Gib... I am in an alternate universe..

    I have been around machinery all my life. My dad has built a machine shop from the ground up. I come from a family wanting to do everything themselves. (I thought everyone fixed their own tv's and such. It was only after going to school did I figure out we were the odd ones out.)

    Anyways - I have been working on a small cnc machine and was adjusting the Gibs.. I went to youtube to see how others adjust them on similar machines. The guy on one video was pronouncing it Jib. I sort of laughed. Then thought - hmmm maybe I have been pronouncing it wrong. I have always pronounced it with a hard G. I guess I was wrong.

    I feel like the Dr Emmitt Brown pronouncing Gigawatts as Jigawatts..

    sam

  • #2
    Yea like you would say the boys name Gilbert. A jib is one of those things on a "hole in the water" called a boat. :-)
    ...lew...

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    • #3
      So is it Jim or Gary in the States?

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      • #4
        Well, there is, after all, giblet gravy ...pronounced "jiblet." So it's not surprising some would say "jib."
        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by lynnl View Post
          Well, there is, after all, giblet gravy ...pronounced "jiblet." So it's not surprising some would say "jib."
          There's also the Gibbon ape, pronounced with a hard 'g'.
          Regards, Marv

          Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
          http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

          Location: LA, CA, USA

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
            ... I went to youtube to see how others adjust them on similar machines.
            YouTube videos should not be trusted on questions of pronunciation. A better idea: consult a dictionary.
            Allan Ostling

            Phoenix, Arizona

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            • #7
              well - Webster pronounces it with a 'J'

              https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gib

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              • #8
                Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
                well - Webster pronounces it with a 'J'

                https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gib
                Sounds like a 'g' to me. Dictionary.com also pronounces it with a hard 'g'...

                https://www.dictionary.com/browse/gib?s=t
                Regards, Marv

                Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                Location: LA, CA, USA

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
                  well - Webster pronounces it with a 'J'

                  https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gib
                  Nope, the pronunciation notation for that link shows "\'gib\" which I assume is a hard "g". And the little speaker button that gives me the audio came back with a hard "g" as well.

                  But MW also only shows the meaning as being a castrated cat. No mention of a machine tool part.

                  Wiktionary, which is admittedly questionable since it's built up from contributions by regular folk, calls for a hard "g" as well. And while our poor castrated cat is there as well at least it also mentions a bolt or wedge of wood or metal to hold a machine part in place.

                  But then along we go to Oxford and press the audio pronunciation key and I get a "j". The cat got away on this one though. Just the machine part.

                  https://www.dictionary.com/browse/gib takes us back to a hard "g" again.

                  And finally, although not the last of such sources, Collins Dictionary online gives me back a hard "g" as well.

                  So although the word certainly comes from England originally, and thus the Oxford version with a "j" sound should have some higher weighting, it would seem that just by popular vote among the rest that it's a hard "g".

                  One last try on "gib definition" at the last second and the Google dictionary gives me a "j" sound as well. Which sort of muddies the water a little. So it would appear that either is right with some slight preference for the hard "g". But don't be surprised to hear a "j" either. Just make sure we're up to speed on the discussion so we know if it's about a boat, machine, old spawning salmon or that forlorn looking cat in the corner....
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #10
                    The "G" is silent.
                    Len

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                      So although the word certainly comes from England originally, and thus the Oxford version with a "j" sound should have some higher weighting, it would seem that just by popular vote among the rest that it's a hard "g".
                      American english and British english are sometimes pronounced completely differently so this could depend where you live.
                      And with some words you have same pronounciation but different spelling(written) form like tyre vs. tire. And tire vs. tire when it's a verb

                      I learnt british english at school but bigger part of movies and tv shows are in US english around here. But we have quite many UK series also on telly...
                      Sometimes really confusing as I'm not sure if I pronounce some word completely wrong or just british vs us english.
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=G7fZGrsnC4Q
                      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                      • #12
                        So - I am pronouncing it right?

                        all is well with the world again...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                          Nope, the pronunciation notation for that link shows "\'gib\" which I assume is a hard "g". And the little speaker button that gives me the audio came back with a hard "g" as well.

                          But MW also only shows the meaning as being a castrated cat. No mention of a machine tool part.

                          Wiktionary, which is admittedly questionable since it's built up from contributions by regular folk, calls for a hard "g" as well. And while our poor castrated cat is there as well at least it also mentions a bolt or wedge of wood or metal to hold a machine part in place.

                          But then along we go to Oxford and press the audio pronunciation key and I get a "j". The cat got away on this one though. Just the machine part.

                          https://www.dictionary.com/browse/gib takes us back to a hard "g" again.

                          And finally, although not the last of such sources, Collins Dictionary online gives me back a hard "g" as well.

                          So although the word certainly comes from England originally, and thus the Oxford version with a "j" sound should have some higher weighting, it would seem that just by popular vote among the rest that it's a hard "g".

                          One last try on "gib definition" at the last second and the Google dictionary gives me a "j" sound as well. Which sort of muddies the water a little. So it would appear that either is right with some slight preference for the hard "g". But don't be surprised to hear a "j" either. Just make sure we're up to speed on the discussion so we know if it's about a boat, machine, old spawning salmon or that forlorn looking cat in the corner....
                          But MW also only shows the meaning as being a castrated cat. No mention of a machine tool part.
                          If you scroll down a bit MW gives this also as a definition.
                          : a plate of metal or other material machined to hold other parts in place, to afford a bearing surface, or to provide means for overcoming looseness
                          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                          • #14
                            This actually comes up from time to time on here and other machinist forums. I pronounce it with the hard g - like "give" but with the -ve replaced by -b. However, it seems that "jib" is the accepted pronunciation in certain regions. Tomayto, tomahto, right?

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                            • #15
                              I use hard G gib, lest it get confused with boat or crane parts.

                              My poor buddy who knows little, too smart to ask needs one for an Elliot mill.
                              When he said said he could not find info online, i spelled out for him, he said no wonder i could only find boat stuff..
                              Do some reading and research buddy.. you still need one..

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