Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Speaking of ... things ...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Speaking of ... things ...

    Not sure why, but the jumper cable thread made me think of this./

    Some years back I flipped a truck towing a boat. A feral burro ran jumped in front of the truck from off the hillside. The truck had an ALUMINUM work cap on the back. That aluminum work cap certainly saved us all personal injury. The front of the cab was totally caved in, but the rear was fine. In fact it was untouched because the aluminum cap held up the truck. My son was riding in the back seat. We wound up inverted hanging from our seat belts. The only injury was when I released my seat belt my passenger next to me had his arm under me and I injured his shoulder. I won't name the brand of the truck, but it was a 2008 model and I remember being very disappointed that the OnStar service didn't automatically activate like they showed In the commercials.

    I swerved, went into a fish tail, and flipped. By the time the truck flipped we were doing almost zero MPH. In my youth I spent a lot of time in the desert and what I did would have been fine. On some little desert two track I'd have just driven out into the desert and straightened her out. Unfortunately on that little two lane paved road there was a guard rail and a drop off on both sides by the time I was trying to correct the fishtail, and the fish tail was to wide to gas it and drive it out. I was just trying to do half corrections and scrub some speed. I've since been told even at low speeds (we were only doing about 35) the best chance of survivability and minimized damage is to stay straight and brake hard to minimize the impact with the animal. I argued against that when I first heard it. I knew people who died from hitting livestock. The animal came up over the hood and through the windshield. One hit a horse and the animal went up in the air and came down and crushed the cab of the truck he was driving. Admittedly most of those people were driving way to fast. Not just to fast for conditions, but just plain speeding. Well, that was in my mind at the time. In fact several scenarios went through my mind as I chose what course of action to take. (Everything goes in slow motion for me and I pick and chose my options in a crisis.) I picked the wrong one. At the speed we were going braking would certainly have been the best option, although the burro was very close when it jumped in front of us out of the dark. I had several people tell me that, but I didn't believe them. Then a fellow I know from Africa told me the same. Brake as fast as you can and keep her straight, and nobody drives fast on the savanna unless they are being chased by bandits.

    Well, we were not driving fast atleast. At freeway speed its going to bad no matter what, but at slower speeds just hold course and brake hard. A rollover at freeway speed vs that massive impact and the risk of throwing the animal up in the air. Neither way is going to end well.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  • #2
    Every situation is different - cannot comment on what's right or wrong without a list of about a thousand different variables - some which would change the outcome all by themselves and others which affect others than can change the outcome...

    Comment


    • #3
      Almost forgot. The cap had thousands of dollars worth of tools and in the compartments. There was more tools, equipment, and materials in the bed. The boat was well loaded with fishing gear probably a couple grand just in rods and reels. I also had some expensive extra tall double sided ladders on the rack. Those didn't survive the wreck. The tow truck drivers were obviously annoyed that I insisted both vehicles be dropped in my driveway instead of letting them park them in their yard. One seemed belligerent and almost angry when he said, "Fine, then you will have to pay the towing bill tonight before we unload them." I looked at the other driver and he looked embarrassed. I am aware that the stuff they make you sign says they are not responsible for lost personal items. The one driver's reaction made me wonder if I would have been unable to do my job if I'd let them take my vehicles to their yard.
      *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm glad you called it 'feral' because that's exactly what they are.. and so called 'wild' horses also.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by softtail View Post
          I'm glad you called it 'feral' because that's exactly what they are.. and so called 'wild' horses also.
          One of our fellow riders hit one last night on Hwy 95.

          https://www.kyma.com/news/motorcycle...y-95/794399413

          He walked away with only minor scratches.
          *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

          Comment


          • #6
            Moose accidents are common here in Finland and Scandinavia.
            I had just got my drivers license when 1-year calf jumped in front of me from behind the bushes in the ravine or gully.
            Heavy incoming traffic and wooden light poles on ravine side so only had time and space to swerve slightly to left so that the moose calf hit on the passenger side A-pillar instead of full frontal collision and getting the moose trough windscreen.
            Entire windscreen was smashed, passenger side window "exploded" inwards cutting my friends face full of small cuts. A-pillar bent slightly, moose went partly over the car roof and landed on opposite lane where mobile home hit on it.

            Swedes have some 6000 moose crashes per year and they are extensively testing car models for moose crash test's and moose swerve test.
            Some of the test results are pretty scary:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaYFLb8WMGM (jeep cherokee failing the swerve test)

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98ZK_kknP9U
            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

            Comment


            • #7
              A friend of my father expired when he hit a Bull with a VW microbus. With only 1/16th of an inch of metal between him and the bull he never had a chance.

              Comment


              • #8
                Take this for what it's worth, but I have always tried to keep up with what the limits of my particular vehicle are. I want to know how it's going to handle in a fast maneuver so that when I need the skill I'll have it- best as possible of course. Sometimes you are simply outgunned and the animal wins (loses). When I get a chance, I will test the limits of my vehicle, get into some skids, check out the roll and grip characteristics, etc. I can't say that braking as hard as possible beats an avoidance maneuver when it can be performed. Towing anything certainly throws a wrench into this- handling your vehicle is one thing, keeping your train from derailing is another. I am always a little squeamish when I've got anything on my tow ball- I don't really like to test this kind of thing much.
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by darryl View Post
                  Take this for what it's worth, but I have always tried to keep up with what the limits of my particular vehicle are. I want to know how it's going to handle in a fast maneuver so that when I need the skill I'll have it- best as possible of course. Sometimes you are simply outgunned and the animal wins (loses). When I get a chance, I will test the limits of my vehicle, get into some skids, check out the roll and grip characteristics, etc. I can't say that braking as hard as possible beats an avoidance maneuver when it can be performed. Towing anything certainly throws a wrench into this- handling your vehicle is one thing, keeping your train from derailing is another. I am always a little squeamish when I've got anything on my tow ball- I don't really like to test this kind of thing much.
                  Back when I used to buy a beater for $150 - $300 and was thrilled if I didn't have to work on it to get it started I'd take them out in the desert and beat on them hard to see what would fall off. The whole gamut. Low hill jumps, hand brake turns (if it had a hand brake), power on drifting, etc. Sadly that was a brand new 1/2 ton crew cab 4x4 truck. I hadn't even done the first oil change on it yet. On a positive note, I had made a decent trade in and it had more than 50% equity. That was when the price of diesel was climbing sky high and everybody was selling their diesels. I wound up replacing it with a less than one year old 3/4 ton 4x4 crew cab turbo diesel for only a couple grand more than my insurance check. Still have that truck. Absolute best truck I have EVER owned. Sadly I still have the same boat on the same now bent trailer with one slightly bent axle (upwards). LOL. Oddly enough it tracks straight and doesn't eat tires. I'm in the process of putting new carpet in the boat now... Overall it could have been worse.
                  *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X