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Spiral cutter sharpening advice using a T&C grinder

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  • Spiral cutter sharpening advice using a T&C grinder

    I have an old Stanley power hand planer used generally for doors. I posted about it in another thread. I was hoping to find a reasonably priced replacement however I can't find one at a price I think is worth spending. I have a KO Lee T&C grinder with limited tooling and even more limited experience using it. I have a set of centers which, as was suggested in the other thread, I could use to sharpen the cutter. This is the way I understand this is done:
    Make a mandrel, with centers and a good fit, to hold the cutter.
    Mount the mandrel with cutter in place between the grinder centers.
    Make some sort of finger that will attach to the grinder motor so that is follows the helical shape of the cutter.
    Wind a string around the mandrel with a weighted end so the cutter rotates as it progresses past the stone.
    Set the cutter and stone so that the existing angle of the edge is duplicated while being sharpened.

    Please let me know if I am making any glaring errors in the above. I only have some basic AO wheels for the grinder and the cutter is carbide. I do have a couple of flat green wheels that I have purchased to sharpen carbide using a bench grinder and these can fit on the T&C grinder. Which am I better off using for this single operation?
    Many thanks,

  • #2
    The weighted string is not the way I've done it. I use my hands to assure the cutter is in contact with the guide finger. Not saying the weighted string won't work, just never did it that way.

    Not sure about the green wheels. I use a fine grit diamond wheel. My experience with green wheels has been with fairly coarse grit which doesn't give the highly polished finish that seems best for wood cutting.


    BTW: I've had several of the spiral cutters, didn't realize they ever made any with carbide.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes this is definitely carbide, I think [emoji16].
      A diamond wheel is certainly not in the budget.
      Thanks

      Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

      Comment


      • #4
        is it a spiral or a helix or both? it'd be nice to have a photo or link so we knew what it looked it like....but typically helical cutters that you'd put on an arbor are done as DR says, hand held with the helix following a tooth rest.

        A finger that bolts to the table is a useful accessory, you want some way to adjust the height.
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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        • #5
          Bolting the finger to the table wouldn't be very effective would it? [emoji16]
          Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
          is it a spiral or a helix or both? it'd be nice to have a photo or link so we knew what it looked it like....but typically helical cutters that you'd put on an arbor are done as DR says, hand held with the helix following a tooth rest.

          A finger that bolts to the table is a useful accessory, you want some way to adjust the height.


          Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            Originally posted by challenger View Post
            Bolting the finger to the table wouldn't be very effective would it? [emoji16]
            lol, well you got me there.....looked around for a few photos, I must have been thinking of how the rest was under the work like in the first pic.....but in that set up the tooth rest is bolted to the air bearing body and the table is stationary. i also found some photos of the tooth rest attached to the spindle as I should have said <embarrassed grin>.






            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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            • #7
              The "finger" needs to be adjustable up and down to set the grind angles.
              It also might best be "L" or "T" shaped so you can get the wheel on and off the work without losing contact with the guide finger.

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              • #8
                The finger remains stationary, directly above or below the point of contact between the grinding wheel and the tool being ground.

                Your green silicon carbide wheels won't do you much good in this application...they will wear too quickly. Like it or not, you need a diamond wheel for this.

                Perhaps a lathe mandrel will work to hold the cutter. They can be had fairly cheaply from Travers Tool, Victor, McMaster Carr, etc..

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
                  The finger remains stationary, directly above or below the point of contact between the grinding wheel and the tool being ground.

                  Your green silicon carbide wheels won't do you much good in this application...they will wear too quickly. Like it or not, you need a diamond wheel for this.

                  Perhaps a lathe mandrel will work to hold the cutter. They can be had fairly cheaply from Travers Tool, Victor, McMaster Carr, etc..
                  I'm not sure if the comment regarding the finger was directed at my previous post, but to be clear.

                  Yes, the finger remains stationary while grinding, but in SETTING the angles, It is very helpful if the guid finger is easily adjustable. There is a reason K.O.Lee made their pieces the way they do.

                  In addition, The "finger" can be placed at the contact point of the wheel, But if a narrow or pointed finger falls off the work at the ends. The workpiece corners will show the difficulty. Not something anyone wants to see in a planer blade.

                  Considering how much (or little) material needs to be removed to sharpen, if all geometry is retained. I would think a green wheel will do just fine. Certainly worth the try.
                  It's not like you will always be left with a taper due to wheel wear. The work moves in and out! ;-)

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=challenger;1194833]Bolting the finger to the table wouldn't be very effective would it? [emoji16]


                    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk[/QUOTE] Not unless your cutter was mounted on an arbor in a spin fixture with enough travel to cover the length of the cutter.

                    I can't believe that cutter is carbide. I've seen a few of those power hand planners but never saw one with a carbide cutter.

                    JL.....

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                      [QUOTE=challenger;1194833]Bolting the finger to the table wouldn't be very effective would it? [emoji16]


                      Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
                      Not unless your cutter was mounted on an arbor in a spin fixture with enough travel to cover the length of the cutter.

                      I can't believe that cutter is carbide. I've seen a few of those power hand planners but never saw one with a carbide cutter.

                      JL.....[/QUOTE]

                      The photo certainly does not appear to show a carbide cutter.

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                      • #12
                        That cutter is hss, if it had carbide edges, they would be inlaid and brazed or silver soldered to the steel centre which would be obvious.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post

                          Perhaps a lathe mandrel will work to hold the cutter. They can be had fairly cheaply from Travers Tool, Victor, McMaster Carr, etc..
                          Sooner or later, you're going to want/need a set of these: https://www.ebay.com/itm/K-O-LEE-Co-...sAAOSwmrpbifm0
                          The smaller range K.O. Lee sets sometimes come up on Fleabay, that's how I got mine.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                            Sooner or later, you're going to want/need a set of these: https://www.ebay.com/itm/K-O-LEE-Co-...sAAOSwmrpbifm0
                            The smaller range K.O. Lee sets sometimes come up on Fleabay, that's how I got mine.
                            Those looked pretty beat up and hacked, parts missing too.
                            But on ebay everybody thinks they have gold.

                            JL..............

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You can bolt to table for straight cutters, but you must have the finger stay with the wheel for helical cutters.

                              No harm if the finger is with the wheel for straight cutters also.
                              CNC machines only go through the motions.

                              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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