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Sunny 6x18 Surface Grinder

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  • Sunny 6x18 Surface Grinder

    Or should i say MY Sunny 6x18 surface grinder. Ive been looking for one for a while, nothing fancy, just some used old thing for a decent enough price i could justify my hamfisted attempts to learn on. Before anybody gives me crap about how i shouldve been looking for a piece of good ol' american iron, think carefully about whether you want a backyard warrior beating on that ol' american iron...

    Anyway ive been keeping an eye on all the usual suspects with no luck, started saving up for Grizzlys annual tent sale hoping id stumble into something for a decent price. Left the tent sale disappointed, as not only was the selection of stuff way, way lower than years past, the prices were higher too. Only 2 grinders there, both priced massively above what i could afford. Went home, did some searching, found a place called Holloway Industrial Sales and waddaya know, they had the aforementioned grinder listed for $750.

    Took a trip down there to take a look at it, not fantastic but not horrible either. Name plate dates it to 1984, so its seen some years and a fair bit of use, going off the ways. The wear pattern didnt look bad though, pretty even throughout the ways. Movement was smooth in all axis's, if a little stiff do to inaction and old oil. Spindle spun smooth, no grittiness or anything that i could feel. All in all ive got a good feeling about this one, may be close to the end of its lifespan but should be more than enough tool for me. Plus, a 6x18 is 6 more inches than i was looking for, so that should come in handy.

    Picking it up tomorrow, going to take a few days after that to find a spot for it, get everything cleaned up and so on and so forth. Going to get pretty much everything stripped down and cleaned first thing, try to get it looking a little better, have to replace the y axis way covers, might do something with the paint, dunno. More to come!





    Youll have to excuse the crappy pictures, the camera on my phone is a little... lacking. Enough to see by though, ill have some better pictures once its in the shop.

    Only downside so far is the 1hp 3-phase motor. No 3-phase in my shop, so a VFD is in my future. I was planning on grabbing one of these:
    https://www.automationdirect.com/adc..._VAC)/GS1-21P0

    Single phase 220 in, 3 phase out to match the motor, seems to me like itd work, though im certainly open to options if anybody has a recommendation

  • #2
    Looks like a great place to start, nice score. I have one of those Automation Direct GS1 drives on my old SB milling machine. I use it just as you do, 1 phase in to 3 phase out for a 1HP motor. Not the most sophistocated VFD out there, but inexpensive, works great, and mine has been trouble free for 15 or so years.Worth every penny. AD has great support as well.

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    • #3
      Nice it will be very handy...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by alanganes View Post
        Looks like a great place to start, nice score. I have one of those Automation Direct GS1 drives on my old SB milling machine. I use it just as you do, 1 phase in to 3 phase out for a 1HP motor. Not the most sophistocated VFD out there, but inexpensive, works great, and mine has been trouble free for 15 or so years.Worth every penny. AD has great support as well.
        That makes me feel a lot better about pulling the trigger on it then, i was kinda on the fence until someone chimed in. Much appreciated! Be able to get that order put in tonight now, free 2 day shipping too

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        • #5
          As the owner of 15 Automation Direct VFDs and having installed several more, I like the GS2 series. A very few more dollars, but nicer features. The GS2-11P0 is 120V in and 220V 3 phase out. That allows you to plug it into a regular outlet. I have remote controls on all of mine. You can build one for under $20. I can send you the detailed instructions if you want. The programming is easy and adds to the way they work.
          Peter

          One of my drill presses with a GS2 11P0 VFD and remote right up front. The readout on the VFD shows actual spindle RPMs
          Grantham, New Hampshire

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          • #6
            No magnetic chuck or already removed?

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            • #7
              does the table ride on rollers....or a plain bearing surface? Just a reminder that if rollers, and many grinders are, SOP is the table and rollers should be removed for transportation....bouncing along down the road can damage and rollers....and probably will if on a stiff suspension truck
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                does the table ride on rollers....or a plain bearing surface? Just a reminder that if rollers, and many grinders are, SOP is the table and rollers should be removed for transportation....bouncing along down the road can damage and rollers....and probably will if on a stiff suspension truck
                Even if it's not a roller bearing table it should either be removed or strapped separately to the bearing surface beneath it. Tables are sometimes held on by nothing more than their own weight.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                  Even if it's not a roller bearing table it should either be removed or strapped separately to the bearing surface beneath it. Tables are sometimes held on by nothing more than their own weight.
                  good point
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                  • #10
                    Old gift cards make good anti denting shims for under rollers (spectrometers use then when you lock the optics for transport too!)
                    Just slip in under the wheel
                    Mark

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                      No magnetic chuck or already removed?
                      Magnetic chuck on there, just hard to see in the photos. Again, sorry about those, a better camera is on my list at some point...

                      Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                      does the table ride on rollers....or a plain bearing surface? Just a reminder that if rollers, and many grinders are, SOP is the table and rollers should be removed for transportation....bouncing along down the road can damage and rollers....and probably will if on a stiff suspension truck
                      Plain bearing surface, but the table is already going to be riding in the cab of the truck or strapped down separately in the bed. Ive heard one too many horror stories about something going wrong with the table during transport

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                      • #12
                        sounds like you are all set. Its great having a grinder at hand.....I look forward to some 'camera' photos ( ) when you get it home
                        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                        • #13
                          Whelp, its in the bed of my truck and sitting in my driveway! I say in the bed because while i was watching in joy at the sight of them forklifting it into the bed, i forgot to consider how the **** i was going to get it out...

                          Finally dug up a spec sheet and turns out the dealer lowballed the weight. He had guessed 5-600lbs, turns out its got a listed shipping weight of 1000lbs, a good 70% of which im guessing is in the stand. All solid cast-iron, that... Im honestly considering welding up a new, somewhat lighter stand for the grinder itself to sit on and sending the base to a farm upstate. I know more weight and mass is better for a machine like this, but at the same time im a little worried for my floors

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                          • #14
                            If its a concrete floor, keep the base. As you state masses of cast iron do a lot to damp vibrations and might even be precision made (some bases are scraped into the machine so as to give an extra layer against inducing any twist). No one trying to get a great finish with a grinder ever complained it weight too much, and steel can literally ring compared to cast iron's damping properties.

                            Have you get any lifting equipment? maybe a tow truck wrecker?
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                              If its a concrete floor, keep the base. As you state masses of cast iron do a lot to damp vibrations and might even be precision made (some bases are scraped into the machine so as to give an extra layer against inducing any twist). No one trying to get a great finish with a grinder ever complained it weight too much, and steel can literally ring compared to cast iron's damping properties.

                              Have you get any lifting equipment? maybe a tow truck wrecker?
                              Theres the problem, its a wood floor and up a flight of stairs. The planned spot is directly on top of a floor joist and a support beam, but still, a thousand pounds is a lot of weight to have sitting there. Plus, getting it up the stairs and through the door is looking more and more impossible the more i look at it. After dealing with my mini mill and lathe, im NEVER going to even think about complaining about more rigidity and weight dampening, but at the same time i have to be realistic with what i can do.

                              My tentative plan right now is to scrap the base and weld up a solid base in its place. My justification for that is A) the base isnt in the best shape anyway, paints chipping, a few rust spots, found a crack in the casting, B) a steel base would better fit my current shop situation, at the expense of some dampening from the lower weight, and C) in the future if my shop situation changes the grinder would be easier to move to its new home, and if the new home allows it the base could be filled with concrete or something to gain that weight back.

                              Ill sit on the decision for a bit though, theres a lot of work to be done on the machine itself after all. Ill get it cleaned up, working, up and running on the bench first, then work on figuring out a stand. All said though, welding up a steel stand does look to my eyes like it would be the best option, and it seems to work for other people. Stefan Gotteswinter, for example, did something similar with his smaller grinder, and it seemed to work alright:
                              http://gtwr.de/shop/pro_lip515/newmachine.html

                              Forgot to mention, the base of the tool is held to the stand with 4 bolts. If it were lapped to the base i probably wouldnt even be considering making a new one. Then again, if it were lapped to the base i probably couldntve afforded it...
                              Last edited by epicfail48; 09-18-2018, 06:31 PM. Reason: Forgot something

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