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  • Help with motor

    Ok I picked up a #2 LeBlond Tool Grinder.

    I would like to find a 110/220 v motor that I can swap for it but I need a hand identifying a replacement.
    Tag on motor:


    The over all size:


    This has two screw holes to mount it:

    More photos next frame.

  • #2
    The shaft:






    The roller (This runs on the inside of a step pulley to change speeds):



    One thought is to buy a motor, pull the shaft and cut the tapper and drill the motor to match the spacing.

    Thought two drill the pully to match the new motor.

    Comment


    • #3
      The shaft is tappered:






      The roller (This runs on the inside of a step pulley to change speeds):



      I would like to find a motor that would just replace this one.

      One thought is to buy a motor, pull the shaft and cut the tapper and drill the motor to match the spacing.

      Thought two drill the pully to match the new motor.

      Comment


      • #4
        Probably cheaper, easier and better to get a VFD, unless the motor you have is junk.

        Comment


        • #5
          Motor is junk. I thought about rebuild.

          Comment


          • #6
            You really should use a TP or whatever grinder to cut that taper accurately (put the rotor between centers) I'm setting up to do just that on some Baldor motors. Or... change the pulley system to keyed.

            Comment


            • #7
              "junk" has many meanings. What is the reason you believe the motor is "junk"?

              Problem is you have a motor that is a "special". You will. not. find another one unless it is on another grinder. You would have to modify any other motor to have the tapered shaft, if nothing else. The picture of the dataplate is small, and when I copied it elsewhere and expanded it, it was nearly unreadable, so some of the data is unknown.

              Maybe you can rig up a different motor and not need the taper mount shaft.

              But, most grinders, if belt drive (as you seem to say), have specially balanced motors, so you may need to balance the rotor on any replacement.

              If it is a direct drive, the motor may have both special balancing and high grade bearings. Common sloppy C3 bearings will not be what is wanted in that case. This accounts for the questions about why you cannot use the existing "junk" motor.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                "junk" has many meanings. What is the reason you believe the motor is "junk"?
                Has a motor shop declared it junk? Might be worth the small investment to have a pro look at it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The motor has a rubber wheel mounted to it. The rubber wheel rides on the inside of what can be best described as a step pulley. The weight of the motor to the rubber wheel drives the step pulley. The other end of the step pulley passes thought a bearing mounted cast iron. The other side is a strap the drives the upper spindle.

                  This motor is a 3 phase and I would like to get away from that.

                  The plate:

                  MOD 5K49BC636A
                  HP 3/4
                  PH 3
                  TYPE K
                  RPM 3450
                  Volts 220/440
                  AMP 1.3 / .9
                  CY 60
                  GEJ 903
                  Locked KVA PER HP [Blank]
                  TEMP *** 50deg C
                  Time Rating Cont DY

                  US Pat 1812748,2085995, 2180983
                  Made in the USA

                  N.P. 76510

                  The other tag [paper] tells me it is a Wye.

                  Trying to get the manual uploaded to VintageMachinery.org but will have to reduce the size some how. It has nothing as much as to working on the grinder only how to run it and a IPB.


                  The previous owner had it wired for 440 and ran it with a 220 rotary phase. Not sure if that is the problem with this motor. I rewired to 220 3 phase.

                  When I start the motor is runs up to about 75% speed and stalls. Then it pops the breaker. Motor spins free, the spindle upper and lower spin free. Upper is new bearings.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Having the old motor re-wound and adding a VFD would be my easy way out. How much room do you have in the cabinet base for a single phase motor of the same power output? If you go with a replacement motor, what about making a new pulley and adding a square cross section O-ring to it as a drive tire? Grinding a taper on a replacement motor seems a bit of a chore for what the motor does.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For a surface grinder, a three phase motor will probably run a lot smoother than a single phase, with much less torque ripple, which can affect surface finish. It seems unusual for a motor to start up OK but stall and draw overcurrent when it approaches full speed. I would suspect possibly bad or dry bearings, or imbalanced rotor or corrosion or debris which may cause the rotor to impact the stator laminations. But that should be evidenced by significant noise. It would be worthwhile to take it apart to inspect and clean it. A VFD would be only $100 or so for 1 HP.
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Interesting way to drive, probably done partly to cut vibration.

                        Originally posted by outlawspeeder View Post
                        ....

                        When I start the motor is runs up to about 75% speed and stalls. Then it pops the breaker. Motor spins free, the spindle upper and lower spin free. Upper is new bearings.
                        This is puzzling.... When you says "and stalls". do you mean it will not go faster, it "stalls " at that speed? yes, that would draw excess current. OR.... do you mean it goes up to that speed and then "stops", (slows down to a stop)?

                        Does it do the same when the rubber wheel is NOT driving the "pulley"?

                        Failing to drive full speed actually sounds correct for a motor wired for "440" and run on "220". How sure are you that it WAS 440 and NOW IS 220?
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Something very similar happened to me with a Kearney & Trecker 2H milling machine. Granted, they are vastly different machines and I'm not sure how yours is built or if what I have to say is relevant. But.

                          When I got my K&T 2H 5hp 3 phase it would trip the overloads at 1400 RPM (top speed). The motor seemed to run smooth and quiet, The spindle turned free and everything operated very nice until 1400 rpm. Turns out that someone put the wrong oil in it at some point. The oil appeared to be heavy black engine oil. I did 2 flushes and filled it with the proper oil which solved the problem.

                          Could yours have the wrong grease, oil or tight bearings?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Update (for those that care)

                            I pulled the motor apart. The bearings were caked with bad stuff. I cleaned them put it back together and took it to be tested. The testing was free . It did get a clean bill of health.

                            I pulled apart the switch... so I changed this up to a new relay. Now it is running as it should.

                            So here are the photos:

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                            • #15

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