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Worlds most powerful shop vacuum only $78

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  • Worlds most powerful shop vacuum only $78

    My excellent 20 year old shop vac burned up. I went out and started looking for a replacement. a complete nightmare nothing but lies and misinformation such things as 7 1/2 hp 110 V vacuum. 450 air watts, does anyone have an air what meter? Grainger doesn’t quote “water suction it quotes water pressure on the outlet side.The only place you can find accurate information is from the people that actually make vacuum motors.There are hundreds of companies that make shop vac‘s but only a few actual internal vacuum motor assembly BuildersThe most powerful one that I could find was 116765–13 Amtech lamb motor.It was also one of the cheapest because this is a high-volume motor that is used in central vacuums for houses.It is a three stage unit 110 V and sucks 136 inches of water I had to carve up my old vacuum to fit it in and when it was all said and done I ended up with 118 inches of sealed water suction this is STILL much better than some of the thousand dollar shop vac‘s that were tested on YouTube.Edwin Dirnbeck


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 09-28-2018, 12:23 PM.

  • #2
    Nice retrofit. I have one of those central vac blower motors around here someplace. They move an amazing amount of air. I'm planning to make it part of a dust collector system for my grinders. Thanks for posting, I really enjoy seeing these sorts of projects.
    Thanks for posting.

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    • #3
      That's pretty neat... But DAMN that sounds like a lot of work and time for a vacuum cleaner!

      I found that with my own recent new vacuums for the wood and metal shop that they pulled a LOT of volume. So much that they were choking with smaller hose. I went with 2 1/2" hose and it's amazing what the suction is like at the end of the hose now. I suspect that you're MegaVac will be in the same situation and will work best with 2 1/2" hose now. It's not just suction after all. It's the volume AND speed of the air flow that lifts the stuff and pulls it down the tube.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        Ed, pretty neat that you looked at water pressure on the suction side and you're dead on with using it.
        Having worked on vacuum system designs to evacuate punch press scrap , it is the true method for evaluation whether a closed system or during "open hose" functions.
        Many consider vacuum piping systems as they would a compressed air system ......and they are indeed different !
        Rich

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        • #5
          Thanks for the reply .I have very limited space and it was important for my vacuum to fit in the space.That was another reason that I retrofitted the vacuum also most of my vacuuming is done on steel and aluminum chips.They require a very strong vacuum to avoid clogging also notice that I am using a smooth bore swimming pool hose for the vacuum. I actually purchased a 6 hp shop vac that fit in the space it cost $95. it only had, believe it or not 32 inches of sealed water vacuum.This would never work on the chips that I need to vacuum


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 09-28-2018, 02:20 PM.

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          • #6
            Centrifugal fans such as vacuum motors have two KEY specifications.

            Lift, Which is the water column they will pull, and the aspect that is presented by Edwin. Lift is representative of construction quality and design of impellers and housing etc.

            Then there is CFM. CFM is moving mass, and that takes horse power. Bottom line is Amps or Watts.

            I have no idea what an "Air Watt" is? It must be right there with air compressor "developed horse power". ;-)

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            • #7
              Great idea.

              I wonder what that 3 stage blower looks like internally? Would you please take it apart and take some photos for us?

              I wonder how much pressure it can make? Since you're into measurement, maybe you could check that. I wonder what kind of front end compressor it would make for a jet engine bench project..

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Glug View Post
                Great idea.

                I wonder what that 3 stage blower looks like internally? Would you please take it apart and take some photos for us?

                I wonder how much pressure it can make? Since you're into measurement, maybe you could check that. I wonder what kind of front end compressor it would make for a jet engine bench project..
                The blower SHOULD develop about the same water PRESSURE as the vacuum LIFT,but you wont know until you or I try.Grainger USE to specify vacuum LIFT.NOW they specify blower PRESURE.The reason is because they want the canister to snap on and off easily for emtying ,therefore the sealing lip doesn't clamp very well and the device looses a great deal of sealed water vacuum.HOWEVER,the pressure side is glued together permanently and maintains full pressure. The motor and vacuum fan are a crimped together unit.My original was a 2 stage ,the new one is a three stage.You can see pictures and specs on the amtec- lamb pdf.You can lookat the grainger book and see blower pressure specs for their shop vacs.This was an interesting project and only took me 13 days state to finish. Edwin Dirnbeck

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                • #9
                  Now that is timing!

                  I replace my shop vac a few weeks back after the one I had for years burnt up. No flames, but a lot of smoke. Using it last night I kept thinking of how much this didn't suck. I kept cleaning the filter but it wasn't cutting it. It can't even pick up a small metal chip off the floor.

                  I might have to put one of these together with a 55 gal drum.

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                  • #10
                    Hey, if it sucks, it sucks. That's all you really want from a shop vac.

                    Good job.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    Make it fit.
                    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                    • #11
                      Was expecting a Dyson ad!

                      Very nice.. can double as a robot Halloween decoration.

                      Fwiw I have a Craftsman vac.. red plastic lower, black top that I am astounded by as far as how much I have abused it, and how it keeps going. When my dad passed I got his Fein vac, and it was a total pos compared to my old Craftsman.

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                      • #12
                        Find a pro cellulose insulation blower & you'll have the best. Looks like a turbocharger.
                        "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                        world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                        country, in easy stages."
                        ~ James Madison

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                        • #13
                          How is this working for you?

                          I'm thinking of DIY'ing one for my shop, 10x24. I'll use a 20 gallon metal barrel in the corner and have 2 or 3 strategically placed outlets. Any tips or suggestions?

                          Thanks!!

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                          • #14
                            I’ve purchased 2 of the older Greenlee Shop vacs, they are very powerful as they are used pull lines in electrical conduit. Very expensive new. We have it installed on a 55 gal drum with a plastic bag in it. Use stacked filters with the deep tank. Cleanout is just pull the bag and toss it.

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