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No markings on tail stock quill

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  • #16
    Backing out does not count.. if you backed out at 5 1/2 and resume drilling, next time crank comes to start point it's a 6.. easy....

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    • #17
      Bolt a set of cheap digital calipers to it, can be zeroed out at any point mmaking it very easy to achieve precise depth and very easy to read, cheap fiber reinforced plastic ones are easy to cut and drill, cost less than 10$ and are accurate to 0.1 mm and for a tail-stock that is all the precision you need.

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      • #18
        I thought all lathes had a scale wheel on the handwheel of the tailstock. My two lathes do and they can be set just like the X and Y.
        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
          I thought all lathes had a scale wheel on the handwheel of the tailstock. My two lathes do and they can be set just like the X and Y.
          Far from it. My old Myford ML7 did not. The three or four 9" South Bend lathes I've seen over the years starting in high school ship didn't and neither did my Father's big 12 or 13" South Bend. Nor did an old Logan that I used now and then at work.

          My Asian 12x36 has the scale wheel and it's settable too. And in fact I think it's the first lathe I've ever worked on that has a tailstock thread number that makes any sense. I could use the marks on the ram in conjunction with the handwheel scale. But that would mean I'd have to set the tailstock's ram on a specific line before sliding into position. It's just easier to use the ruler and the positionable index marker. And as mentioned I've never needed the accuracy while drilling where I needed to be that specific that the handwheel's scale in connection with the ruler would have been needed.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #20
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            Far from it. My old Myford ML7 did not. The three or four 9" South Bend lathes I've seen over the years starting in high school ship didn't and neither did my Father's big 12 or 13" South Bend. Nor did an old Logan that I used now and then at work.

            My Asian 12x36 has the scale wheel and it's settable too. And in fact I think it's the first lathe I've ever worked on that has a tailstock thread number that makes any sense. I could use the marks on the ram in conjunction with the handwheel scale. But that would mean I'd have to set the tailstock's ram on a specific line before sliding into position. It's just easier to use the ruler and the positionable index marker. And as mentioned I've never needed the accuracy while drilling where I needed to be that specific that the handwheel's scale in connection with the ruler would have been needed.
            OK, thanks for the info. There are so many things I take for granted living in the civilized world.
            Location: The Black Forest in Germany

            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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            • #21
              ....There are so many things I take for granted living in the civilized world.
              Oooooo... SNAP GURL! ! !
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #22
                Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                I'd have to say that we need to take into account the CRAFT quotient. CRAFT being "Can't Remember a *$)@*! Thing".
                Machines are going to solve all this for us:

                "Alexa, how do I drill a hole on my *$)@* lathe?"

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Glug View Post
                  Machines are going to solve all this for us:

                  "Alexa, how do I drill a hole on my *$)@* lathe?"
                  That would be hilarious.... especially when "they" come out with an adaptive learning Alexa that picks up on the household's language practices and like a bad parrot learns to cuss as much as the masters....
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #24
                    I'll be happy when Amazon fixes the Alexa parser. For instance, I have a group of lamps named headboard placed, conveniently on each end of the bed's headboard.

                    This works: Alexa, turn the headboard off.

                    This does not: Alexa, turn headboard off.

                    Sigh.

                    Back on topic..

                    There are ways to etch markings onto a tailstock using a battery and acid. My tailstocks have very coarse markings on them. One has 1/8 inch and 1mm markings as well as a .001 divisions on the handwheel (.050 per revolution).

                    The other has 1/16 inch markings on the quill and no markings on the handwheel, but I marked the collar and measured the movement as .059 per rev. Yep, 1.5mm pitch I have used magnets and a caliper to measure to the back of the drill chuck. When I just need a ballpark I have been known to count full or partial revs.

                    Dan
                    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                    Location: SF East Bay.

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                    • #25
                      Gosh, sounds like there are some spoiled brats on here. Many lathes before the 'fifties didn't even have cross slide handwheel markings, had 16tpi threads and the old guys working them had to borrow the only rule in the shop off the foreman to set their callipers.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                        I did something similar to what mars-red is suggesting. It pretty much needs a flat top side with this simpler style. Small rare earth magnets hold the ruler to the nose plate and the small piece of aluminium angle as the movable index marker to the corner of the main body.

                        ............

                        The neat thing with this method is that I always have a 6" scale ready at hand for a quick measurement.

                        I've never needed to measure anything I've done with the tail stock to anything finer than I can do with the ruler. But I can see where some operations would be better done with a dial gauge or with a converted caliper. It would not take a whole lot of work for me to make a magnetic holder for a dial gauge to read off the upper ear if I were doing something that required that sort of accuracy. But for the lion's share of my work the ruler has proven to be more than close enough for depth of drilled holes and the like.
                        Lathes that can have the ram pretty much flush with the T/S lose that much travel from the clamp. If you only have 2 3/8" total, losing a half inch to some bogus clamp is undesirable.

                        Just scribe marks on the top of the ram. It works, and requires no reduction of the travel. The Logan is graduated in 1/8" increnpments, but the screw is probably 1/10", I never worry closer than that..... I use a micrometer stop if I need more precision.


                        As for the spoiled brats.... those shops like you describe went broke in the 1930s if not before... unless they were really out in the boonies. Probably by 1910 anywhere "real".
                        Last edited by J Tiers; 10-05-2018, 12:16 AM.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #27
                          The clamp on bracket is only 1/4" thick. And it's the 1/4" that I can't use because even with the bracket in position the tapers I've got all hit the ejector before the bracket contacts the body of the tailstock.

                          I also think that most lathes I've used tended to eject the tapers before the rams fully went away. Oh sure, the rams will retract fully. But if they can't hold an arbor with the ram that far in then it's not really usable travel anyway.

                          At any rate the bracket, ruler and sliding index work for me and I find it extremely handy. And I find the ruler and slider far more friendly to use than the marks on the ram. But to each their own.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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