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Rosie the rivlter mystery machine tool

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  • Rosie the rivlter mystery machine tool

    These pictures are from an article in the June 2018 issue of world war two magazine.The lady in the picture is operating a mystery machine.It is identified as a Lathe and a turret lathe on a separate page. I think that it is a special machine used in the gear making industry maybe for putting in keyways.Does any one know for sure? Notice the long sleeves and no safety glasses Edwin Dirnbeck s


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    Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 10-07-2018, 05:32 PM.

  • #2
    I found a better picture at https://cdn-blog.adafruit.com/upload...-blog427-1.jpg

    It appears to be either a mill, a jig borer or a measuring device. There is a huge rotab on the table, and a chuck mounted on that. The chuck is holding what appears to be a gear. She's peering at what looks like some sort of measuring device.
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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    • #3
      I can't answer you question & the picture is too small on my chrome book but they do make verical lathes.
      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
      country, in easy stages."
      ~ James Madison

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      • #4
        My guess would be vertical shaper

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        • #5
          Slotter

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          • #6

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            • #7
              Its obvious its a slotter, just look at the tool..

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 754 View Post
                Its obvious its a slotter, just look at the tool..
                Whats the difference between slotter and vertical shaper?

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                • #9
                  Now there are some baggy clothes to get caught in a spindle.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                    Whats the difference between slotter and vertical shaper?
                    AFAIK, they are the same thing - a "slotter" is also known as a "vertical shaper". I think 754's response was to the original post, not to your answer.

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                    • #11
                      Yes I viewed the pic and made my guess before I read the answers.
                      Maybe they make vertical shapers, if it does not have a built in index mechanism I would not call it a slotter.

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                      • #12
                        Yep' "slotter" … but I'm sure that this is just a staged photo. Look close, the gear is not clamped in the three jaw chuck, looks to be just sitting on the top of the jaws. The machine is just too clean to have been in production and finally the gal sure isn't wearing shoes suitable for a machine shop, mighty clean outfit she is wearing as well.


                        Joe B
                        Last edited by JoeCB; 10-07-2018, 08:45 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Specifically its a Pratt & Whitney 12 inch Vertical Shaper. Why is it a shaper and not a slotter? Because P&W called it a shaper But seriously P&W marketed the machine as a tool room piece. It featured longitudinal, traverse and rotary power feeds (or any combination of). The rotary table could be optioned with a indexing attachment.

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                          • #14
                            Probably a "posed" picture unless it was normal for work boots to have high heels in those days.
                            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                            • #15
                              I doubt any woman machinist would wear an outfit with an open bodice. Too much chance of hot chips getting in there...

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